Andres Segovia & John Williams | Guitar Virtuosity

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Guitar Virtuosity

by Andres Segovia & John Williams

Classical Guitar performed by world famous icons ... the best of the best.
Genre: Classical: Concerto
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Violin Partita No. 3 in E Major, BWV 1006: III. Gavotte en Rondeau (Arr. for Guitar)
Andres Segovia
2:52 $0.99
clip
2. Violin Partita No. 2 in D Minor, BWV 1004: V. Chaconne (Arr. for Guitar)
Andres Segovia
12:06 $0.99
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3. Cello Suite No. 6 in D Major, BWV 1012: V. Gavotte I - VI. Gavotte II (Arr. for Guitar)
Andres Segovia
3:45 $0.99
clip
4. Lute Suite in E Minor, BWV 996: IV. Sarabande (Arr. for Guitar)
Andres Segovia
3:20 $0.99
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5. Lute Suite in E Minor, BWV 996: V. Bourrée (Arr. for Guitar)
Andres Segovia
1:25 $0.99
clip
6. Prelude in C Minor, BWV 999
Andres Segovia
1:11 $0.99
clip
7. Cello Suite No. 6 in C Major, BWV 1012: III. Courante (Arr. for Guitar)
Andres Segovia
2:42 $0.99
clip
8. Introduction and Variations on a Theme by Mozart, Op. 9
John Williams
6:55 $0.99
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9. Oracion
John Williams
3:18 $0.99
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10. Estudio
John Williams
2:13 $0.99
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11. Madriguera Humoroda
John Williams
1:53 $0.99
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12. Barcarolle
John Williams
3:22 $0.99
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13. La Maja Ge Goya
John Williams
4:53 $0.99
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14. Vals Criollo
John Williams
2:44 $0.99
clip
15. Keyboard Sonata in E Minor, K. 198 (Arr. for Guitar)
John Williams
3:04 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Andrés Segovia (1893-1987) is considered to be the father of the modern classical guitar movement by most modern scholars. Many feel that without his efforts the classical guitar would still be considered a lowly bar instrument, played only by peasants.

Segovia's quest to elevate the guitar to a prominent position in the music world began at the early age of four. His uncle used to sing songs to him and pretend to strum an imaginary guitar in his lap. Luckily for us there was a luthier nearby and Segovia took an instant liking to the guitar. Although discouraged by his family (according to them he should play a "real" instrument), he continued to pursue his studies of the guitar. He set a goal for the guitar and himself early in life. The goal was to bring Guitar studies to every university in the world, have the guitar played throughout the world, on every major stage, just as the piano and violin were, and lastly, to pass on his love of the guitar to generations to follow. He considered himself to be the messenger that would complete this impossible quest.

He succeeded in all respects.

Segovia gave his first concert in Spain at the age of sixteen. His professional debut was at the age of twenty in Madrid. His original program included transcriptions from Tárrega, as well as his own transcriptions of Bach and others. Many so called "serious" musicians believed that Segovia would be laughed off of the stage because the guitar could not play classical music. But Segovia astounded the audience. The only problem he had was that the guitar could not produce enough sound to fill the hall. Over the coming years, Segovia would perfect his technique and push luthiers to experiment with new woods and designs that could increase the natural amplification of the guitar. With the advent of Nylon strings, the guitar could produce more consistent tones, while also being able to project the sound much farther.

Segovia's quest lead him to America in 1928 for his first concert in New York. Again he overwhelmed the audience with his technique and musicianship, and converted more dissenters to the classical guitar. His rousing success in New York led to offers for more appearances in America and Europe, and a trip to the Orient in 1929. Segovia, and the classical guitar had arrived.

Segovia is credited as the father of the classical guitar, having widened the repertoire, transcribing works originally for lute and harpsichord and breathing new life into the instrument. John Williams studied under him at the Accademia Musicale Chigiana in Siena, and is regarded as one of the foremost musicians of his generation, a master of the classical repertoire who brought the guitar to a wider audience with the group Sky and through collaborations involving the music of South America, Africa and jazz.

Williams, whose recordings include Cavatina, a worldwide hit after it became the theme tune to the Oscar-winning film The Deer Hunter, reveals through his biography that on a visit to London in 1977, Segovia heard him play Cavatina. The Spaniard commented that it was "a very pretty tune".

Graham Wade, classical guitarist and author of books on Segovia, said "Segovia's pupils all played very differently. Segovia's guitar was always absolutely lyrical. He saw the guitar as a melodic instrument … John is perhaps the most technically accomplished guitarist the world has seen … and a worthy successor to Segovia."

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Executive Producer: Felix Girard


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