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Anne La Berge & Joe Williamson | The Hum

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Avant Garde: Sound Art Spoken Word: Radio Drama Moods: Instrumental
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The Hum

by Anne La Berge & Joe Williamson

Improvised sonic radio plays for voices, flute and double bass
Genre: Avant Garde: Sound Art
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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. The Hum
Anne La Berge & Joe Williamson
19:21 album only
clip
2. 4 Degrees
Anne La Berge & Joe Williamson
19:27 album only
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
THE HUM


LA BERGE & WILLIAMSON

Anne La Berge - flutes
Joe Williamson - double bass

Anne La Berge grew up in Stillwater, Minnesota. She moved to The Netherlands in 1989 where she has lived ever since. She has lived in California, Indiana, Minnesota, New Mexico, Illinois and Amsterdam.
Joe Williamson was born in British Columbia. He moved to Europe in 1992. He has lived in Vancouver, Melbourne, Montreal, Amsterdam, Berlin and London. He currently lives in Stockholm with his family.
Recorded and edited by Anne La Berge and Joe Williamson
at Elektronmusikstudion EMS Stockholm.
Mixed by Joeri Saal at Studio150 Amsterdam.
Design Isabelle Vigier. ©2014 the artists / unsounds



Anne La Berge and Joe Williamson have migrated from the northern territories in North America to lands further north and east to fufil their artistic dreams. When they met in Stockholm in June 2013, it had been a long time since
they had last played together. Catching
up on life and music, they traced the places where they had and had not lived together, the routes they had taken separately and where paths had crossed; in 40, monologues found a way to a mutually formed music.
Then they slipped in an area where facts real and unreal grow contagiously, and that’s how they made the Hum.

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