Ann Magnuson | Dream Girl

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Avant Garde: Psychedelia Spoken Word: Storytelling Moods: Mood: Weird
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Dream Girl

by Ann Magnuson

Weird, wild and whimsical psychedelic folk-pop-surreal-spoken-word dreamscape storytelling with songs!
Genre: Avant Garde: Psychedelia
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. We're All Mad
4:25 $0.99
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2. Be a Satyr
10:17 $1.44
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3. Bromance Nightmare
4:52 $0.99
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4. Cat in the Sun
4:44 $0.99
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5. The Enchanted Forest
2:55 $0.99
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6. Dreams of the Everyday Housewife
4:23 $0.99
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7. Cobras in Love
2:31 $0.99
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8. Dreamboat Annie
3:07 $0.99
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9. Ayahuasca the Movie
13:54 $1.99
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10. Relieved to Be Irrelevant
6:02 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes

Ann Magnuson (www.annmagnuson.com) is a writer/actress/singer/musician/performer whose eclectic resume traverses the entertainment landscape like few others. She has acted in Hollywood blockbusters, Off-Broadway plays, TV sitcoms and indie films, fronted various bands, written for numerous publications and has presented her original performance art pieces at several major museums.

She has also released two solo albums. Her latest and third solo album, Dream Girl is a surreal dreamscape of spoken word and song. Spoken word has its roots in poetry and theater as well as the talking blues and rock music. Magnuson turned the genre truly psychedelic with brilliant and subversive dream-based lyrics in her band, Bongwater in the 1990s.

With Dream Girl, Magnuson returns to her inimitable-style of surreal storytelling and whimsical songwriting. With the exception of two cover songs (a moving rendition of the 1968 Glen Campbell hit, “Dreams of the Everyday Housewife” and a wistful take on HEART’S “Dreamboat Annie”), the 50-minute album features brand new original material that plumbs the depths of Magnuson’s fertile imagination. Musical support comes from film composer and guitarist, The Millionaire (who was behind '90s cocktail-music revolutionaries Combustible Edison) and drummer, Joe Berardi (Rufus Wainwright, Donovan, Lydia Lunch). Mark Wheaton (Dave Davies, Nels Cline) engineered the album.

From dreamy psychedelic-folk in “We’re All Mad”, seductive beat-girl trance in “Be a Satyr,” to a Morrison-esque shamanic epic in “Ayahausca: The Movie,” the scenes shift rapidly. So do the dramatis personæ. Kate Pierson of the B-52s provides guest vocals on the trippy sunshine-pop tune, “Cat in the Sun”; the dream-specter of David Bowie makes an appearance (in “The Enchanted Forest”) and contemporary Hollywood culture is mercilessly skewered in “Bromance Nightmare.” As to be expected, her characters are many and vivid but at heart Magnuson is a suburban Appalachian Dorothy wandering through a strange new world, marveling at the Technicolor beauty and rank absurdity of it all.

Born and raised in Charleston, West Virginia Ann went to New York City in 1978 (after a junior year abroad in London during the punk heyday of ’76-‘77) and soon became part of the seminal art, music and performance scene that exploded in downtown New York City in the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s. There she managed the now-infamous neo-Dada cabaret and art space, Club 57; was president of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Lower East Side and started the all-girl percussive ‘orchestra’ Pulsallama. She performed regularly in downtown theaters, galleries and clubs including The Kitchen, The Mudd Club, Danceteria, The Pyramid Club and CBGB. In addition to her many bands and solo work, Ann collaborated with performers Eric Bogosian, Kestutis Nakas, John Sex and Joey Arias in numerous shows including performing and writing songs with the legendary John Cale for his performance piece “Life Underwater.” She also directed The New Wave Vaudeville show that launched the career of New Wave operatic icon Klaus Nomi.

As a singer and songwriter, she has been in several bands including the sardonic folk trio Bleaker Street Incident, her heavy metal band, Vulcan Death Grip and the psycho-psychedelic band, Bongwater with whom she released five albums and gained an international cult following that remains rabid today. Magnuson has also released two solo albums, The Luv Show released (Geffen 1995) and Pretty Songs & Ugly Stories (Asphodel 2007). Her EP, The Jobriath Medley, was released in 2012.
Ann has appeared as a guest vocalist on The Tindersticks album Curtains (singing with Stuart Staples in the duet “Buried Bones"). She has also appeared as an actress in music videos, most notably as the crazed Annie in the Redd Kross video “Annie’s Gone” and as the mysterious Goth chick tormenting Alice in Chain’s Jerry Cantrell in his video for “My Song”.

She deconstructed the concepts of success and failure through the stories and songs of glam rockers Jobriath and David Bowie at SFMOMA in 2011 in a musical theater piece titled, “The Rock Star as Witch Doctor, Myth-Maker and Ritual Sacrifice.” In 2012, she performed portions of that show as well as all of The Jobriath Medley at REDCAT as part of the OUTFEST Platinum series and was asked to create a special "Mudd Club Cabaret" for the Cindy Sherman opening in July 2012 at SFMOMA. Ann curated and performer her “One Hour Bacchanal” as part of the Mike Kelly retrospective at MOCA in 2014 and is co-curator of a gallery show about Club 57 (in conjunction with a film series) at the Museum of Modern Art in 2017.

As a film actress, Magnuson has appeared in a wild variety of roles in major Hollywood films such as The Hunger (with David Bowie), Clear and Present Danger, Making Mr. Right, Panic Room, Desperately Seeking Susan and the cult classic Cabin Boy. She has acted in many independent films, recently co-starring opposite Christopher Walken and Amber Heard in One More Time (which premiered at the 2015 Tribeca Film Festival under the original title When I Live My Life Over Again.)
Magnuson also a regular cast member of the early 1990s ABC-TV sitcom Anything But Love (opposite Jaimie Lee Curtis and Richard Lewis) and has appeared in numerous TV shows including Modern Family, Frasier, CSI:Miami, The Drew Carey Show, the HBO series’ From the Earth to the Moon and Looking among others. Off Broadway credits include The Vagina Monologues, John Patrick Shanley’s Four Dogs and a Bone as well as her own one-woman show You Could Be Home Now.

Magnuson also starred in the LA premiere of Amy and David Sedaris' play The Book of Liz and her show Rave Mom played P.S.122 in 2001. Magnuson also co-wrote and starred in Vandemonium (1987), a surreally comic special for Cinemax.
Her new web series, “Ann Magnuson’s Dream Puppet Theater” (which features the first track on Dream Girl, “We’re All Mad”) premieres online in September. Watch the trailer here: www.annmagnuson.com

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Reviews


to write a review

michael holman

genius!
Listening to Dream Girl, fabulous! A sexy Marlene Dietrich, on acid, from outer space, by way of West Virginia, with a stop over in Joshua's Tree!
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David Epstein

Pretty songs and bubbling cobras
If you liked the lush melodicism of _Pretty Songs and Ugly Stories_, and if you liked the puckish dream narratives of any given Bongwater album, I think you're gonna love this hybrid of those. It's an Ambien stagger through the densest morsels of Ms. Magnuson's skull. Funny, eerie, trenchant, and catchy, by turns and simultaneously.
Read more...

NORN CUTSON

WOW, WHAT A TRIP!!!! SO FANTASTIC!!!!! It's a TOTAL RIDE!!!
I turned everything off, lay down in the dark and listened on headphones (as prescribed).
WOW, WHAT A TRIP!!!! SO FANTASTIC!!!!! It's a TOTAL RIDE!!!
I don't think its fair to artists to use the term "MASTERPIECE", because that implies that that's IT, but if I WAS the type to use that word, I'd be applying it here! This feels like her most fully realized, FULL-ON ANN, nobody else, intimate album!
⚡❤⚡ I LOVE IT!!! ⚡❤⚡ I'M WILD ABOUT IT!!! ⚡❤⚡
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Joe Edmonds

Psychedelic,whimsical,and wonderfully acted
the "if you like" correlatives (Syd,Nordine) are in the ballpark.I would throw in bits of Jim Morrison's spoken word bits,a soupcon of Hunky Dory, and the lone album by Lady June (Linguistic Leprosy-obscurity alert!),and just a tad of Tyrannosaurus Rex.Bongwater fans will approve.The music and arrangements beautifully backdrop Ms.Magnuson's wonderful vocals (both sung and spoken).Since Ann is a great actor she handles it all with aplomb and humor.I enjoyed it last evening at sunset,but recommended for anytime for those with a penchant for Ms.Magnuson's vision.She's a treasure.
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Michael Loris

"But a dream within a dream" - Edgar Allen Poe
There are people who might just as soon prefer to define the works of actress, singer, and performance artist Ann Magnuson as one-quarter pretty songbird, one-quarter occasional bit part Hollywood B-list actress, one-quarter music-art-film-society rag writer, and one-quarter drug culture-induced garrulous rant artist. Such people are complete idiots and could not be more wrong in such a simplified, generalized, basic assessment. Ann Magnuson the Woman is a hardworking, wartorn, triumphant earth mother and complex powerhouse while Ann Magnuson the Artist is a complex one-of-a-kind natural genius—as is proven yet again on her latest release, “Dream Girl” (released September 2016). This is a collection of recordings, both song and what I refer to as “beyond-spoken word”, that provides for us an apotheosis of some of the artist’s greatest strengths. As a creatively revolutionary master of the arts who remains a paragon (and idol!) for so many fledgling artistic visionaries who flock to New York to follow in her footsteps, year after year, Magnuson does not disappoint with “Dream Girl”. Each new track stimulates a stream of consciousness that ferries the listener down previously unexplored channels of thought that employ full use of both aural and visual faculties through the artist’s characterizations, vivid storytelling, and songs. Based on her real-life dreams, the piece as a whole serves as a resourceful tool for mesmerizing and inspiring the minds of all artists, young and old. The opening track, “We’re All Mad”, is the perfect storybook introduction, reminiscent of all the idyllic imagery representing archetypes from the cultural backstock of slides and moving pictures stored by our collective consciousness and it conjures forth images and thoughts of both the comic and the fantastic - the tragic and the mythical - the surreal, the contemporary, and the absurd - all from the outrageously mysterious creations made in the outer-realms of Magnuson's own mind and subconscious. At the mere mention of “hallowed trees with matted hair” and “goblets full of toadstool wine’, our dreammaster invites us into her halcyonic world with an ever- enchanting chorus (“These are the dreams we live in…”) and a musical orchestration that is faint with echoes of everything from the minstreling villagers of Scarborough Faire to the majesty of a fabled winged beast materializing like something right off the pages of the antiquated children's storybooks of yore, slowly awakening from its century-long slumber at dusk. Upon entering the world the artist evokes, one realizes that Magnuson nails it once again and the road ahead on this venture is going to be filled with excitement. From her duet with firecracker siren Kate Pierson (of the B-52s) on “Cat in the Sun” (believed to be an homage to her own recently departed feline companion, tapping upon the subject of transitioning and the possibility of what lies beyond this physical world as we know it) to our narrator being in love with her environs as she enters an illuminated green futuristic holographic safety zone of organic psilocybin in “The Enchanted Forest” (It begins with “I just heard that David Bowie is launching his new toyline, utilizing old imagery from his back catalogue…”), the listener becomes immersed in a freeflow of blissful locution that brings forth much more to be desired from Magnuson (DEMANDING A FOLLOW-UP SECOND DREAMS SESSIONS ALBUM NOW!). The soul of the album surfaces in character and in spirit with my personal favourite, “Dreams of the Everyday Housewife” in which Magnuson summons her octogenarian from within and meaningfully moans out a lamenting encapsulation of memories, broken dreams, lost opportunies, and lost loves. At the piano, foot pedals audible throughout the song, she shrinks into a bereaved point-of-view, looking back on a life that seems to have missed out on something important yet seems to relish roving over memories indicative of a life so fully lived. It is a song that can break anyone’s heart who has compassion for end-of-life regret, forlornment, and lost hopes. I cascade into tears with every listen. Whether a true Magnusonite or just an art junkie, everyone will be thrilled with the entire album as she has delivered a masterpiece. "Cobras in Love" is a delightfully hissy romp through the detailing of a dream about a 1950s-style monster movie about gigantic eyeless "sandworms" on the silver screen. Dreamologues (dream monologues) and theatrically heartfelt, ethereal tunes, telling us tales of the dreams and the imaginings of one of the greatest American visionaries ever, “Dream Girl” is one of Magnuson’s most intimately personal creations. The album ends with “Relieved To Be Irrelevant” (the title alone sums up what the nature of her DIY-grassroots-punk rock-ANTI-“stardom”-attitude and her inner truth are all about-- "irrelevant", she says, though I beg to differ). The legendary storytelling pixie-haired pioneer with 1,000 characters inside her takes us on a cosmic journey as we venture along with her in and out of her own dreams, Magnuson-style. You won’t be disappointed with “Dream Girl” – and in the words of Magnuson herself, “Dream on, dreamers.”
Read more...

Michael Loris

"All we see or seem is but a dream within a dream" - Edgar Allen Poe
There are people who might just as soon prefer to define the works of actress, singer, and performance artist Ann Magnuson as one-quarter pretty songbird, one-quarter occasional bit part Hollywood B-list actress, one-quarter music-art-film-society rag writer, and one-quarter drug culture-induced garrulous rant artist. Such people are complete idiots and could not be more wrong in such a simplified, generalized, basic assessment. Ann Magnuson the Woman is a hardworking, wartorn, triumphant earth mother and complex powerhouse while Ann Magnuson the Artist is a complex one-of-a-kind natural genius—as is proven yet again on her latest release, “Dream Girl” (released September 2016). This is a collection of recordings, both song and what I refer to as “beyond-spoken word”, that provides for us an apotheosis of some of the artist’s greatest strengths. As a creatively revolutionary master of the arts who remains a paragon (and idol!) for so many fledgling artistic visionaries who flock to New York to follow in her footsteps, year after year, Magnuson does not disappoint with “Dream Girl”. Each new track stimulates a stream of consciousness that ferries the listener down previously unexplored channels of thought that employ full use of both aural and visual faculties through the artist’s characterizations, vivid storytelling, and songs. Based on her real-life dreams, the piece as a whole serves as a resourceful tool for mesmerizing and inspiring the minds of all artists, young and old. The opening track, “We’re All Mad”, is the perfect storybook introduction, reminiscent of all the images from the cultural backstock of slides and moving pictures stored by our collective consciousness and it conjures forth images and thoughts of both the comic and the fantastic - the tragic and the mythical - the surreal, the contemporary, and the absurd - all from the outrageously mysterious creations made in the outer-realms of Magnuson's own mind and subconscious. At the mere mention of “hallowed trees with matted hair” and “goblets full of toadstool wine’, our dreammaster invites us into her halcyonic world with an ever- enchanting chorus (“These are the dreams we live in…”) and a musical orchestration that is faint with echoes of everything from the minstreling villagers of Scarborough Faire to the majesty of a fabled winged beast slowly awakening from its century-long slumber at dusk. Upon entering the world the artist evokes, one realizes that Magnuson nails it once again and the road ahead on this venture is going to be filled with excitement. From her duet with firecracker siren Kate Pierson (the B-52s) on “Cat in the Sun” (believed to be an homage to her own recently departed feline companion, tapping upon the subject of transitioning and the possibility of what lies beyond this physical world as we know it) to our narrator being in love with her environs as she enters an illuminated green futuristic holographic safety zone of organic psilocybin in “The Enchanted Forest” (It begins with “I just heard that David Bowie is launching his new toyline, utilizing old imagery from his back catalogue…”), the listener becomes immersed in a freeflow of blissful locution that brings forth much more to be desired from Magnuson (DEMANDING A FOLLOW-UP SECOND DREAMS SESSIONS ALBUM NOW!). The soul of the album surfaces in character and in spirit with my personal favourite, “Dreams of the Everyday Housewife” in which Magnuson summons her octogenarian from within and meaningfully moans out a lamenting encapsulation of memories, broken dreams, lost opportunies, and lost loves. At the piano, foot pedals audible throughout the song, she shrinks into a bereaved point-of-view, looking back on a life that seems to have missed out on something important yet seems to relish roving over memories indicative of a life so fully lived. It is a song that can break anyone’s heart who has compassion for end-of-life regret, forlornment, and lost hopes. I cascade into tears with every listen. Whether a true Magnusonite or just an art junkie, everyone will be thrilled with the entire album as she has delivered a masterpiece. "Cobras in Love" is a delightfully hissy romp through the detailing of a dream about a 1950s-style monster movie about gigantic eyeless "sandworms" on the silver screen. Dreamologues (dream monologues) and theatrically heartfelt, ethereal tunes, telling us tales of the dreams and the imaginings of one of the greatest American visionaries ever, “Dream Girl” is one of Magnuson’s most intimately personal creations. The album ends with “Relieved To Be Irrelevant” (the title alone sums up what the nature of her DIY-grassroots-punk rock-ANTI-“stardom”-attitude and her inner truth are all about-- "irrelevant", she says, though I beg to differ). The legendary storytelling pixie-haired pioneer with 1,000 characters inside her takes us on a cosmic journey as we venture along with her in and out of her own dreams, Magnuson-style. You won’t be disappointed with “Dream Girl” – and in the words of Magnuson herself, “Dream on, dreamers.”
Read more...