Bastion | The Honey Sacrifice

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
Audio Led Zeppelin Slave Stone Temple Pilots

Album Links
BASTION Bitmunk GreatIndieMusic GroupieTunes PassAlong Tradebit Audio Lunchbox MusicIsHere PayPlay Apple iTunes

More Artists From
United States - Kentucky

Other Genres You Will Love
Rock: Hard Rock Rock: Modern Rock Moods: Type: Sonic
Sell your music everywhere
There are no items in your wishlist.

The Honey Sacrifice

by Bastion

Rock music with big beats, strong melodies, infectious grooves and lots of attitude.
Genre: Rock: Hard Rock
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Continue Shopping
just a few left.
order now!
Share to Google +1

To listen to tracks you will need to update your browser to a recent version.

  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Last Request
BASTION
3:00 $0.99
clip
2. All That's Good
BASTION
3:40 $0.99
clip
3. Quilt Of Stains
BASTION
3:19 $0.99
clip
4. Scream With Me
BASTION
3:24 $0.99
clip
5. Blue
BASTION
3:58 $0.99
clip
6. Leave Her Alone
BASTION
3:35 $0.99
clip
7. The World That Owes Me
BASTION
3:40 $0.99
clip
8. Rusted
BASTION
3:53 $0.99
clip
9. Dirty Sheets
BASTION
3:25 $0.99
clip
10. Suffer
BASTION
3:49 $0.99
clip
11. Down
BASTION
4:16 $0.99
clip
12. Villain With Wings
BASTION
3:25 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Music is the by-product of a deeper purpose. Out of subconscious, experience, and the need to defend certain values, it is a bastion for the soul. - Unknown

The music of Bastion does serve a deeper purpose. Lead singer and bassist Brad Wilkins states "Our music reaches out to kids in high school, kids moving on to college, to kids in gangs and cults. It touches people who are searching, people who are pissed off - about life, about work, about not having enough money or enough sex. These are people who know about rejection. How do we communicate with them? We do it through our music."

Drummer Greg Slone adds, "Our music can be dark, tortured and angry, but it can also be energetic, powerful and uplifting. As in life, we explore and exploit the reality of many different moods."

Bastion was formed in 2001 by Brad Wilkins and Greg Slone. The two had worked together in the mid 90's in the rock band Havoc 9, and made a strong connection as performers and songwriters. The addition, in 2002 of Slone's long-time friend, guitarist Don Gauck, completed the lineup. "We're always on the same page whether we are talking about music, philosophy or business. There's a mutual respect between the three of us so compromise and sacrifice is never an issue." says Gauck.

The members of BASTION share a level of experience, training and camaraderie that is unique in the rock music industry today. The history these three share, their attention to detail and their degree of talent allows them to combine the best of various musical styles, but mostly the genres of hard rock and punk rock into the BASTION sound. Influences ranging from Led Zeppelin and The Cure to Soundgarden and Fugazi are all evident, but BASTION's unique, hard edged sound is purely a result of the talent and emotion Wilkins, Slone and Gauck bring to their songwriting and performance.

Each member is focused on the premise of writing, recording and performing original and powerful rock songs with strong melodies and lots of attitude. This dedication culminated in the release of the band's debut CD "The Honey Sacrifice" in May 2005. Critical acclaim for the album was followed with nominations from the Cincinnati Entertainment Awards for "Album of the Year" and "Best Rock Band of the Year".

The notoriety the album has received has spread BASTION's music across the country through the internet, radio, television and live performances. The band's growing popularity is due entirely to the member's success in achieving their ultimate goal - - to bring their sound to the many fans who find a part of themselves in the music that is BASTION.

Read more...

Reviews


to write a review

Ezra Waller

Great songs, great musicians, great CD!
With '80s new wave and punxploitation continuing to inform new music, Bastion is taking a forward-looking approach by mining the opposite end of that decade for influences. Their long awaited debut, The Honey Sacrifice, is strongly reminiscent of the genesis of mainstream alternative rock, with some shards of heavy metal thrown in for context. While not a completely novel sound, they do it so amazingly well that this disc is likely to become a treasured part of your CD collection, nestled right between the Jane's Addiction and Soundgarden discs.

Beyond being outstanding performers and songwriters, Bastion has an uncanny sense of both how to structure a song for optimum impact and how to mix them to maximize interest. It would be impossible for the band members to hide their Jazz and Fusion backgrounds. Most of their riffs and grooves are straightforward, but every so often you'll hear a lick or fill that hints at mastery beyond what 99% of rock musicians attain. The delicate playing on "Blue" and the syncopated labyrinth of "Leave Her Alone" are testaments to their sharp ears and ability to lock in on what another has played and instinctively add a complementary part.

Every track on every song on the disc is perfectly executed, from Greg Slone's machine gun snare roll that kick starts the album to the endless guitar and vocal layers that build upon one another in each arrangement. Although not impossibly dense, you can listen to the album through many times and hear something new in every song. Bastion's attention to detail shows in the tiny changes with each successive verse and chorus. With an added vocal part here or a different guitar lead there, the band has guaranteed that listener fatigue will not be a problem whether listening for the first time or the hundredth.

Incredibly, the disc is self-produced, with lead guitarist Don Gauck responsible for engineering and most of the interlocking composition. Bastion clearly has the ability to take a step away from their work and decide what needs to be done to serve their vision, more evidence of the extensive training and experience of the players, and also their history together. Although a debut album for the band, the material has been coalescing for many years. Knowing this, it's also miraculous that The Honey Sacrifice is so cohesive.

As the song titles would suggest, singer/guitarist Brad Wilkins' lyrical world is a dark and tortured place. The writing is very good, but his evocative delivery is the key to the vocals' success as centerpiece of the album. Much of the singing is subdued, and Wilkins' voice shimmers like Geoff Tate's in his gentler moments (don't worry, no wine-glass-shattering pitch exercises here). But when he cuts loose, his soulful screams are on par with Chris Cornell's. His range is impressive, and carefully crafted harmonies and echoing background vocals bolster each performance.

The lone complaint I have about Bastion's music - and this is hardly a criticism in the eyes of some - is that every song sounds like a single. Granted, this is the Holy Grail for airplay-seekers, but for a band with this degree of talent in performance and composition, you know they could write some amazing Prog Rock. If an eight minute opus or two is too much to ask, maybe an instrumental or at the very least an oddball intro or interlude? It's okay to be a little self-indulgent, most everybody's favorite bands have done it, and few complain.

On a similar note, there is an amazing amount of tasty lead on The Honey Sacrifice, but few actual guitar solos, and those that are there ("Scream With Me," "The World That Owes Me," "Dirty Sheets") are very understated. Having heard this and some of Gauck's other work, it's obvious that he's got the creativity and chops to absolutely wail, but again, I suspect the pursuit of the pinnacle of listener friendliness has tempered the work. There is no arguing that Bastion has mastered the art of the fastball hook. Now it's time for them to loosen up and throw a few curves.
Read more...