Bob Webb | Bank Trollers: Songs of the Sea

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
Gordon Bok John Roberts & Tony Barrand Stan Hugill

Album Links
Bob Webb

More Artists From
United States - Maine

Other Genres You Will Love
Folk: Traditional Folk Folk: Modern Folk Moods: Type: Acoustic
Sell your music everywhere
There are no items in your wishlist.

Bank Trollers: Songs of the Sea

by Bob Webb

Traditional and modern songs and shanties of the sea with guitar, 5-string banjo, MacCann-duet concertina, banza, mandolin, and harmonica.
Genre: Folk: Traditional Folk
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Sign up for the CD Baby Newsletter
Your email address will not be sold for any reason.
Continue Shopping
just a few left.
order now!
Share to Google +1

To listen to tracks you will need to update your browser to a recent version.

  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. The Lucy Foster
3:37 $0.99
clip
2. Oda G.
2:17 $0.99
clip
3. Ilo Man
2:07 $0.99
clip
4. Towrope Gals
3:41 $0.99
clip
5. Women's the Joy and the Pride of the Land
1:58 $0.99
clip
6. Believe Me, Dearest Susan
3:00 $0.99
clip
7. Napoleon's Farewell to Paris
3:44 $0.99
clip
8. Bonaparte's Retreat
2:50 $0.99
clip
9. The Schooner
2:05 $0.99
clip
10. I'm Alone
5:13 $0.99
clip
11. Handsome Molly
2:17 $0.99
clip
12. Dance Gals, Gimme the Banjo
0:53 $0.99
clip
13. Alabama John Cherokee
2:15 $0.99
clip
14. Bank Trollers
3:39 $0.99
clip
15. Protect the Innocent / Tilden
3:48 $0.99
clip
16. Cape Town Bound
3:07 $0.99
clip
17. 150 Days out from Vancouver
2:52 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Bob Webb's CD "Bank Trollers" celebrates seafaring from the early 19th century to modern times, featuring traditional shanties and songs of mariners under sail, as well as 20th-Century songs of commercial fishing and towboating. Bob accompanies himself on the guitar and banjo, as well as the rare duet-concertina and the gourd-bodied banza, a precursor to the modern-day banjo. There is a handsome duet between Ann Cook's beautiful violin-playing and Bob's 1852 Martin guitar with gut strings. Webb's vocal solos are augmented by a chorus including legendary folksingers Louis Killen and Jeff Warner, with Ann Cook, Diana Hansen, Dave Peloquin, and Helen Richmond Webb.

Bob began singing folk songs in 1963. During the early 1970s he owned The Heritage, the folk-music club in San Diego, California where singer-songwriter Tom Waits began his career. Bob later toured with Waits for two national tours. In 1972 Bob won the professional old-time banjo category at the legendary Topanga Banjo & Fiddle Contest, and during 1973-7 he performed regularly with his True & Trembling String Band. He studied ethnomusicology with Bess Lomax Hawes, daughter of the famous folksong scholar John Lomax, and later served as a director of the Vancouver (Canada) Folk Song Society.

He still performs old-time banjo and guitar music, but is also celebrated for his renditions of shipboard work songs, known as "shanties," and off-watch sailors' favorites known as "forebitters." He has been dubbed "King of the Shanty" as a result of personal appearances across Europe and the United Kingdom.

He has shared the stage with Doc Watson, Elizabeth Cotten, Mike Seeger, Gordon Bok, Brownie McGhee & Sonny Terry, and Mamadou Diabaté. He learned some of his guitar technique from, and occasionally accompanied Mississippi bluesman Sam Chatmon (1897-1983). Much of his maritime artistry came directly from Stan Hugill (1906-92), the last sailor from the age of merchant sail to publicly present the shanties he used to coordinate labor at sea.

He has written several books, including "Sailor-Painter: The Uncommon Life of Charles Robert Patterson" (Flat Hammock Press, 2005), "Ring The Banjar!: The Banjo in America from Folklore to Factory" (Centerstream Press, 1996), and "On the Northwest: Commercial Whaling in the Pacific Northwest 1790-1967" (University of British Columbia Press, 1988).

Read more...

Reviews


to write a review