Caroline Doctorow | Little Lovin' Darling

Go To Artist Page

More Artists From
United States - New York

Other Genres You Will Love
Folk: Folk Pop Country: Americana Moods: Solo Female Artist
Sell your music everywhere
There are no items in your wishlist.

Little Lovin' Darling

by Caroline Doctorow

One half Donovan inspired and the other half Hank Williams lonesome. This is a collection of ten new original songs and also includes a cover of Snowbird. Produced by Pete Kennedy. Appearances by Russ Seeger, Inda Eaton, Barbara Lamb and Gary Oleya
Genre: Folk: Folk Pop
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Continue Shopping
available for download only
Share to Google +1

To listen to tracks you will need to update your browser to a recent version.

  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. That's How
3:21 album only
clip
2. Something Pulls Me to You
4:21 album only
clip
3. Cactus Flower
3:47 album only
clip
4. I'll Outrun You Bye and Bye
3:23 album only
5. Lucky and Saved
3:33 album only
clip
6. Snowbird
3:08 album only
clip
7. My Sunday House
5:12 album only
clip
8. Little Lovin' Darling
4:31 album only
9. The Ballad Maker
4:18 album only
clip
10. Southern Skies
5:07 album only
clip
11. Looks Like Christmas
4:55 album only
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
THE SONG STANDS ALONE/EAST HAMPTON STAR

“I wanted a happier album,” Caroline Doctorow said, “which means a stronger back beat, and that leads to Americana.”
By Baylis Greene | May 7, 2013 - 11:12am

Caroline Doctorow, an East Coast Iris DeMent, has a new album coming out. Morgan McGivern
You think you know Caroline Doctorow? “Something Pulls Me to You,” the opening track of the singer-songwriter’s new album, leaves behind flowery folk for Hank Williams lonesome. Backed by the loping twang of Pete Kennedy’s guitar, it calls to mind hunched patrons at a late-night New Mexico roadside diner, nursing their sorrows as much as their coffee cups.
“I am a lovesick fool,” the speaker laments, making plain that she’s not giving up on her obsession: “My will is just the dust underneath the wheels of a wrong turn / And losing is just the closing of the day.” Caution? “Just a highway sign rolling by too fast.”
“This one’s more Americana,” Ms. Doctorow said of the album, “Little Lovin’ Darling,” due out this summer. “People listen to music differently now,” picking and choosing a song here and there to download. This saddens her, as a fan of the long-playing album, and yet in a way frees her. “For the first time I didn’t even think of a theme.”
Her most recent releases have them, or, better yet, were concept albums. Last year she came out with a Mary McCaslin retrospective, “I Carry All I Own,” and before that were albums exploring the lives of the ’60s folk singers Richard and Mimi Farina: “Carmel Valley Ride,” “a song cycle about them from an outsider’s perspective,” as she put it, and a remarkably well-received collection of their songs, “Another Country.”
With the new release, “I thought each song could be like a mini opera, in a way. Each song could stand alone.” Music fans can embrace the cultural atomization, as they increasingly have to do, or, for an old-fashioned live show, there’s the Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett tomorrow at 8 p.m., where, with her band, the Steamrollers, she’ll be performing on a bill with the folk rock duo the Kennedys — Pete, the guitarist who produced “Little Lovin’ Darling,” and Maura.
In spite of the pining heart that opens the disc, “I wanted a happier album,” Ms. Doctorow said, “which means a stronger back beat, and that leads to Americana.”
Her pursuit of happiness, though, led her across the pond, to one of the sunniest musicians around. Some of her songs are “very Donovan-inspired,” she said — “Cactus Flower,” for one, a chiming jaunt through the desert: “Listen closely to the kaleidoscope sound / Rainbow colors all around.”
“I don’t have a rock ’n’ roll voice,” she said of the suitability of the Scottish troubadour’s music. “I’ve always loved Donovan, but he was overshadowed by Bob Dylan.” (As the Sag Harbor filmmaker D.A. Pennebaker’s 1967 documentary, “Don’t Look Back,” famously attests.)
The show tomorrow night, tickets to which cost $15, will be a friendly affair, with each performer sitting in with the other. Ms. Doctorow’s collaborations with the Kennedys, Nanci Griffith’s backup band, date to 2008, when she recruited them for “Another Country.”
“There was no retrospective of Richard Farina’s work,” Ms. Doctorow said, which was surprising given his fame and influence. He died in a motorcycle accident in California in 1966. He was all of 29 years old and had written a novel, “Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me,” that ranks with Jeremy Larner’s “Drive, He Said” among the better documents of the era and college life at the time.
Mimi Farina, however, Joan Baez’s younger sister, lived until 2001, and one of the elements of her life that interested Ms. Doctorow was the way she watched her dead husband become slowly mythologized.
In working on that project, the Kennedys lived for a month in a recording studio, Narrow Lane Studios, in an outbuilding on Ms. Doctorow’s property in Bridgehampton. “I had never met them.” Ms. Doctorow has two daughters. “We all got along so well.”
They’ll be going separate ways for the summer, with the Kennedys touring Europe and Ms. Doctorow moving on to bigger venues, among them a 500-seater on July 14 in Chautauqua upstate.

Read more...

Reviews


to write a review

Robert Ottone

Caroline Doctorow's Little Lovin' Darling
AUGUST 25, 2013 BY ROBERT OTTONE
Caroline Doctorow’s music has a way of transcending that feeling of place. For example, one of the songs from her new album Little Lovin’ Darling, produced by Pete Kennedy, is called “Cactus Flower” and its melodic vibe carries the listener through western-inspired themes. Some of the lyrics include: “Just to ride around with you, from the trailer bed, I can see the stars, coyote calls in the night sky, like the white dove, I wear wings, I don’t want this canyon road to ever end.” Her music evokes a feeling of western wanderlust, while also presenting folk-inspired ideas unique to a Long Islander. I chatted with Doctorow about the new album, her career and her folk/country-inspired approach to songwriting.

“I guess my sound is sort of a folk-Americana sound, rooted in the artists I was influenced by, the songwriters of the ’60s. Particularly for this record—Donovan. The record kind of has a split personality. It’s half-Donovan, half-Hank Williams,” Doctorow said.

“I’ve always been a sucker for Donovan. While listening to tracks off Little Lovin’ Darling with some friends, we found ourselves chatting about folk music and the music of the ’60s,” the very music Doctorow claims influences her. It’s almost like her latest album serves as a journey down the rabbit hole for ’60s and early ’70s musical discussion, while also serving as a modern reminder of the era of genuine songwriters.

“I’m very interested in songwriting. Maybe other people do crossword puzzles or play card games. I like pushing lyrics around on a page. I find that compelling, so that’s the muse I follow more than any other,” Doctorow said.

While that country connection is strong, there’s also a very heavy Long Island influence in Doctorow’s sound, like in “Big Duck Ramble”—“In the town of Flanders on a highway road, out on Route 24, there sits a famous sight to behold, I’m telling you now if you’ve never been told,” are some of the lyrics. “One of the things about this area and how it helps a working musician better than, for instance, New York City, is that this area has always been so welcoming and supportive of my work,” Doctorow noted.

Doctorow has been performing as part of the Montauk Summer Concert Series, and will perform at Dan’s Papers Annual Literary Prize ceremony at Guild Hall on August 26. “My music is lyric-based. The lyrics come first, the rhythm second. No matter where I am, if that’s the kind of room I’m playing, I’ll be happy,” Doctorow said. “I’m excited about the Dan’s Papers Literary Prize ceremony! This is maybe my eighth or ninth year playing the Summer Concert Series. Montauk is a great
music town.”

Little Lovin’ Darling evokes a lot of feelings. I was curious where Doctorow wanted to take listeners with the new album. “My last album was a retrospective of folk icon Mary McCaslin, so I presented her songs and I just wanted to make a summer record, something upbeat. Because of the dial of my voice and because I love Donovan, that was the direction I was pulled in. He has a certain groove and is upbeat without being a total rocker,” Doctorow said. “Presenting the two different lyrical styles, Hank Williams and Donovan, was an interesting combination.”

Doctorow said, “We’re so lucky to live in a community packed with so many great musicians, where the people are supportive of the arts and institutions like Dan’s Papers and our local radio stations. The Hamptons became the Hamptons when painters settled here because of the quality of life. The way the sea meets the land; the landscape itself creates this beautiful soft light you really can’t find anywhere else on the planet. It’s a very supportive cocoon for us musicians. I’m so happy to live here with my family.”
Read more...

Robert Ottone

Caroline Doctorow's Little Lovin' Darling
AUGUST 25, 2013 BY ROBERT OTTONE
Caroline Doctorow’s music has a way of transcending that feeling of place. For example, one of the songs from her new album Little Lovin’ Darling, produced by Pete Kennedy, is called “Cactus Flower” and its melodic vibe carries the listener through western-inspired themes. Some of the lyrics include: “Just to ride around with you, from the trailer bed, I can see the stars, coyote calls in the night sky, like the white dove, I wear wings, I don’t want this canyon road to ever end.” Her music evokes a feeling of western wanderlust, while also presenting folk-inspired ideas unique to a Long Islander. I chatted with Doctorow about the new album, her career and her folk/country-inspired approach to songwriting.

“I guess my sound is sort of a folk-Americana sound, rooted in the artists I was influenced by, the songwriters of the ’60s. Particularly for this record—Donovan. The record kind of has a split personality. It’s half-Donovan, half-Hank Williams,” Doctorow said.

“I’ve always been a sucker for Donovan. While listening to tracks off Little Lovin’ Darling with some friends, we found ourselves chatting about folk music and the music of the ’60s,” the very music Doctorow claims influences her. It’s almost like her latest album serves as a journey down the rabbit hole for ’60s and early ’70s musical discussion, while also serving as a modern reminder of the era of genuine songwriters.

“I’m very interested in songwriting. Maybe other people do crossword puzzles or play card games. I like pushing lyrics around on a page. I find that compelling, so that’s the muse I follow more than any other,” Doctorow said.

While that country connection is strong, there’s also a very heavy Long Island influence in Doctorow’s sound, like in “Big Duck Ramble”—“In the town of Flanders on a highway road, out on Route 24, there sits a famous sight to behold, I’m telling you now if you’ve never been told,” are some of the lyrics. “One of the things about this area and how it helps a working musician better than, for instance, New York City, is that this area has always been so welcoming and supportive of my work,” Doctorow noted.

Doctorow has been performing as part of the Montauk Summer Concert Series, and will perform at Dan’s Papers Annual Literary Prize ceremony at Guild Hall on August 26. “My music is lyric-based. The lyrics come first, the rhythm second. No matter where I am, if that’s the kind of room I’m playing, I’ll be happy,” Doctorow said. “I’m excited about the Dan’s Papers Literary Prize ceremony! This is maybe my eighth or ninth year playing the Summer Concert Series. Montauk is a great
music town.”

Little Lovin’ Darling evokes a lot of feelings. I was curious where Doctorow wanted to take listeners with the new album. “My last album was a retrospective of folk icon Mary McCaslin, so I presented her songs and I just wanted to make a summer record, something upbeat. Because of the dial of my voice and because I love Donovan, that was the direction I was pulled in. He has a certain groove and is upbeat without being a total rocker,” Doctorow said. “Presenting the two different lyrical styles, Hank Williams and Donovan, was an interesting combination.”

Doctorow said, “We’re so lucky to live in a community packed with so many great musicians, where the people are supportive of the arts and institutions like Dan’s Papers and our local radio stations. The Hamptons became the Hamptons when painters settled here because of the quality of life. The way the sea meets the land; the landscape itself creates this beautiful soft light you really can’t find anywhere else on the planet. It’s a very supportive cocoon for us musicians. I’m so happy to live here with my family.”
Read more...

Beth Young

Caroline Doctorow’s “Little Lovin’ Darling”: Electric sitars and southern skies
Bridgehampton musician Caroline Doctorow has always been a student of the folk process, in which the heritage of stories and songs are carefully studied and expanded upon by newer generations of folk artists.

She aptly describes her new album, “Little Lovin’ Darling,” released June 29, as “one part Donovan wannabe and the other part Hank Williams lonesome,” but the music on this record, in true folk process style, runs the gamut of influences, some folk and some not, from The Incredible String Band to the Hollies to Woody Guthrie.

“Donovan is considered a folk artist, but he was able to come up with real rocking tunes in a real folk kind of way,” she said in a recent interview with the Beacon.

This is Ms. Doctorow’s ninth studio album, and her fourth produced by Pete Kennedy in Ms. Doctorow’s Narrow Lane Studios in Bridgehampton. Though Ms. Doctorow has a full touring band, the Steamrollers, with a shifting lineup of solid musicians, Mr. Kennedy does a good deal of the playing on the record: guitars, bass, organ, drums and electric sitar.

“I was ready to make a happier album. I don’t have a rock and roll voice, so I tried to cop Donovan’s grooves as a psychedelic folk rocker,” said Ms. Doctorow. “I really love his lyrics and I thought it was a good genre to try to make a contribution to. I find myself really drawn to lyrics. That’s what I think about first. Hank Williams was a master of that.”

Ms. Doctorow has long released albums that were song cycles, all focused on a single theme, as in her 2009 release, “Another Country,” of songs written by Richard and Mimi Fariña or her release last year of “I Carry All I Own,” an homage to Mary McCaslin.

“It’s part of a series with Pete Kennedy to showcase important American songwriters around the 1960s,” she said. “Mary McCaslin’s work is really important in folk history. Her theme was the American west and disillusionment with it. It’s mellowed to be an anthem for conservation. Her song “Dust Devils” really echoes a global warming theme, but it was written 40 years ago.”


“Little Lovin’ Darling”

With this new record, Ms. Doctorow said, she thought hard about how people now purchase single songs on iTunes, not entire albums, and decided to focus less on the album as a whole than on the individual songs.

“It frees you to not really think so much about a concept,” she said.

But the themes of loneliness, of love and of the west are still evident in everything she does.

“A lot of the songs are love songs, but they’re at many different stages of love,” she said. “I titled the record “Little Lovin’ Darling,” but the darling isn’t such a darling and the love isn’t such a little love. People are very complicated.”

“Little Lovin’ Darling” begins on a psychedelic note. Mr. Kennedy brings out the electric sitar early on the opening track, “That’s How,” about a woman promising to miss her lover when he’s gone. The psychedelia turns up a notch on “Cactus Flower,” perhaps the most Donovan-inspired song on the record.

By the fourth song, “I’ll Outrun You Bye and Bye,” Ms. Doctorow has slipped into a country groove, helped along by an eerie twangy bass line and fellow songwriter Inda Eaton’s harmony vocals.

From there in, the album becomes more tender, the songs seem more personal, and Ms. Doctorow’s lyricism shines, particularly in “My Sunday House,” an homage to Ms. Eaton’s touring RV, named Delmer, which has become famous in the music community of the East End. Ms. Eaton took Delmer across the country to Los Angeles for her “Go West” tour last year.

“When you do a tour like that with your fellow musicians, it becomes your home and religion,” said Ms. Doctorow. “It becomes your Sunday house. You have your family rituals there, whatever it is you chose to observe. That’s a very cherished home.”


Caroline Doctorow, Inda Eaton and Russ Seeger during a recording session for “Little Lovin’ Darling” at Narrow Lane Studios in Bridgehampton.

The album stays dust-bowl lonesome from that point out, with an homage to the populism of Woody Guthrie, “The Ballad Maker,” who said “the world is the music and the people are the song,” and in “Southern Skies,” a love song set among drops of rain on the Kansas dirt, “driving through the Smoky Mountains/heading through Monroe and then Jackson/you forget your anger and your sadness/when you cross that bridge on big Lake Pontchartrain.”

“”You got eyes like southern skies and i got lost in them,” she sings. It’s a sly country hook of a line, sincerely sung and heart-piercing.

“I’ve been playing in New Orleans a couple times a year. It’s such a magical place, musically and otherwise,” she said. “Music takes me on the road occasionally, and when it does, I can better enjoy the close knit musical community at home.”

Ms. Doctorow said she feels fortunate to be a part of a thriving music scene on the East End, though she’s seen scenes come and go throughout her career.

“Enjoy it while it lasts,” she said. “I don’t really know what happened in the cosmos, but something did and the music community out here is just thriving. Everybody is supportive of one another.”

“Little Lovin’ Darling” is available on iTunes here, on Amazon here and on CD Baby here.

Ms. Doctorow will have her CD with her at a full slate of summer shows, including a songwriters in the round session with Inda Eaton and Hugh Prestwood at Riverhead’s Suffolk Theater on Aug. 15.

“It’s going to be on WPKN a week later, like an old fashioned live radio show,” she said.
More information on Caroline Doctorow’s upcoming shows is available on her website
Read more...

Bill Concord

Little Lovin' Darling #18 WESU July 20
http://wesufm.org/the-stepkids-win-the-wesu-lottery/
Read more...