Order 3 or more physical items and get 1¢ shipping
Cameron Ember | What All Schoolchildren Learn

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
Lori Carson Low Red House Painters

Album Links
WEBSITE

More Artists From
United States - California - SF

Other Genres You Will Love
Rock: Lo-Fi Rock: Shoegaze Moods: Solo Female Artist
There are no items in your wishlist.

What All Schoolchildren Learn

by Cameron Ember

This is down-tempo confessional rock but includes alternative, indie, low-fi, and folk rock genres/influence. Both sad and hopeful, this album was engineered and recorded in her living room.
Genre: Rock: Lo-Fi
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Sign up for the CD Baby Newsletter
Your email address will not be sold for any reason.
Continue Shopping
just a few left.
order now!
Share to Google +1

To listen to tracks you will need to update your browser to a recent version.

  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Mourning Song
3:05 $0.99
clip
2. Southern Drive-Thru
3:59 $0.99
clip
3. Radish
2:29 $0.99
clip
4. On the Beach
2:43 $0.99
clip
5. Nun's the Word
3:30 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Cameron Ember was born in DC and grew up near the DCHardcore scene. She moved to San Francisco in 1990 and went to art school for 7 years, eventually making music videos as her thesis.

She returned to San Francisco in 1997 and soon finished her first album, Sea Creature. Later bands included Ocean8 and the Embers before she committed to being a solo act, as Cameron Ember.

Her collaboration with Erik Ian Walker was included in the soundtrack to "The Center of the World" and her Ocean8 track was included on a Cleopatra Records compilation called "The Unquiet Grave III.

Cameron Ember is down-tempo, low-fi indie rock in the vein of Low and Red House Painters (her drummer since 1997 is from the latter band). Her vocals and lyrics are both sad and hopeful, sometimes confessional and often (borrowing from the folk tradition) in the voice of other people, either imagined or real.

Read more...

Reviews


to write a review