Charlie Walden | Missouri Fiddle Tunes - Vol. 1

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Missouri Fiddle Tunes - Vol. 1

by Charlie Walden

Missouri fiddle tunes played fast & slow so you can learn them.
Genre: Country: Old-Timey
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Tune-Up
0:16 $0.99
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2. A&E Waltz
1:29 $0.99
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3. Angus Campbell
0:44 $0.99
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4. Angus Campbell - Slow
0:46 $0.99
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5. Arkansas Traveler
1:34 $0.99
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6. Arkansas Traveler - Slow
1:06 $0.99
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7. Bill Cheatum
0:44 $0.99
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8. Bill Cheatum - Slow
1:17 $0.99
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9. Billy in the Low Ground
0:49 $0.99
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10. Bill in the Low Ground - Slow
0:44 $0.99
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11. Black Velvet Waltz
0:50 $0.99
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12. Brickyard Joe
1:03 $0.99
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13. Brickyard Joe - Slow
1:04 $0.99
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14. Caton's Hornpipe (Katon's or Jeff City)
1:03 $0.99
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15. Caton's Hornpipe - Slow
0:39 $0.99
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16. Clark's Waltz
1:01 $0.99
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17. Coming Down from Denver
0:48 $0.99
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18. Coming Down from Denver - Slow
1:21 $0.99
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19. Country Waltz
0:55 $0.99
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20. Cowboy Waltz
1:14 $0.99
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21. Devil's Dream
0:49 $0.99
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22. Devil's Dream - Slow
1:13 $0.99
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23. Down Home Rag
0:55 $0.99
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24. Down Home Rag - Slow
0:54 $0.99
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25. Down Yonder
0:51 $0.99
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26. Durang's Hornpipe
0:52 $0.99
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27. Durang's Hornpipe - Slow
0:44 $0.99
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28. East Tennessee Blues
0:45 $0.99
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29. East Tennessee Blues - Slow
1:08 $0.99
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30. Eighth of January
0:40 $0.99
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31. Eighth of January - Slow
0:38 $0.99
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32. Fever in the South
0:48 $0.99
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33. Fever in the South - Slow
1:10 $0.99
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34. Fiddler's Dream
0:51 $0.99
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35. Fiddler's Dream - Slow
0:48 $0.99
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36. Fire on the Mountain
0:43 $0.99
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37. Fire on the Mountain - Slow
0:37 $0.99
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38. Fisher's Hornpipe
0:45 $0.99
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39. Fisher's Hornpipe - Slow
0:47 $0.99
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40. Flop Eared Mule
0:53 $0.99
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41. Flop Eared Mule - Slow
0:38 $0.99
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42. Ford One Step
0:53 $0.99
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43. Forked Deer
0:43 $0.99
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44. Forked Deer - Slow
1:04 $0.99
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45. Golden Slippers
0:43 $0.99
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46. Goodnight Waltz
1:50 $0.99
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47. Granny Will Your Dog Bite
0:45 $0.99
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48. Granny Will Your Dog Bite - Slow
0:32 $0.99
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49. Haste to the Wedding
1:02 $0.99
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50. Haste to the Wedding - Slow
0:30 $0.99
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51. All Smiles Tonight
0:46 $0.99
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52. Lamplighter's Hornpipe
0:43 $0.99
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53. Lamplighter's Hornpipe - Slow
0:30 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Fiddle-meister Charlie Walden plays 32 Missouri-style fiddle tunes one time through fast and then slower so you can learn them. No accompaniment so you can hear clearly. The original recording has been around for nearly 20 years. Many of my students have used it as a guide to building repertoire and technique in playing Show-Me style fiddling. I’ve always contended that anyone who wants to fiddle should school themselves in the “standards” and many of these are presented herein.

A & E Waltz – This waltz came from Taylor McBaine of Columbia, MO. I suspect Taylor learned this from some recording or other. In the early ’60 several Missouri fiddlers trekked out west to the National Fiddle Championship in Weiser, ID. They undoubtedly brought back some of those American Heritage fiddle LPs. Taylor had a copy of the Lloyd Wanzer LP Waltz Wonderland and I think he learned the tune from that recording. Wanzer was from Idaho and among the kingpins in early days of the Weiser contest.

Angus Campbell – An old Scottish reel that was played by most of the fiddlers around mid-Missouri and in the Missouri Valley region. This version was learned from Cyril Stinnett from Oregon, MO. Several Missouri fiddlers I knew had copies of a K-TEL record called “25 Old Time Fiddle Hits”. This LP was sold over television and featured a variety of unidentified fiddlers from Nashville and Canada. Angus Campbell was on this record and it’s my guess that this might be the origin of the tune among the fiddlers I knew playing it.

Arkansas Traveler – This is a classic fiddle piece that everyone should know. I’ve also included a transcription with the high part played low and the low part played high. I heard Kelly Jones of Vienna, MO, do this in fiddle contests to good effect on many occasions.

Bill Cheatum – This is another classic that everyone should know. The version presented here is fairly generic. The best Missouri rendition I ever heard was by Pete McMahan of Harrisburg.

Billy in the Lowground – This is another great fiddle piece that should be high on any list of important old-time fiddle tunes. I learned this rendition from Cyril Stinnett.

Black Velvet Waltz – This is a waltz of Canadian origin that I learned from Jake Hockemeyer of Mokane, MO. It appears on the K-TEL record and was recorded by numerous Canadian fiddlers in the 1960s.

Brickyard Joe – This piece comes from the playing of Lyman Enloe as he learned it from Tony Gilmore of Jefferson City. It was recorded on an early 78 rpm record by Doc Roberts and this may be the original source of the tune.

Caton's Hornpipe (a.k.a. Jeff City or Katon’s Hornpipe) – Bill Caton was a black fiddler from Tebbbetts in Mid-Missouri. He performed over radio station WOS in Jefferson City during the 1920s with his guitarist and sidekick Ola Gathright. This tune had vanished from the scene, but was brought back from extinction when published in R. P. Christeson’s Old Time Fiddler’s Repertory (University of Missouri Press, 1973). The tune has attained considerable popularity among younger fiddlers throughout the Midwest and eastern United States.

Clark's Waltz – This is a Pete McMahan tune which he attributed to his mentor Clark Atterbury, a farmer and fiddler who resided at Portland, MO. I heard Pete play this in a lot of contests.

Comin' Down From Denver – This was a popular tune in Mid-Missouri and often performed by Taylor McBaine and Jake Hockemeyer.

Country Waltz – This is another tune which most likely came into Missouri via Canadian vinyl. I learned it from Cyril Stinnett. This is on the K-TEL record.

Cowboy Waltz – This is Cyril’s version of the tune.




Devil's Dream – This is a generic rendition of a tune that every fiddler should know. This tune appears in Cole’s 1000 Fiddle Tunes (M. M. Cole Publishing, Chicago), an out of print volume that has been reissued by Mel Bay Publishing (Kirkwood, MO) under in it’s original incarnation as Ryan’s Mammoth Collection. It would be hard to overstate the importance of the Cole book to the development of the fiddle repertoire in Missouri, especially around Columbia. Dozens of tunes came from this source as performed by Taylor McBaine, Pete McMahan and Cleo Persinger and players in the generation before them such as George Morris, Luther Caldwell, Ed Tharp and others. Taylor McBaine, kept a copy right on his nightstand, despite that he claimed to not read a note.

Down Home Rag – This tune is from the playing of Lyman Enloe. Lyman was a fiddler originally from around Eldon in the Central Ozarks. A top-flight hoe-down player, in his later years he lived near Kansas City and fell-in with the Bluegrass Association. His hard-driving style fit nicely in a Blue Grass setting and as a result he became quite popular playing with this group. The tune employs the “double-shuffle”. I’ve done my best to notate this so the transcription might be helpful for anyone who has been struggling to figure out this little trick.

Down Yonder – Every fiddler should know this old piece, so here ‘tis.

Durang's Hornpipe – This tune appears is among the most widespread and appears in many 19th century fiddle collections. The version here is somewhat middle-of-the-road, especially on the 2nd part as there has been as many renditions of this tune as there have been performers over the years.

East Tennessee Blues – This tune is attributed to Fiddlin’ Arthur Smith. Similar to Clark Kessinger’s Poca River Blues and also recorded as Kelly Boy Rag.

Eighth of January – This tune is thought to commemorate Andrew Jackson’s victory of the British in New Orleans during the War of 1812. It’s a good tune for a square dance.

Fever in the South – This tune comes from Vee Latty of Fulton, MO, another performer over WOS Radio during the 1920s. It has a bit of a raggey feel.

Fiddler's Dream – This another tune attributable to Fiddlin’ Arthur Smith. This version is a little bit Cyril Stinnet and little bit Pete McMahan.

Fire on the Mountain – This tune was played by Jake Hockemeyer.

Fisher's Hornpipe – This tune is most often heard in the key of D, but most Missouri fiddlers play it in F, the original key in which it was published. Jake Hockemeyer and Cyril Stinnett (both lefties, by the way) had particularly nice renditions.

Flop-Eared Mule – The version played here is close to what I learned from Pete McMahan. He called it Peach Tree Limb and attributed it to Ed Tharp, a well-known fiddler from Columbia, MO.

Ford One Step – This is another Pete McMahan tune.

Forked Deer – This is a standard the every fiddler should know.

Golden Slippers – This tune was often played at dances when a couple dance (a.k.a. “belly-rubbin” music) was requested. It can also be used for square dance.

Goodnight Waltz – This waltz was played by many old time fiddlers in Mid-Missouri. I learned this version from R. P. Christeson.

Granny Will Your Dog Bite – This tune was popular up in the Missouri Valley Region. I actually learned this from a recording of Bob Walters of Nebraska.
Haste to the Wedding – This tune in 6/8 time could be called a jig or quadrille (the latter term being popular in the Missouri Valley Region). Tunes in 6/8 time are not common in Missouri, but of those that are played Haste to the Wedding and Irish Washerwoman were collected often and one or both was know by most old-timers.

I'll Be All Smiles Tonight – This is an old song in ¾ time which works well for dancing.

Lamplighter's Hornpipe – I learned this one from Cyril Stinnett. It is one of many 19th century “book” tunes played by Missouri fiddlers. It appears in Cole’s.

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