Christopher Lapina | Eclectic Eve

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New Age: Contemporary Instrumental Jazz: Crossover Jazz Moods: Instrumental
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Eclectic Eve

by Christopher Lapina

Dramatic and intimate, a story of love and transformation blending elements of jazz, scat and new age featuring acoustic and electronic instruments.
Genre: New Age: Contemporary Instrumental
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Highland Return (Feat. Ron Baggerman)
4:21 $0.99
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2. Hand in Glove (Feat. John Emrich)
5:22 $0.99
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3. Rolling Blue
6:02 $0.99
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4. This Time (Feat. Suzanne Orban)
7:18 $0.99
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5. Highland Variation # 9
3:16 $0.99
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6. Before You (Feat. Suzanne Orban)
4:05 $0.99
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7. My Darling Esmerelda (Feat. Ron Baggerman and Phil McCusker)
5:38 $0.99
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8. Lucy Turns Eclectic
4:22 $0.99
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9. Highland Variation # 1 (Feat. Suzanne Orban)
2:55 $0.99
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10. Moon and Spoon (Feat. Ronald Chiles)
4:42 $0.99
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11. String Theory
4:55 $0.99
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12. She's Often Here
1:56 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
“Life should be a transcendent journey of exploration with hope for enlightenment and clues to the meaning of time,” states composer/keyboardist Christopher Lapina. On his mostly instrumental album, Eclectic Eve, Lapina musically tells the tale of a woman making her life trek and succeeding in becoming a more knowledgeable, creative and well-rounded person.
The music on Eclectic Eve includes new age, minimalism, neo-classical, jazz, ambient, cello with piano or synth, solo piano, shifting-time-signatures, percussion-only, swinging-choral, and some ensemble pieces with guitars, bass and sax. Much of Lapina’s love of eclecticism comes from his study and appreciation of pianists and composers such as modern-music pioneers Erik Satie, Henry Cowell, Edgard Varese and John Cage. Lapina’s style is summed up by the definition of “eclectic” -- “selecting what appears to be best in various doctrines, methods or styles; or composed of elements drawn from various sources.”
On Eclectic Eve Lapina is joined by a variety of accomplished musicians. These include Ron Baggerman on the BO-EL seven-string guitar (he is a recording artist based in The Netherlands who has played with Chris Hinze and Kai Kurosawa), Phil McCusker on hollow-body electric guitar (Bruce Hornsby, Chris Botti, Diana Ross, George Duke), and bassist Dallas Smith (Herbie Hancock, Stanley Turrentine, Patti LaBelle, Clark Terry). Appearing on three tunes is cellist Suzanne Orban (National Symphony Orchestra, Mid-Atlantic Chamber Orchestra, Opus Tango Ensemble) and on two pieces is saxophonist Rob Holmes (a recording artist who also has played with Ken Navarro, Johnny Mathis, Jon Faddis, Christian McBride). John Emrich (sound designer and developer of electronic percussion instruments for major companies) plays percussion and drums.


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Reviews


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Mark S. Tucker, Folk and Acoustic Music Exchange

Eclectic Eve
I'm somewhat noted for a fairly edgy disdain for a good deal more than half of what calls itself New Age music, as my personal baseline lies in progressive rock, fusion, and the various anteceding genres which birthed it; therefore, I demand either the grace or the intelligence that came before everything in any succeeding twists and turns. Mostly, what I receive is milkily tepid semi-sophistications on an aqueous version of Chopsticks…but every so often a guy like Christopher Lapina comes along and puts things right. Eclectic Eve is precisely the sort of evolution the New Age movement mostly didn't take, and the disc makes up for a hell of a lot of outside efforts that I have no doubt make this very intelligent player and composer wince and horripilate as much as me.

From the very start, Highland Return discloses myriad depths and processes, never settling for an easy twist of stave or measure. The cut overall is a lush and luxuriant flow of Edenic pastorale soon followed by the more desertine Hand in Glove, a killer duet of percussion (John Emrich) and prepared piano (Lapina), something indexing beautifully with the all too slim catalogue of such efforts (Wolff & Hennings, Alain Kremski, classical and Balinesian works, etc.) before giving way to the jazzy mellifluity of Rolling Blue, a cut Donald Fagen would pawn his eyeteeth for. Though Lapina has backed superstars like Martha Reeves and B.J. Thomas, he studied under the superlative Harold Budd, and that influence is rivetingly clear, at times approaching Budd's divine The Pavilion of Dreams.

The sessioneers here are all top-flight players, have sat with a diversity of estimables (Chris Hinze, Boston Pops, Jon Faddis, Herbie Hancock, and a grab-bagful of others), and Suzanne Orban's cello is particularly rich and sensuous, a tableau of discerning aesthetics. Throughout, Lapina provides no end of rich or just lustrously spare, depending on the song's requirements, accompaniment and frontline craftsmanship, every note well-chosen, each line of melody and counterpoint exactly right. This is a CD of very high art, a catalogue of intelligent classical hedonism and many-layered riches gotten only through painstakingly considered values and various qualities that can't even be named. The old Windham Hill label would've been extraordinarily pleased had it been able to accompany some of Will Ackerman's remarkable releases with a disc like this. Thus, in short, Eclectic Eve is a collection of true Apollonian beauty.
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Raj Manoharan (www.rajmanreviews.blogspot.com)

The RajMan Review
For his new album, keyboardist Christopher Lapina has imagined a woman’s life journey for which he has provided the soundtrack. And like a true motion picture score, the music ranges through a variety of cinematic moods, from high drama to subtle emotion to inner reflection. One track is even composed solely of percussion, as an actual soundtrack might include.

Even without the story, the music stands on its own. Although Lapina serves as the primary composer and plays piano and synthesizer, he lays the foundation for rather than dominates the proceedings. As a result, the other musicians get a chance to shine, giving the impression of a full instrumental band instead of a solo act with accompaniment.

Reflecting the character progression in Lapina’s story, the music also embodies various styles and genres, including jazz, new age, and fusion. Standout tracks include “Highland Return,” “My Darling Esmerelda,” and my personal favorite, “Lucy Turns Eclectic,” which is sort of an all-out jazz doo-wop, for lack of a better term. I’d love to hear a whole album just in the style of “Lucy Turns Eclectic.”

Whether you want to hear an interesting soundtrack to an interesting story or just want to listen to some fine contemporary jazz-new age instrumental fusion, this CD fits the bill perfectly.
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Gena

TOP MUSICIANS JOIN CHRISTOPHER LAPINA ON ECLECTIC EVE
On the CD ECLECTIC EVE by Christopher Lapina, the artist plays piano, synthesizer, chimes, percussion and “prepared piano” (where the piano is played like a percussive instrument). In addition, Lapina is joined by a variety of accomplished musicians with impressive credits.

These include Phil McCusker on hollow-body electric guitar (Bruce Hornsby, Chris Botti, Diana Ross, George Duke), bassist Dallas Smith (Herbie Hancock, Stanley Turrentine, Patti LaBelle, Clark Terry), and Ron Baggerman on the BO-EL seven-string guitar (he is a recording artist based in The Netherlands who has played with Chris Hinze and Kai Kurosawa).

Appearing on three tunes is cellist Suzanne Orban (National Symphony Orchestra, Mid-Atlantic Chamber Orchestra, Opus Tango Ensemble) and on two pieces is saxophonist Rob Holmes (a recording artist who also has played with Ken Navarro, Johnny Mathis, Jon Faddis, Christian McBride).

Together these musicians create a broad array of instrumental sounds and styles -- light jazz, complex ensemble pieces, solos and duets, lovely new agey compositions, some tasty moments of cello and saxophone scattered throughout, and even vocalists on one tune singing wordless sounds.

Enjoy the eclecticism and top-notch musicianship on this album, and tell a friend about this incredible music.
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