Daria Rabotkina | Beethoven 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120 Schubert Moments Musicaux, D. 780

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Beethoven 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120 Schubert Moments Musicaux, D. 780

by Daria Rabotkina

Pianist Daria Rabotkina, called “…a pianist full of fire and warmth” (The Plain-Dealer), presents an album of music written by two composers at the end of their lives: Beethoven's 33 Variations on a Waltz by Anton Diabelli and Schubert's Moments Musicaux.
Genre: Classical: Piano solo
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Tema Vivace
0:51 $0.99
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2. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 1 Alla Marcia Maestoso
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3. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 2 Poco Allegro
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4. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 3 L'istesso Tempo
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5. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 4 Un Poco Più Vivace
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6. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 5 Allegro Vivace
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7. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 6 Allegro Ma Non Troppo E Serioso
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8. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 7 Un Poco Più Allegro
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9. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 8 Poco Vivace
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10. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 9 Allegro Pesante E Risoluto
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11. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 10 Presto
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12. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 11 Allegretto
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13. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 12 Un Poco Più Moto
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14. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 13 Vivace
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15. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 14 Grave E Maestoso
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16. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 15 Presto Scherzando
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17. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 16 Allegro
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18. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 17
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19. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 18 Poco Moderato
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20. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 19 Presto
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21. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 20 Andante
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22. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 21 Allegro Con Brio -- Meno Allegro
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23. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 22 Allegro Molto (Alla "Notte E Giorno Faticar" Di Mozart)
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24. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 23 Allegro Assai
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25. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 24 Fughetta. Andante
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26. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 25 Allegro
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27. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 26
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28. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 27 Vivace
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29. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 28 Allegro
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30. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 29 Adagio Ma Non Troppo
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31. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 30 Andante, Sempre Cantabile
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32. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 31 Largo, Molto Espressivo
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33. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 32 Fuga. Allegro
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34. 33 Variations On a Waltz By Anton Diabelli, Op. 120: Var. 33 Tempo Di Menuetto, Moderato (Ma Non Tirarsi Dietro)
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35. Moments Musicaux, D. 780: I. Moderato in C Major
4:48 $0.99
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36. Moments Musicaux, D. 780: II. Andantino in a-Flat Major
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37. Moments Musicaux, D. 780: III. Allegro Moderato in F Minor
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38. Moments Musicaux, D. 780: IV. Moderato in C-Sharp Minor
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39. Moments Musicaux, D. 780: V. Allegro Vivace in F Minor
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40. Moments Musicaux, D. 780: VI. Allegretto in a-Flat Major
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Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Ludwig van Beethoven (b. Bonn, Germany, 1770; d. Vienna, Austria, 1827) is a powerhouse composer who combined previous influences in a potent, explosive mix of talent and daring, and whose inspiring magnetism vitalized and determined the future of music. During his life, Beethoven experienced severe hardship that stemmed from his excruciatingly gradual loss of hearing. In 1802, he even wrote the so-called Heiligenstadt Testament in which he accepted his fate and acknowledged that only the music he believed he had still to compose saved him from ending his own life. The condition of his deafness steadily worsened until it became absolute in 1818 – nearly twenty years of auditory decline.

The 33 Variations on a Waltz by Anton Diabelli, Op. 120 were written in 1819 and in 1823. Beethoven received an offer to write a set of variations from publisher Anton Diabelli in 1819, shortly after Beethoven’s deafness became absolute. Diabelli asked many composers to each contribute a variation to his own theme. The project was a fundraiser for the victims of the Napoleonic wars, and 50 composers participated in the project, including Carl Czerny, Franz Schubert and the 11-year old Franz Liszt. Beethoven initially refused Diabelli’s proposal, allegedly calling the theme a Schusterfleck, or cobbler’s patch. By the end of 1819, though, he had composed twenty-three of the variations, and others were sketched for future work which Beethoven would resume a few years later. Diabelli published this gigantic set of 33 variations as a separate work in 1823.

There are several theories about the number of variations. One of them suggests that J.S. Bach’s Goldberg Variations were the model, which Beethoven surpassed in quantity by three variations. Another theory claims that he aimed to exceed his own 32 Variations in c minor. And last, there is the idea that Beethoven’s 32 piano sonatas were followed by the 33 Diabelli Variations, not only by a number, but in spirit, too. The final Arietta movement of the last piano sonata, Op.111 (composed during the intervening years of 1821-22) is also a theme with variations, and begins with the same descending interval of a fourth as the Diabelli waltz. The otherworldly serenity of the Arietta relates to some of the Diabelli variations, for example, 20, 24 and 33, and some of the Arietta’s rebellious, sharply rhythmical moments find kinship in Diabelli’s nos. 16, 17, 19 and 27.

The theme is multilayered, contrary to common perception. It presents a subtle contradiction between a light-minded character constantly tweeting its melodic turns and a stubborn character stomping out its chords. The variations that follow this theme inherit this appealing duality, which Beethoven transforms into myriads of different moods and characters. Variations 1 through 10 grow through a gradual increase in tempo, pausing at the “resting platforms” of nos. 6 and 9; some variations come in couples and emerge from one another, like nos. 11 and 12, 16 and 17; some live in one big family, like the last five pieces.

The magnitude of contrasts that Beethoven achieves in this work is immense: this range shows in the peaks of wildest frenzy in the final fugue, the solemn wisdom of variations 14 and 20, the transcendental vibrations of the soul in the last variation and a multitude of gradations in between.

Franz Peter Schubert (b. Vienna, Austria, 1797; d. Vienna, 1828) grew up in a family of music lovers and began music lessons at the age of five; at seven, he began studying voice with Antonio Salieri; at eight, violin, and later, counterpoint and organ. By the age of sixteen (and in spite of Salieri’s efforts to inspire him with Italian operas), he was already enthralled with the sounds of German operas, particularly Mozart’s Die Zauberflote and Gluck’s Iphigénie en Tauride. His early works are in the traditions of the Viennese School. Even though Schubert composed several operas, during his lifetime he was best known for his songs, and today he is also revered for his extraordinary chamber, symphonic and piano works.

Schubert wrote his Moments Musicaux, D.780, between the years of 1823 and 1827, around the same time that he was diagnosed with the disease that ended his life. During this final stretch of his life, Schubert created such dark, tragic works as the String Quartet No. 14 in d minor, D. 810 “Death and the Maiden” and the song-cycle Die Winterreise, D. 911. However, despite the misery and desperation caused by his failing health, the Moments Musicaux exude illuminated patience and contemplation.

The first piece, written in C Major, gently flows like a brook of peaceful moods, occasionally stopping to marvel in silence. As he does in all of the pieces in this set, Schubert moves in the middle to contrasting material but ultimately returns to the first idea. When the piece ends, listeners feel as though they have returned home. The second movement, in A-flat Major, alternates calm, tranquil waltzing and brief episodes of hopeless rigidity in f-sharp minor. In these first two pieces, Schubert not only uses triple meter (which creates an atmosphere of comfortable flow), but augments this effect by dividing each of the three beats in three, letting the music glide even more smoothly. Preciously concise and acutely mischievous, the third piece disappears faster than its lingering friendliness; its airy layer of sadness only hints at the depth of Schubert’s anguish. Its f minor tonality links it to the longer, more extroverted fifth moment. The two framing sections of the fourth piece bring to mind a ticking clock in the left hand and drifting snow flurries in the right. The melancholy outer sections embrace a timid, smiling-through-tears middle section. The fifth movement is a final attempt to rebel, with a marching anger that punctures its own decisiveness with persistent accents. Even if the quieter sections hint at fear, the piece ends on a note of determination and audacity. The last piece reconciles the unanswered questions in a serenity of acceptance and grace; this is the last “goodbye” of a tired and very kind heart.

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