David Ashworth | Days of Sun & Days of Rain

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
Bill Frisell Ralph Towner Richard Thompson

More Artists From
UK - England - North West

Other Genres You Will Love
Jazz: Contemporary Jazz Electronic: Experimental Moods: Featuring Guitar
Sell your music everywhere
There are no items in your wishlist.

Days of Sun & Days of Rain

by David Ashworth

A vibrant and eclectic collection of instrumentals from an original and innovative musician. The songs explore some of the legacies of contemporary jazz, ambient and experimental musics in a range of unusual fusions and cross connections.
Genre: Jazz: Contemporary Jazz
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Continue Shopping
available for download only
Share to Google +1

To listen to tracks you will need to update your browser to a recent version.

  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Giving Way to Fruitful Years
5:16 $0.99
clip
2. The First Time in a Long Time
6:45 $0.99
clip
3. An Endangered Species
7:07 $0.99
clip
4. Life's Little Ironies
5:47 $0.99
clip
5. Coming off Orton
5:16 $0.99
clip
6. A Week Out
6:40 $0.99
clip
7. Miserere Nobis
5:40 $0.99
clip
8. Blue
4:31 $0.99
clip
9. A Sketch
7:10 $0.99
clip
10. Late Snowfall
7:34 $0.99
clip
11. Days of Sun & Days of Rain
9:06 $0.99
clip
12. The Glory of the Moment
6:01 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
GIVING WAY TO FRUITFUL YEARS

This is one of several pieces here featuring online collaboration with Dave Scarth, a great bass player who I have had the pleasure of working with over many years.

The title comes from the lyric ‘We Used to Know’ by Jethro Tull, from the album Stand Up; the piece builds on a sequence of chords, drawing on the chords used in the original song.

This is my first recording featuring the use of an E-Bow, best described as a kind of hand held electronic bow for the guitar. It is the E-Bow which produces the long, sustained notes that you can hear in this piece.



THE FIRST TIME IN A LONG TIME

Another collaboration with Dave Scarth who provides an agile and sinewy bass line for this Miles Davis inspired piece. It was Dave who introduced me to Miles Davis’ In a Silent Way many years ago. This album, along with other recordings made around this time by Miles Davis and his contemporaries, continues to be a great source of musical inspiration and pleasure. This groove piece is based on the use of modes over a static harmony. The non- guitar parts are played on a guitar synthesiser.


AN ENDANGERED SPECIES

The foundation for this piece is the percussion part, a traditional African cross rhythm using simple repetitive patterns where there is some ambiguity between duple and triple metres. The other instruments exploit these patterns, sometimes playing in unison with a chosen percussion part and sometimes working against it.
The upper parts comprise a loosely formed duet for guitar and E-bow.


LIFE'S LITTLE IRONIES

A gentle piece built on a chord progression played on a fingerstyle guitar. The electric guitar melodies are doubled by synthesiser parts played by Dave Scarth, who also provides the bass line. The music has a drifting, almost aimless quality. The title comes from a collection of short stories by Thomas Hardy.


COMING OFF ORTON*

The piece begins with a meandering duet for mallet instruments, supported by long sweeping organ lines. Eventually a reflective guitar part joins the others. A further guitar part emerges playing repeated arpeggio patterns over a denser and darker background of keyboards. Orton Fell in Cumbria is a favourite afternoon walk, and the music attempts to describe the mood of descending from the fell at dusk, as ‘light drains off the fell like water’.



A WEEK OUT*

This piece is in two sections and describes how perceptions of time can change as a longed-for week’s holiday runs its course. With the first glass of wine, the days ahead reach away into the distance. Midweek, the tide turns, the last days come in with a rush which makes them harder to savour.


MISERERE NOBIS*

A misericord is a ledge attached to the underside of a hinged seat in a medieval church choir stall. This was to provide physical support for monks standing during long hours of prayer. Underneath this ledge you will often find intricate carvings made by master craftsmen. Because these carvings are hidden from view, the carvers were usually free to carve what they pleased. These scenes would often be of a secular or pagan nature, entirely at odds with the more visible and respectable Christian iconography which surrounds and rises above them. Miserere Nobis explores this dichotomy.


BLUE*

This piece explores the concept of blueness in some of its many different forms: things that are blue, indigo, sapphire and lavender, a bolt out of the blue, a blue moon, singing the blues …

It features a rare performance of what I refer to as ‘anarchy guitar’, an approach I use here to try to capture an impossible tune. The fingers are given free rein to thrash out something wild, which can then be tidied and pruned after the heat of the moment has passed.


A SKETCH*

If you visit the Wordsworth Museum in Grasmere, you will find a pencil sketch by the artist Constable, depicting a day of turbulent weather in the Lakes. The artist uses a range of drawing techniques to capture this scene: flurries of short strokes for slanting rain, cross hatching, scribbling to evoke the weight of wet earth and smudges to describe the clouds which build and dissolve. The music attempts to describe the elements of this drawing and the powerful scene to which it refers.


LATE SNOWFALL*

This tone poem describes a harsh and sombre scene, sheep with new-born lambs struggling to survive on a fellside in the north of England.


DAYS OF SUN AND DAYS OF RAIN

This title piece is a duet for two guitars. After an opening statement from the first guitar, the second one joins in with a counter melody. These two melodic lines twist and weave with what sometimes seems like complete freedom and independence. Occasionally they come together for moments of empathy and understanding. The music is a recollection of walking on the fells of the Buttermere Valley. In his guide to the walks of this area, Alfred Wainwright writes:

“I wish you all many happy days on the fells in the years ahead. There will be fair winds and foul, days of sun and days of rain. But enjoy them all.”



THE GLORY OF THE MOMENT

The Glory of the Moment grew out of a single melody, which appears as the second guitar solo in this piece. Chords were derived from the notes of this melody and assigned to an electric piano part. The interludes between the guitar refrains allow another opportunity for Dave Scarth‘s remarkably lyrical and inventive bass playing.

* these pieces are a musical response to poems by Mary Ashworth

Read more...

Reviews


to write a review