David Ezra Okonsar | Franz Liszt: Années De Pèlerinage, Vol. 3: Troisième Année, S.163

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Franz Liszt: Années De Pèlerinage, Vol. 3: Troisième Année, S.163

by David Ezra Okonsar

Franz Liszt: Années de Pèlerinage (complete) VOL.3: Troisième Année S.163, complete
Genre: Classical: Romantic Era
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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Années de Pèlerinage, Troisième Année, S.163: I. Angélus!
10:54 $1.99
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2. Années de Pèlerinage, Troisième Année, S.163: II. Aux cyprès de la Villa d'Este. Thrénodie I
8:51 $1.99
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3. Années de Pèlerinage, Troisième Année, S.163: III. Aux cyprès de la Villa d'Este. Thrénodie II
12:26 $1.99
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4. Années de Pèlerinage, Troisième Année, S.163: VI. Les jeux d'eaux à la Villa d'Este
8:38 $1.99
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5. Années de Pèlerinage, Troisième Année, S.163: V. Sunt lacrymae rerum
7:38 $1.99
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6. Années de Pèlerinage, Troisième Année, S.163: VI. Marche funèbre
6:45 $1.99
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7. Années de Pèlerinage, Troisième Année, S.163: VII. Sursum corda
3:46 $1.99
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Album Notes
Troisième Année S.163 (Third Year)

Angélus! (Andante pietoso)

Composed in 1877, it is dedicated to the gran-daughter of Liszt: Daniela von Bülow, it was first written for string quartet. A religious and somewhat naive composition of great charm with an alluring rendition of Angelus bells.

Aux cyprès de la Villa d'Este I: Thrénodie (Andante - Più agitato - Tempo I)
Aux cyprès de la Villa d'Este II: Thrénodie (Andante non troppo lento - Un poco animato - Tempo I - Un poco animato - Tempo I - Più lento)

A threnody is a lament or elegy composed or performed as a memorial to a dead person. Both pieces, from 1877, are nostalgic regrets depicting the gigantic cypress of the Villa d'Este in Tivoli where Liszt stayed several times, from 1864, thanks to the generosity of his friend the Cardinal Hohenlohe.

It seems that the second threnody was inspired by the cypress of the church Santa Maria degli Angeli, said to be planted by Michelangelo himself.

The threnodies, tragic and dramatic pieces, feature a deep and elaborated harmonic craft, highly chromatic with many whole-tone passages as well.

Les jeux d'eaux à la Villa d'Este (Allegretto - Un poco più moderato - Un poco accelerando - Un poco più lento)

Best known piece of the series, everyone is aware how this marvelous impressionistic work prefigured the Jeux d'Eaux of Maurice Ravel (1901).

The many cascades, water jets, littles caverns are all in it but most importantly this is not an alluring scherzo but again a deep meditative piece which leads to a section with an Evangelic (from St. John Passion) inscription: "ad vitam aeternam": "but whoever drinks the water I give them will never thirst. Indeed, the water I give them will become in them a spring of water welling up to eternal life.”
John 4:14 New International Version (NIV)

Sunt lacrymae rerum (Lento assai - Più lento - Un poco più mosso )

This piece was first named Hungarian threnody. Liszt was referring to the loss of the Hungarian liberation war of 1848-49. This tragic event also appears in the background of "Funérailles" ("Harmonies poétiques et religieuses").

Composed in 1872 and dedicated to Hans von Bülow, Sunt lacrymae rerum is a quotation by Virgil (Publius Vergilius Maro) (70–19 BC).

"Sunt lacrymae rerum" literally "tears of things" derives from Book I, line 462 of the Aeneid: a Latin epic poem, written by Virgil between 29 and 19 BC, that tells the legendary story of Aeneas, a Trojan who traveled to Italy.

In this passage, Aeneas gazes at a mural found in a Carthaginian temple dedicated to Juno that depicts battles of the Trojan War and the deaths of his friends and countrymen. Aeneas is moved to tears and says "sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt" ("There are tears for things and mortal things touch the mind.")

The piece is built on the Hungarian scale featuring two augmented seconds combined with a slow marching rhythm.

Marche funèbre (Andante maestoso)

This funeral march is composed to the memory of Maximilien I, Emperor of Mexico, killed in the revolution of 1867.

The epigraph of the score reads: " in magnis et voluisse sat est.": in great endeavors even to have had the will is enough.

This is from an Elegy of Sextus Propertius (50 BC – 16 BC) a Roman elegiac poet in Gaius Cilnius Maecenas' circle who was an ally, friend and political advisor to Octavian who was to become the first Emperor of Rome as Caesar Augustus. Octavian was an important patron for the new generation of poets, including both Horace and Virgil.

Sursum corda (Andante maestoso, non troppo lento)

In the beginning of the Catholic mass Sursum Corda (Latin: "Lift up your hearts" or literally, "Hearts up!") is the opening dialogue to the Preface of the anaphora (also known as the "Eucharistic Prayer"), in the Christian liturgy. It dates back at least to the 3rd century.

The priest-congregation dialogue is recorded in the earliest liturgies of the Christian Church, and is found in all ancient rites.

This "call" is the inspiration for this last piece of the cycle. It was composed in 1877 in Tivoli. Austere all over, it makes heavy use of the whole-tones scale. It appears like an endless uplifting call to everyone's hearts.

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