David Hyams | Travelling Bones

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Travelling Bones

by David Hyams

A departure from the Celtic inspired fusion of Hyams’ instrumental albums, this finds him in singer-songwriter mode, featuring rich instrumentation and with the songs stylistically rooted in contemporary folk and country, with some bluesy tinges,
Genre: Folk: Singer/Songwriter
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Shine On
3:06 $0.99
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2. In This Summer
3:07 $0.99
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3. A Roadside Lament
3:59 $0.99
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4. Home for the Weekend
4:09 $0.99
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5. One Day Gone
4:06 $0.99
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6. Love Stays
3:34 $0.99
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7. Travelling Bones
4:26 $0.99
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8. Shifting Sands
3:59 $0.99
9. Bittersweet
4:39 $0.99
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10. On and On
5:07 $0.99
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11. Another Day
3:41 $0.99
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12. You Are the Song
4:09 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
“Travelling Bones” is the third release from Fremantle based songwriter, instrumentalist and world traveller David Hyams.

The album marks a departure from the Celtic inspired fusion of Hyams’ instrumental albums and performances with the Miles To Go band. It’s stylistically much more rooted in contemporary folk and country, with bluesy tinges and not a bagpipe in sight! Themes of constant motion and the strong connection to the West Australian landscape remain, with stories which include an encounter with an emu on a desolate stretch of north west highway (Roadside Lament), celebration of a Kimberley night (Shine On) and the ritual pilgrimage to favorite southern coastal areas (In this Summer).

This is the first airing of Hyams’ voice on a record and has been several years in the making. Describing himself as a ‘blocked songwriter’ for many years, over which time he produced numerous instrumental pieces but no finished songs of his own, a revival of lyric writing came during his work with inmates of WA jails. Over a 5 year period, he facilitated the writing of and recorded 55 songs in various jails, culminating in the “Songs from the Inside” album.

The prison experience was profound and also inspired 2 of the album’s songs “Another Day” (the difficulty of re-adjusting to society) and “One Day Gone” (written for a female inmate who was struggling to overcome a tragic accident).

The work is an ongoing part of Hyams’ life and in 2013 took him Roebourne prison in WA’s northwest, as producer of an album involving the jail’s inmates, as well as the wider Roebourne community. On the project he collaborated with prominent Australian artists Lucky Oceans, Shellie Morris, Emma Donovan and Bill Chambers.

Travelling Bones was produced by Hyams and primarily recorded at Soundbaker studios in Perth with engineer Rob Agostini. It was mixed & mastered by veteran Perth sound guru James Hewgill (also recently working with John Butler). Hyams sings and plays guitars, mandolin, dobro and bouzouki and the album features the stellar talents of Roy Martinez (bass) and Angus Diggs (drums), classy Melbourne based string players and compelling performers in their own right, Melanie Robinson (cello, vocals) and Jenny M. Thomas (fiddle, vocals).

The songs have been quick to gain recognition with nominations for various song contests, including The WA Music Industry Association, (WAM) Song of the Year, ASA (Australian Songwriters Awards) and Tamworth Songwriters Association.

“Travelling Bones” is the recent release from Fremantle based songwriter, instrumentalist and world traveller David Hyams, released in 2013.

The album marks a departure from the Celtic inspired fusion of Hyams’ instrumental albums and performances with the Miles To Go band. It’s stylistically much more rooted in contemporary folk and country, with bluesy tinges and not a bagpipe in sight! Themes of constant motion and the strong connection to the West Australian landscape remain, with stories which include an encounter with an emu on a desolate stretch of north west highway (Roadside Lament), celebration of a Kimberley night (Shine On) and the ritual pilgrimage to favorite southern coastal areas (In this Summer).

This is the first airing of Hyams’ voice on a record and has been several years in the making. Describing himself as a ‘blocked songwriter’ for many years, over which time he produced numerous instrumental pieces but no finished songs of his own, a revival of lyric writing came during his work with inmates of WA jails. Over a 5 year period, he facilitated the writing of and recorded 55 songs in various jails, culminating in the “Songs from the Inside” album.

The prison experience was profound and also inspired 2 of the album’s songs “Another Day” (the difficulty of re-adjusting to society) and “One Day Gone” (written for a female inmate who was struggling to overcome a tragic accident).

The work is an ongoing part of Hyams’ life and in 2013 took him Roebourne prison in WA’s northwest, as producer of an album involving the jail’s inmates, as well as the wider Roebourne community. On the project he collaborated with prominent Australian artists Lucky Oceans, Shellie Morris, Emma Donovan and Bill Chambers.

Travelling Bones was produced by Hyams and primarily recorded at Soundbaker studios in Perth with engineer Rob Agostini. It was mixed & mastered by veteran Perth sound guru James Hewgill (also recently working with John Butler). Hyams sings and plays guitars, mandolin, dobro and bouzouki and the album features the stellar talents of Roy Martinez (bass) and Angus Diggs (drums), classy Melbourne based string players and compelling performers in their own right, Melanie Robinson (cello, vocals) and Jenny M. Thomas (fiddle, vocals).

The songs have been quick to gain recognition with nominations for various song contests, including The WA Music Industry Association, (WAM) Song of the Year and Tamworth Songwriters Association.

MANAGEMENT

Miles To Go Music
0419 040 700
info@milestogo.com.au



MEDIA

Dixie Battersby
dixie2266@internode.on.net
0413 382 201



Emma Bradstock ISOLATED NATION Review -

If you're looking for some new music and you're sick of the mundane- you need to check out Fremantle based songwriter David Hyams, on his brand new album 'Travelling Bones'. I first met David three years ago at Fairbridge Festival and his music has absolutely captivated me ever since. 'Travelling Bones' is a beautiful contemporary folk and country album with a hint of blues that fills a small part in your soul that you wouldn't otherwise have even known was empty. It's also the first time the warm and unique voice of Hyams has been captured on an album. It's filled with obvious strong ties to the Australian outback and landscape and I think that adds a really personal feeling to a very strong album. 'Travelling Bones' features lots of instrumentation which makes for some unique sounding tracks and really gives this album its main feel and vibe. David plays the guitar, mandolin, dobro, bouzouki and also sings, he's accompanied by Roy Martinez on bass, and Angus Diggs on drums. If you've seen David live before, you'll also recognise the string players; Melanie Robinson on the cello and vocals and Jenny M Thomas on the fiddle and vocals. It's also worth mentioning that 'Travelling Bones' was recorded by Rob Agostini at Soundbaker Studios in Perth, and mastered by James Hewgill- favoured by many accomplished musicians- most recently John Butler.

The opening track of 'Travelling Bones' is 'Shine On'. It's a brilliant opening track and one of my favourites on the album. 'Shine On' is a celebration of the Kimberly and how beautiful it is at night and David does this using beautiful melodies and harmonies that stay with you long after the song has finished. Touches of strings in the right places and the beautiful vocal layering really enhance the feel of this song and I really enjoyed how well balanced this song is. Nothing is over or under done- its just constant and even through the song. If a section needs more- it's there. Some sections don't need that much- and they're right too. Just a really good example of great songwriting.

'In This Summer' is a happy upbeat guitar driven track which has some really great vocals harmonies. It really tells a story and makes you feel like you're in an Australian summer. It's got a really great feel to it and I love the way it just feels like Australia-in-a-song without being cheesy. This song was a tribute to David's favourite coastal areas and you can really feel that. So great.

'A Roadside Lament' is a song I've heard live quite a bit but on record it's not what I expected at all. It's about a time David hit an emu while out on the road. The first minute is mostly atmospheric, angsty sounding instruments just going crazy and really giving you the raw, edgy vibe that Hyams must have felt in the moment and I love the track so much more now. The crazy sounds make for a really cool track and this is another of my favourites, purely because it was a familiar one and I just love all the changes. It really makes the song much more impressive.

Following that raw scary track we have 'Home for the Weekend' which is upbeat and once again we can hear Hyams' love for the Aussie outback in his lyrics. What I find really great about this track is the contrast between the warm vocals of Melanie and Jenny backing up David and then heating his voice by itself, it's a great juxtaposition of sounds and I think that's really effective in this particular track.

David has done a lot of rehabilitative work with inmates in Western Australia and he says a lot of that actually helped him write lyrics for his songs. 'One Day' is a song written for a female inmate who was struggling to overcome tragedy and the lyrics are super haunting and really stick with you after you're finished listening to the track. I love the way the guitar flows in this track and the dobro sound works really well with it. Really beautiful to listen to. I liked this track a lot.

'Love Stays' is interesting in the way we have a pretty upbeat happy song with fairly negative lyrics in the verses, which then turns around to be positive again in the chorus. I love the fiddle part which matches up with David's vocal track in some to make up the hook melody. They blend together better than they should! I think the mix should get a little credit in this section. The drum track in this song is also really good. I enjoyed the way it sounded and it in with the track.

'Travelling Bones' is next and I always feel like tracks that have the whole album named after them really have a lot to live up to but this song certainly does that. It's a lyrical journey and the main melody of this track is really one of those ones that gets stuck in your head. The vocals on this track are really exceptional too. Melanie, Jenny and David were honestly made to sing together. It's a prefect blend of voices and it really comes together to form that main hook. When are you gunna rest those travelling bones David?

'Shifting Sands' is another one driven by the dobro. Man- I do love that sound. David has this way of making stringed instruments just sing. He's fit it in around the vocals perfectly and this song is really where the dobro shines in its own element, when we get to hear what it can do! And yes, there's another cheeky 'Travelling Bones' reference in there! ;)

'Bittersweet' is our next track and we are now getting to the pointy end of the album. The opening instrumentation feels on edge and the vocals mirror this feeling. The whole song has a more bitter than sweet feeling and just feels really sad. The fiddle gets a chance to star in this song though, as well as the upper range of David's vocals.

I remember David telling the story of 'On and On' which is basically all about being on the road and touring. The cello is beautiful on this track really gives it a chance to come into its own. Different people from the road make small lyrical cameos in this story David has written into song.

The penultimate track on 'Travelling Bones' is 'Another Day' which again draws on David's experience with inmates. This track is about readjusting to life on the outside when you've been in prison for a long time. The lyrics really draw you in and make you feel the emotion that you're supposed to feel. The tune and the message stuck with me all day. There's a few different awesome progressions and licks that all come together to create a really cool sounding song- more so as the song goes on. It's sort of got to be heard to explain. What other excuse do you need to get a hold of the album!?

'You Are the Song' finishes the album on a high. It again features all of the vocalists in perfect harmony and the mandolin really adds the extra pop into the track. For such a tiny instrument it sounds absolutely brilliant. It's the absolute perfect track to end on. I love the break down halfway through the song- it's short but sweet and is exactly what the song needs. Perfect ending track!

I remember asking David about an album a year or so ago and it feels like I've waited forever. Honestly it was worth the wait. I've been listening to this album all day and there's no tracks I don't like or am sick of. It's a really strong effort.

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