Dennis Warren's Full Metal Revolutionary Jazz Ensemble | Quest

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United States - Mass. - Boston

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Jazz: Acid Jazz Hip-Hop/Rap: Latin Rap Moods: Type: Improvisational
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Quest

by Dennis Warren's Full Metal Revolutionary Jazz Ensemble

A mixture of everything ancestral, human and spiritual....each sound, riff, instrument seemed to have something to say, a language, message, about the experience of being alive and together. I heard merengue and gaga, Hendrix and New Orleans.
Genre: Jazz: Acid Jazz
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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Prelude
8:56 $0.99
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2. Crack Like Thunder
14:22 $0.99
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3. Explosions
7:00 $0.99
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4. Implosions
5:30 $0.99
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5. Here Comes the Thunder
6:06 $0.99
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6. Dominican Nights
6:04 $0.99
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7. Ritmo Dance
8:29 $0.99
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8. Interlude
11:00 $0.99
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9. Sweet Ritmo
10:39 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
*Quest*, the latest CD from Full Metal Revolutionary Jazz Ensemble, is an amalgamation of language and sound. A mix of live concert recordings from the Lily Pad in Cambridge MA, on September 20, and studio sessions that occurred in November/December 2014 with trumpeter Forbes Graham playing the muted and computer processed trumpet and multi-instrumentalist Hilary Noble on tenor saxophone, flute and didgeridoo. The result is a cultural and musical brew that expresses the fundamental rhythms of human life as it moves through the external and internal, expands and breathes, on the way to something infinite. Building on the influence of jazz poetry, rap lyricism and the vivacious roots of African American and Caribbean music, the music pulsates with the spontaneous melodic phrasing of its instruments.

The polyrhythms and percussive pulse of FMRJE are powered by the all-time drum improv of Dennis and his brother David, on bass. The rhythmic inspirations are from Puerto Rican American percussionists, Jose Arroyo and Carl Parks and the spoken word, spit in both Spanish and English, was laid down by Dominican American rapper EPluribus. Adding to the acid funk grooves is the relentless playing of eclectic guitarist Ted Demmons, while Michael Shea brings the influences of Don Pullen and Eddie Palmieri to the the mix.

Dennis began his improv music education in 1970 at Antioch College’s Institute for the Solution of Social Problems in Ohio, where the Black Music Department was directed by virtuoso avant-garde pianist, Cecil Taylor and drummer, Andrew Cyrille. Dennis graduated from Bennington College in 1984. He studied music under the distinguished trumpeter/composer, Bill Dixon and the awe-inspiring percussionist, Milford Graves. Graves said of Dennis, “He plays drums coming from the soul.”

Dennis started Full Metal Revolutionary Jazz Ensemble in his hometown of Boston in 1989. Since then, the band has lost some its great talent, multi-reedist, Raqib Hassan; trumpeter, Roy Campbell; trumpeter and composer, Raphe Malik; and tenor saxophone giant, Glenn Spearman, have passed on but their spirit is still alive in the music they helped create.

This CD, Quest, by FMRJE 9.0, is the essence of synergy. Its uniting improv dimensions signify the universal search of completeness through all the moving parts that make us collectively and musically, human. The 9 tracks represent movement in the 79-minute concert that can be played in any order and blend together fluidly. Quest is an odyssey that will be felt as much as it is heard.

A mixture of everything black and ancestral, human and spiritual....each sound, riff, instrument seemed to have something to say, a language, message, about the experience of being alive and black and together. I heard merengue and gaga,
Hendrix and New Orleans, tribal heartbeats and children playing in the barrio. In short, it was real dope!

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