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Doctor Obvious | World Dominance for Beginners

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United States - Colorado

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Electronic: Virtual Orchestra Classical: Modernist Moods: Type: Soundtrack
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World Dominance for Beginners

by Doctor Obvious

Ruling the world is easy and dystopia never sounded so good. Travel in the space between the rational and the emotional, the electronic and the symphonic, the normal and the unexpected.
Genre: Electronic: Virtual Orchestra
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Cultivate a Following
3:21 $0.99
clip
2. Prove You Are Human
4:09 $0.99
clip
3. Prevant Any Escape
3:47 $0.99
clip
4. Trust No One
2:02 $0.99
clip
5. The Silent Belle (Bicycle Built for One)
3:19 $0.99
clip
6. Daisy Bell (Warped Waltz Mix)
2:33 $0.69
clip
7. She=mc^2 (Elevator Mix)
1:33 $0.69
clip
8. Daisy Bell (Bicycle Built for Two)
1:34 $0.69
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
The official soundtrack for the play "World Dominance for Beginners". Sure, there's a secret society that rules the world, but it's not that malevolent. But it is a bad place for an office romance.

The theme of the album revolves around "Daisy Bell" (better known as "Bicycle Built for Two"). It has a long history including being the first song sung by computer synthesis and sang by the computer Hal in the movie "2001: A Space Odyssey". The theme makes appearances in most of the songs as they deal with the relationship between the computers and humanity, the analytical and the emotional. With a touch of dystopia thrown in for good measure. Orchestras square off with arpeggios and there is something distinctly human in the tension.

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