Donna Greenberg | Baris Standith

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CANADA - Ontario

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Classical: Medieval Classical: Early Music Moods: A Cappella
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Baris Standith

by Donna Greenberg

A haunting two-part a cappella piece in a medievalesque style set to a Gothic-language text.
Genre: Classical: Medieval
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
1. Baris Standith
3:28 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
“Baris Standiþ” (‘The Barley Stands’) is a haunting two-part a cappella song in a medievalesque style set to a Gothic-language text, composed by the Canadian composer and writer Edmund Fairfax and performed by Donna Greenberg. A choir-effect was created for this recording by superimposing multiple tracks of her singing both parts. This is the first of a number of musical pieces that will make up the projected CD album _Music from The Dwarf’s Head_, i.e., realizations of “ancient” music that will appear in Edmund Fairfax’s literary novel _The Dwarf’s Head_ (in progress), which centers on the life of the fourth-century Gothic king Ermanaric. In the novel, the song was composed to help the king overcome worry and sleeplessness—a kind of lullaby for the overstressed, if you will—when things begin to fall apart. The lyrics are:

Baris Standiþ bairht uf sunnon;
Augona meina audags luka,
Miduhwagja mik maurginis winda.
Ufarmunno nu, unmundonds nu.

The barley stands bright under the sun;
My own eyes I the blessed one do shut,
And I wave along in the morning’s wind.
I forget now, I the unmarking one now.

More particulars can be found on Edmund Fairfax's website.

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