Elizabeth Geyer | The Bridge

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AUSTRALIA - New South Wales

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Pop: Folky Pop Jazz: Jazz Vocals Moods: Solo Female Artist
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The Bridge

by Elizabeth Geyer

Singer Songwriter with jazz sensibilities and lyrical storytelling
Genre: Pop: Folky Pop
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. The Bridge
4:00 $0.99
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2. Waterfalls and Rainbows
3:52 $0.99
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3. Goodnight Romeo
2:36 $0.99
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4. Home
3:12 $0.99
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5. Perfect Life
2:30 $0.99
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6. Rain Falls
3:34 $0.99
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7. The Party
3:21 $0.99
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8. The Jewel
2:47 $0.99
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9. I Weep
3:39 $0.99
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10. Postcards from Paradise
3:48 $0.99
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11. The Wall
3:12 $0.99
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12. Place to Fly
3:32 $0.99
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13. Rose
2:08 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
"She's a force of nature. Amazing singer and songwriter, original vocalist, wonderful trumpet player and multi instrumentalist. She writes songs that come directly from the heart.”
— BRUCE LUNDVALL, BLUE NOTE Records/ EMI

In making music, I have tried to stay out of my own way, write only the song that is asking to be written, and when recording, ask only what is the song asking for. We know deep down when a thing is right.

I waited seven years to record THE BRIDGE - another one of those things that had to be 'right'! I have my talented friend Paul Adams to thank for making this album possible. The Bridge has been a long journey, a whole series of leaps of faith, starting with me getting on a plane in Australia for Peoria, Illinois in Winter, 2013. I can't wait to share these 13 new songs with you.'

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Reviews


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Lynn Pendlebury

A Box of Delights
Yesterday evening I listened to Elizabeth Geyer's incredible album "The Bridge" for the very first time. She really has excelled herself here and is flying ..... When her album plays it is as though the listener and the artist are the closest of friends, sitting chatting over a cup of coffee or tea and the lyrics of the songs are her opening up her heart about her life. Elizabeth's music has never been predictable. Her musical expression is parallel to what you would expect of intonation in speech and she is unique in her patterning and so very real and fresh as a result. I adore her profound, quirky and so insightful remarks about life, her self-evaluation and assessment of others, but never in a derogatory way where the general public is concerned. Her love shines through all the possible cynicism and feelings of regret. This latest offering is packaged superbly (I always buy the physical copy), with illuminating notes and lyrics and wonderful pictures. I always think of Elizabeth's music as story-telling at its best. Well done lady! I love this album and look forward to listening to it again and again and working through all the layers it offers. This talented musician/songwriter is so very gifted, unassuming, original and authentic. Wow! It is brilliant the way that others have collaborated with her and raised her artistry to new heights. I am so very pleased that I discovered this wonderful being and her music all those years ago. This new album surpasses all she has achieved before, I believe. It really is like a treasure chest.
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Mark Smith

Bridging Worlds of the Heart
Like a gifted shaman who courageously ventures into another world and compassionately, gently brings back valuable gifts for a soul into this world, so to does Elizabeth Geyer bridge between a world of soul stirringly honest emotion and the world of concrete. "Material things, or the brilliant swirls of color in secret dreams?"

Being such a beautifully personal and poetic collection of songs, The Bridge feels to me like what a tone poem really is - colorful, meaningful, and full of imagery. And I love how she skillfully goes from the personal to the grand - "Rain falls and suddenly we're all the same." Or, "Fair weather friends and false alarms can turn a heart hard to everything and everyone but God himself is in these drums!"

Thus is the wonderful value in this album that sets emotions masterfully in lyric and music. The Bridge does not disappoint in making what was secret no longer secret. In her poetic words "The bridge that neither side could see" is indeed a reality and "was here all along."

We are lucky to have woven for us here a new dream of the heart that sits comfortably alongside a familiar old dream of the heart that is forever young.
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Mark Smith

Bridging Worlds of the Heart
Like a gifted shaman who courageously ventures into another world and compassionately, gently brings back valuable gifts for a soul into this world, so to does Elizabeth Geyer bridge between a world of soul stirringly honest emotion and the world of concrete. "Material things, or the brilliant swirls of color in secret dreams?"

Being such a beautifully personal and poetic collection of songs, The Bridge feels to me like what a tone poem really is - colorful, meaningful, and full of imagery. And I love how she skillfully goes from the personal to the grand - "Rain falls and suddenly we're all the same." Or, "Fair weather friends and false alarms can turn a heart hard to everything and everyone but God himself is in these drums!"

Thus is the wonderful value in this album that sets emotions masterfully in lyric and music. The Bridge does not disappoint in making what was secret no longer secret. In her poetic words "The bridge that neither side could see" is indeed a reality and "was here all along."

We are lucky to have woven for us here a new dream of the heart that sits comfortably alongside a familiar old dream of the heart that is forever young.
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Scott Peterkin

A Breakthrough Album
The Bridge, the forth album by Elizabeth Geyer, succeeds in using music and words to evoke comparison with successful broadway music. After listening, you will hum the songs and think you have experienced an evening of stories of people you might know. As familiar as the music feels it is most certainly unique and the product of one person. With the exception of one cover song this album is the sole creation of Elizabeth Geyer (co-produced and performed by Paul Adams). Is it a one woman musical, a light jazz concept album or an exceptionally fine collection of songs? The truth is, the album with strong melodies, instrumentals and poetic lyrics is a rare gift for listeners who will believe it to be all three.

The album's curtain opens with the title song in which the sound of a fog horn fades to silent followed by a piano playing a lone drum beat. Geyer isn't so much starting a song as she is setting the stage for her work. The lyrics are indirect and disguise the song's meaning - the conflicts inherent when holding to artistic values. Of the compromises needed to win fame she warns "Tomorrow's drummer never sees them come." The musical signature of this song and the ones that follow is provided by the unlikely blend of Elizabeth's own Flugelhorn playing, piano and vocals. The phrasing, more Sondheim than traditional Popular Song, indicate a composer determined to leave routine verses behind and write words and music that go together no matter where they may end up.

In "Rain Falls" the universal experience of watching rain is almost more musical catharsis than song. "Suddenly we're all the same. No amount of money can stop the rain we drop the guns that we were holding and watch the rain." The message may be familiar but the images offered to reflect that meaning are unique. "Last night's petty thieves are spread out on the train sleeping like babies" followed by "When it rains a boy and his granddad are the same age both glued to the window with their cupcakes." The melody uses syncopation as the unexpected pounding of rainfall. A flugelhorn solo suggests the ability of the human spirt to rise above the rain.

The human condition doesn't escape from these songs. For my money, "Perfect Life" is the album show stopper with a confessional lyric about the end of a romantic affair, "It never went away, the sadness in my heart I just hide it from the world and I'm crying in this cafe." Her passion is aflame in these lines... "I've got no more grace to spare please life your perfect life, just live it over there" and ends in a survivors triumph "....I've tried to be an angel, I wish I was an angel but I'm just a human being." After the song builds to this conclusion one can easily imagine am audience erupting into applause to mark their approval and drums pound to also signal a finality.

The Bridge is a breakthrough album which offers breathtaking musical views. The musicianship used to create the album defines Geyer as one of the few who understand how to paint emotion with song. With this work she have moved beyond songwriting and becomes a musician who can do it all, compose, arrange and perform.
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Roosevelt Roy, Jr.

It's not just an album--it is an adventure waiting for you to push play.
I have been a fan of Elizabeth Geyer's music since I first heard her 2008 junior effort 'On Patrol With The Jazz Police'. I was quite impressed with her ability to paint a very textured coloured canvas of sound, and combines this with her distinctive and unforgettably beautiful voice. I can honestly say that Elizabeth Geyer is a gem of a storyteller, she reminded me immediately of Joni Mitchell, a Canadian folk singer turned jazz musician that literally gave me perspective into avenues of music I had only dreamed of. In my opinion, Elizabeth shares the same gift: to bring you (the listener) into her inner sanctum of Her Heart.

About the same time I discovered 'On Patrol With The Jazz Police' I discovered Joan Cartwright, a veteran jazz and blues vocalist/composer/producer/author/educator and founder of Women in Jazz South Florida, Inc. exclusively to showcase & promote women musicians, globally. I was made aware that Diva Joan Cartwright had scheduled an online interview with Elizabeth Geyer. I am not one who believes in coincidences, everything happens for reasons known or unknown. I was fortunate enough to be the 2nd caller during the 'listener call in question' part of the interview. I asked Elizabeth of her musical influences and asked her about Joni Mitchell. She confirmed my intuition. I thank Diva Joan Cartwright to this day for sharing & broadcasting Elizabeth's thoughts with American listeners and lovers of jazz.

Elizabeth's 4th studio album, 'The Bridge' was released just a few months ago. After much listening and thinking, I have come to the conclusion that 'The Bridge' is in fact a concept album. I cannot confirm that this was Elizabeth's indeed intention, but I find such cohesion and have discovered several layers 'The Bridge' encompasses: a bridge is a link, a passageway and a connection. Elizabeth collaborated with veteran multi-instrumentalist musician/producer Paul Adams to create in my opinion, a very strong yet gentle statement with 'The Bridge'. I'll return to my discussion of the 'concept' later.

Each song on 'The Bridge' develops a personification that adds to the previous track. The album opener is the title track, and it is an arms wide open invitation. An anthem of sorts, "The Bridge" prepares the mind for the journey that ensues. "Waterfalls & Rainbows" follows, and like someone turning on a light switch--here we see Elizabeth's songwriting skills in full bloom. She creates here what can only be described as a 'waterfall' of soothing sound, how aptly named. A multi-instrumentalist herself, Elizabeth effortlessly plays piano, keyboards, horns & her lovely voice combined with subtle guitar & bass provided by co-producer Paul Adams equal something very special.

Let me describe if I can Elizabeth's sweet as an angel voice. Elizabeth has a powerfully dynamic voice, which can blow you off your feet as in "Home" or become the perfect accompaniment by being more introspective as in "Perfect Life". I know some may disagree, but Elizabeth's voice has the ability to jump right into your lap in ways that are fondly reminiscent of the way Paul McCartney's youthful voice does on The Beatle's 'Revolver' album. No kidding, remember what you felt when you first heard Paul sing "Good Day Sunshine"? The music is already beautiful, so how can it get better you think to yourself, then boom Elizabeth's voice suddenly animates each song to near perfection. Add to that the wonderful sitar-like guitar touches on "The Party", then you'll understand why I cannot write this review without mentioning The Beatles.

You will without a doubt after listening, understand why and how Elizabeth titles her songs. Succinct and to the point, she holds nothing back, opening her heart and mind for all to see and enjoy. Songwriters always impress me for the courage displayed when one delicately opens their hearts exposing their hopes, fears, dreams & tears for the world to see. Very brave when you think about it. That is why she immediately brought to mind the courage I first recognised in the music of Joni Mitchell. When you listen to Elizabeth you actually get to KNOW her. It is almost too wondrous to describe in words, but I try nevertheless.

'The Bridge' as I stated earlier in my opinion IS a concept album, at least to me. Elizabeth and co-producer Paul Adams have created an album that is in fact a bridge on several levels: each song builds upon the previous, weaving a tapestry of very emotional yet subtle musical treats. That is only the 1st level. Secondly Elizabeth 'bridges' on a literal global scale. You see, Elizabeth is an Australian native, and came to America purposefully to have this album recorded and produced by veteran musician/producer Paul Adams. I consider Paul a musicians' musician: He even makes his own instruments that he plays and has even custom made instruments for the likes of Daryl Hall (of Hall & Oates). So I see 'The Bridge' as not only a wonderful musical journey, Elizabeth Geyer literally bridges continents with this album.

The mixing and mastering of this album is impressively done by co-producer Paul Adams. Upon each listen I can close my eyes and feel as if I am in the studio while this was being recorded. The album's is very well arranged and truly allows each instrument, including Elizabeth's voice to have the space as well as the place to truly allow each song to expand to it's fullest form.

The album's closer "Rose" is another standout song masterfully combining Spanish style guitar with subtle vocal aria's drifting overhead. From the conch shell (courtesy David Hoffman) sounding the opening of the title track, followed by Elizabeth's intense yet restrained piano, then adding to that her purposefully styled vocals. Just WoW! It doesn't stop there: Elizabeth is extremely adept playing horns, namely the flugelhorn and all of the above is arranged and mixed so considerately; in other words this is an album made for the listener to enjoy. That is why I consider Elizabeth Geyer a true musician. With each song she invites the listener to Her Story, regardless of the subject matter. She also shows us her humanity, her love of life and her love for living, these ooze from each and every song on 'The Bridge'. If you are a lover of jazz or not, or if you are able to appreciate songwriting on a very personal scale, this is a MUST LISTEN album.
It's not just an album--it is an adventure waiting for you to push play. Thank you Elizabeth.
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Rick Reiley

The Bridge- One Fine Piece of Work!
Elizabeth Geyer's 'The Bridge'- One Fine Piece of Work

When I was 19 I had spent the previous years developing my musical tastes. Buddy Holly, Roy Orbison, Johnny Mathis, the Everly Brothers, Bob Dylan, the Byrds, the Bluethings, the Beatles, Joan Baez, Joni Mitchell, Peter, Paul and Mary and then one day I discovered Laura Nyro. This was like opening a fresh vein deep inside and connecting me to a force I had never realized could be. I had felt passion in the music, deep passion, but never as fully it until this experience.

47 years later comes Elizabeth Geyer's 'The Bridge', co-produced by Paul Adams. And I am instantly reminded that such things can still happen, at any age.

Through the years I developed a taste for a little jazz, old 40's standards, Sinatra, Billy Eckstine, Marilyn Maye, Duke Ellington and of course Cole Porter, the Gershwins and Johnny Mercer.
This journey paved the way for my fully embracing Ms. Geyer's work, from The Dream to On Patrol with the Jazz Police- ('Beautiful Spiders' what a treat!!!!)!

I can imagine Karen Carpenter and Laura Nyro sharing hot strong coffee in Chet Baker's living room with Elizabeth taking notes and chiming in to trade stories and riffs from time to time.
There is no crass commercialism here, nothing written in hopes of being the 'next big thing', nothing here that says, 'Look at me! I'm competing on American Idol'. But one thing stands out like a beacon; the fact that it this music springs from the same deep well of mercy and unmasked passion as all of those great talents I mentioned.

'The Bridge' plays out like a movie. No actors or cameras needed. It plays out in my head like a cascading waterfall of faces, desires, passions, regrets, lingering questions tinged with hope, among the baggage of the broken dreams.

This is the work of someone who has bared her passion and her soul with all the fervency of a wild canyon fire in a slow November rain. It sets the stage for new growth to come. Green and ever searching for deeper roots, a place to land.

I usually write about the loosely and broadly defined Oklahoma 'Red Dirt' music scene. And while Elizabeth Geyer comes from a different country (Australia) and a different jazz influenced genre and while The Bridge is in an even slightly different vein, the music comes from the same deep well-spring of goodness. It is simply fine, fine music with quiet, astute, observations that thread them all together in a divine tapestry of human desire. And sung in a lovely voice from a beautiful spirit who not only writes but performs luxuriously on the piano and flugelhorn.

I have to go listen again. Ms. Geyer and The Bridge are great inspirations.
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Russ Nester

The Miles Davis of Lyricists
Each time I hear The Bridge, it’s wonders unfold for me just a little more, and the layers – and continuities - of meanings become more clear. Certainly these songs are among Elizabeth Geyer's most cryptic lyrics, but also among the most rewarding for those who make the effort. Elizabeth is perhaps the Miles Davis of lyricists. What at first listen is a series of disconnected and sometimes incomplete thoughts is, actually, a complete stream of thought, with many unnecessary words left unspoken. Miles was the master of “use of space”, leaving listeners to wonder why he sometimes played so sparingly. While Miles was all about the music, Elizabeth is all about the human condition, with music as the medium - the vehicle - of her stories. Each song is a complete story, and the complete album a movie-in-your-head. Close your eyes and enjoy the movie.
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David Witherington

A Bridge Worth Crossing
The welcome return of the voice of a friend...that's how I felt after only one listen of "The Bridge." In the seven years since her last album, Elizabeth Geyer's songwriting has grown even richer in its ability to imprint lasting imagery in your mind. As I listened to the hilarious opening words of "The Wall" -"the second I saw the cracks, I ran around whacking the filler in" to the sober realization of "it's better to pull a wall down if it's only going to fall down" is just one example of the powerful emotions that stick with me already on this wonderful new record. In "The Party," I truly relate to the alien feeling of disconnect of the man with no plan for retirement, but Elizabeth beautifully shows us hope at the end of hopelessness with the words "Everybody's talking the language of dollars 'cause it's the only language they know...but just because a heart can't hear your words doesn't mean a heart can't sing your song." This is a message for the ages from a soul that shines like a jewel, which leads into a song by that name which will make any heart smile with its 'diamond in the rough' analogy. The thirteen lovely new songs here tie together nicely, running the gamut of emotions from broken dreams through lamented love and self-realization to an endless hope found in the irony of such lines as "funny how one's cage is another's place to fly." There is a beautiful spirituality in Elizabeth's writing, and she still astounds me with her ability to see God in places I would never think of, but I'm so grateful that she points them out to me... because then I can see Him too. This, of course, is on full display in the gorgeous "Waterfalls and Rainbows." Whether we have conflict in the material world or in our souls, Elizabeth Geyer reminds us that "the bridge that neither side could see was here, was here all along." Highly recommended...a masterpiece lyrically and musically. Thankyou, Elizabeth, for showing me a bridge worth crossing.
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Paul Adams

The Bridge
Although I was involved in making the album, I am still finding layers and depth upon each listen. David Witherington's review(above) is really spot on. Elizabeth is unable to do anything but expose that deepest part of her heart. Her level of artistry stands tall with anyone whether Jazz lover, Folk, Pop.... it is msic that is honest and pure
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