Elliot Schneider | Out in the Streets

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Out in the Streets

by Elliot Schneider

In the tradition of The Rolling Stones “Street Fighting Man” and The Beatles “Revolution,” “Out In The streets” makes you want to leap to your feet and sing against the widening disparity of wealth that plagues our nation. We can change the world!
Genre: Rock: 60's Rock
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1. Out in the Streets
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ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
At the writer Cary Tennis’ house, I was asked by David Talbot, the CEO of Salon.com to write a song for the Occupy Wall Street movement. This song is in the tradition of The Rolling Stones “Street Fighting Man” and The Beatles “Revolution.” It makes you want to leap to your feet and joyously get out in the streets and have your voice heard.


Out In The Streets

I can see that people are angry
When they’re told to tighten their belts
Then they holler ‘can’t afford a belt now’
What the hell’s been trickling down?
The rich get richer, you get poorer
You better mind your P’s and Q’s
The only thing that ever trickles
Down to you—is
Let’s get out in the streets
Let ‘em count our feet
Let’s get out in the streets
Not accept defeat

Wait on the queue, what trickles down
There are no jobs—house under water
You are secure as cannon fodder

The rich get richer, you get poorer
You better mind your P’s and Q’s
The only thing that ever trickles
Down to you—is
Let’s get out in the streets
Let ‘em count our feet
Let’s get out in the streets
Not accept defeat

I can see that people are hungry
Out on a limb, up on a tree
Down the creek, without a paddle
To the slaughter, just like cattle
The rich get richer, you get poorer
Better not vote against yourself
The only one that can help now
It’s up to you!

Let’s get out in the streets
Let ‘em count our feet
Let’s get out in the streets
Not accept defeat


Let’s not take it or they’ll just fake it
On Halloween you’re left holding the bag
All their stories and all their glories
Their movie queen is just a hag

The rich get richer, you get poorer
You better mind your P’s and Q’s
The only thing that ever trickles
Down to you—is

Let’s get out in the streets
Let ‘em count our feet
Let’s go out in the streets
Not accept defeat

By Elliot Schneider © 2011

The musicians playing on this song are:

Elliot Schneider: Lead Vocals, Guitar and Harmonica
Carmen Castro: Keyboards
Phil Sollar: Drums and Percussion
Mark Banning: Guitar
Rob Wullenjohn: Guitar
Tyler Jensen: Bass Guitar
Mark Newstetter: Background Vocals
Brad Barth, Recording Engineer

Once upon a time I was in Chicago visiting Fran Rinaldo, an amazing singer and drummer. Her father, Tommy Rinaldo, used to be Les Paul's drummer and Mr. Paul dropped over. (This was around when men first set foot on the moon.) He was touring at the time and he invited me to travel back to New York with him and Ten Years After. I wasn't able to do that so he gave me his card and invited me to his home in Mahwah, New Jersey. I played for him at his house (in March in 1970) and he wanted to produce my song, "The First day Of Summer." Being young and stupid, I never took advantage of that opportunity. I was just finishing my senior year in college and soon after visiting him, I took an LSD trip that lasted a month. Since that experience, you can be sure I never, ever dropped acid again. To paraphrase Woody Allen, "My brain--why that's practically my second favorite organ!"

In the summer of 1970 I was awarded the A. Jeffrey Weinper Award in Creative Writing for fiction. Then I spent the Seventies bouncing between New York, San Francisco, the Greek island of Corfu and the rest of Europe, too. I wrote songs, stories and articles and had lovely adventures...

On December 15, 1979 my band Elliot Schneider and the Pitts was the third band in history to debut at CGBG's on a Saturday night. (Patti Smith, the Talking Heads, Blondie and Television were some of their debut artists, as I recall.) In 1982, I left New York and moved to San Francisco, where I put out my first album. Chris Halaby, the brother of Queen Noor of Jordan, plays on some of these songs; in fact he's the guitarist on "Wise Men Never Say." (I wrote that song in a G tuning and I taught him to play it; the first time he did we ran the tape player and we captured it in one live take, vocals and guitar together. It was magic so we left it alone. It's probably my favorite live vocal I've ever recorded.) Chris and I were put together through a mutual connection with John Hammond, Sr. who discovered Billie Holiday, Benny Goodman, Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen.

In San Francisco I first played as Elliot Schneider and The Pitts and then formed Elliot Schneider and The Banned. Below is the infamous review of that very band.

In 1987, I gave up the holy grail of rock and roll. I retired, went to graduate school, became a high school history and philosophy teacher--and played in rock band with my students. We would play high school rallies in front of screaming appreciative pupils (who were hopefully without dilated pupils!) Then in 2005 I got breast cancer, beat it, retired from teaching and returned to rock and roll with a vengeance. I am determined to drop dead at ninety years of age on stage with a smile on my face. My beloved Carmen Castro will still be playing keyboards right next to me when I do and if there's an encore, I will rise up and sing one last time...



Salon.com’s renowned columnist Cary Tennis reviews Elliot Schneider


Review: Elliot Schneider & The Banned
V.I.S. Club - April 1986


Elliot Schneider’s gold lame shirt and spandex pants, his Jagger moves and Elvis Costello delivery, his frizzy hair and his Bob Dylan nose make it impossible to classify him, categorize him, deny, defy or crucify him. Everything about him invites skepticism; you know right off he’s either a total flake or a total genius.
His songwriting runs from the straight rocking of “Splendid- I’m Suspended,” about a rebellious high school troublemaker, to the spine-chillingly touching ballad “ Ready and Willing,” a declaration of explosive love that Costello would have been proud to write.
Schneider’s surrounded himself with players who take his direction with alertness and conviction; when he leaps they soar with him, and when he drops to his knees their playing follows him down. If he wasn’t so professional his acrobatics would seem foolish, dated and juvenile, but instead his flips, splits and windmills punctuate the music, and he uses them to conduct the Banned. It’s exciting to see not just a frontman, but a genuine bandleader in action.
I especially enjoyed it when Eric, The Banned’s teenage ace drummer, started soloing on “Satisfaction” and couldn’t stop; Eric’s got the power and madness of a Keith moon and a precision Moon would have paid money for. As the solo hammered on and on, Schneider eventually gave up trying to bring the band back into the song, instead choosing to stand in the shadows like a jazzman listening to one of his players reach new heights.
The true test of a great showman and a great band is how you feel after the show. I gave Schneider the ultimate test- I was fighting with my girlfriend when we walked in, and by the time the first song was over we were happy again. Schneider deserves to be widely heard and acknowledged.
Cary Tennis
Calendar Magazine, April 1986




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