Elouise & César Dávila-Irizarry | Transmigration

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Folk: Alternative Folk Electronic: Industrial Moods: Mood: Brooding
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Transmigration

by Elouise & César Dávila-Irizarry

Transmigration is a 5 song collaborative and continued deconstruction of historical American standards and original pieces created by the band Elouise and American Horror Story theme song composer César Dávila-Irizarry. An intersection of primitive Americ
Genre: Folk: Alternative Folk
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. I'll Fly Away (Remix) [feat. César Dávila-Irizarry]
Elouise
3:18 $0.99
clip
2. Oh Lord (Remix) [feat. César Dávila-Irizarry]
Elouise
2:30 $0.99
clip
3. Hurricane (Remix) [feat. César Dávila-Irizarry]
Elouise
3:06 $0.99
clip
4. Ring of Fire (feat. César Dávila-Irizarry)
Elouise
3:29 $0.99
clip
5. Eyes of Duque (feat. Elouise)
César Dávila-Irizarry
3:00 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Transmigration is a 5 song collaborative and continued deconstruction of historical American standards and original pieces created by the band Elouise and American Horror Story theme song composer César Dávila-Irizarry. An intersection of primitive American Folk, Industrial and Cinematic soundscapes. Sound weaving through the space and time continuum with apparitions of Americana standards and visitations of original songs haunted by ghosts in the machine. Trans•mi•gra•tion is the passage of a soul after death into another body.


César Dávila-Irizarry

Electronic rock composer, César Dávila-Irizarry, who most notably wrote the theme song for American Horror Story left
Puerto Rico when he was 23 years old to pursue studies in sound art and experimental music. With a decade of experience as sound designer for TV and film in Hollywood, he shifted his career and is focused on music composition. César has collaborated with Charlie Clouser of Nine Inch Nails and has won 5 BMI Awards for his work on American Horror Story.


Elouise 'Deep Water' debut album reviews~

“Elouise plays a primitive, angsty, menacing form of folk that uses vintage Appalachian string instruments and gear to squeeze the raw pain out of the psyche through song. - And yes, it’s as good as that makes it sound.”-COVER LAY DOWN

The boldness and the daring never lets up; from the compositions, to the instrumentation, to the vocal performances. It’s a kaleidoscopic trip through the American musical experience, with fragments and reflections of classics splitting with the most primitive of musical impulses. Every note of it is necessary and every rest in between the notes is full of profundity. “Art,” that taken for granted American birthright of so many generations past, gets a momentary resuscitation in the inspired hands of Elouise.-PARCBENCH LIVE

If you want to pigeonhole Elouise, as most music fans and writers need to do – Imagine if Tom Waits and Lucinda Williams had a baby and that baby was raised by Mother Maybelle Carter – then you’d have Elouise.-INNOCENT WORDS

“Deep Water is one of the most brilliant albums conceived and recorded in recent years. If you can’t open your ears to the concept and appreciate the time and effort it took to pull this off, that’s your problem. Truth be told, I can see this album being not only accepted but passionately embraced by a large percentage of Americana fans worldwide. Fans of any genre. Listen with headphones. In a dark room. With the volume turned up.”-NO DEPRESSION: THE JOURNAL OF ROOTS MUSIC

“It is the sound of sin and salvation mixed in a dark cocktail with a taste of Bluegrass, a black symphonic sound and weary emotional vocals that tell original tales of struggle and re-imagine songs from our collective Americana consciousness.”-AMERICANA DAILY

Elouise redefines what it means to be an Americana/Bluegrass band. it should be part of every serious music lover’s collection. It is gritty, provocative and real, and for that reason alone, we highly recommend it.-INDIE VOICE

“The album is something of an epic journey into a genre of music they identify as Blackgrass... If the vocals don’t get you, the surreal collection of instruments and the incredible songs most certainly will...It is an alternative work of art, file under excellent.”-BEEHIVE CANDY

“This incredible album takes deep dark old time hillbilly, gospel and blues (race music) to a depth of sinister unearthliness that has not been heard or even imagined for many decades and yet running counter to that it is also a recording of dark beauty. A case in point is album opener, I’ll fly away, a gospel song written originally the best part of a hundred years ago by Albert Brumley, although he probably wouldn’t have recognized this version but would undoubtedly have appreciated it.”-AMERICANA ROOTS UK

“If you’ve ever understood lyrics like ‘got Sunday meeting in the morning, gonna do my sinning tonight”, you’ve already got a leg up on this set. An utterly original set that you have to listen to at least twice...there hasn’t been a record with this kind of striking, damaged beauty in way too long. Killer stuff throughout...”-MIDWEST RECORD

“.... The music is dense and intense and downright orchestral at times (if demons play in orchestras). One of my favorites so far this year, the album is titled Deep Water.”-FRANK GUTCH JR.

“...not the kind of gal you’d bring home to mama. Elouise has the kind of voice that’s all jailhouse Mallory from “Natural Born Killers” with a distinct drawl and the creakiness of an old porch rocking chair. Backed with banjo, guitars, cello, fiddle, and sometimes drums, harmonium, horns, double bass, accordion, bandoneon and marxophone, this band plays morose into magnificent. It’s the kind of outfit you’d expect to be from New Orleans (Nawlins), Baton Rouge, the Mississippi Delta, or somewhere just outside of Mobile, Alabama, but certainly not LA.”-CHAIN D.L.A. / STEVE MECCA



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