Faux Frenchmen | Oblivion

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Faux Frenchmen

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Jazz: Gypsy Jazz Jazz: Modern Creative Jazz Moods: Mood: Fun
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Oblivion

by Faux Frenchmen

gypsy jazz string quartet
Genre: Jazz: Gypsy Jazz
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Edna's Knot
5:35 $0.99
clip
2. It Don't Mean a Thing
5:23 $0.99
clip
3. The Opposite of a Nurse
4:07 $0.99
clip
4. Chromatic Drag
5:13 $0.99
clip
5. Allee Royale
5:36 $0.99
clip
6. I Saw Stars
4:46 $0.99
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7. Little Baby Beck
4:06 $0.99
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8. Seigneur Terrasse
4:39 $0.99
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9. Eleventh Floor Stomp
3:27 $0.99
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10. Harry Lime Theme
2:25 $0.99
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11. Oblivion
4:32 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
A mere eleven months after the release of their first eponymous CD, the Faux Frenchmen release their second disc, “Oblivion,” which highlights the band’s compositional talents.

The Frenchmen are bassist Don Aren, guitarists George Cunningham and Brian Lovely, and violinist Paul Patterson. Seven of “Oblivion’s” eleven titles are original compositions, and all band members contribute pieces to the project. Compositions are based on, but not chained to the style pioneered by Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grappelli with the Hot Club of France during the 1930’s in and around Paris.

The Brian Lovely-produced disc features elements of gypsy jazz (Lovely’s “Little Baby Beck”), ‘30’s American and Euro-tinged jazz (Patterson’s “Chromatic Drag” and “Allée Royale,” Aren’s “Edna’s Knot”), and Raymond Scott-fueled cartoon music (Cunningham/ Patterson’s “The Opposite of a Nurse.”). Also featured are Argentinean tango composer Astor Piazzolla’s title cut and timeless jazz staples by Duke Ellington and others.

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