Felipe Pérez | Texas en Polka

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United States - Texas

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Latin: Conjunto Latin: Tejano Moods: Mood: Upbeat
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Texas en Polka

by Felipe Pérez

When Felipe Pérez plays his accordion everyone notices that he looks every bit as happy as his music sounds. Full of life, Felipe plays la música alegre with speed and a tireless verve. It’s no wonder. Felipe has been playing professionally since 1950 and
Genre: Latin: Conjunto
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Texas en Polka
2:35 album only
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2. Tabita
1:46 album only
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3. Los Tres Felipes
2:10 album only
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4. El Galopito
1:58 album only
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5. Sulamita
3:02 album only
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6. El la Jalapeña
2:34 album only
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7. Mis Recuerdos
2:23 album only
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8. El Chupa y Sopla
2:34 album only
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9. Alicia
2:21 album only
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10. El Grillito
2:17 album only
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11. Al Zaz y Zaz
2:42 album only
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12. El Gorgoreo
1:58 album only
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13. La Teclita
2:20 album only
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14. Bailando en los Curros
2:23 album only
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15. La Mosquita Muerta
2:14 album only
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16. El Ciringue
2:26 album only
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17. El Zerruchito
2:17 album only
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18. Llorando en el Cementerio
2:13 album only
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19. Robstown Polka
2:03 album only
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20. Media Noche
3:46 album only
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21. Del Terrenazo
1:28 album only
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22. Olga
0:45 album only
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23. Sobre las Olas
3:06 album only
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Felipe was born on October 15, 1940 in Corpus Christi, Texas. His father was born Felipe Negrete. He was, Felipe says with a grin, a “bandito from Mexico” and a relative of the great singer and actor, Jorge Negrete. Fleeing some troubles south of the border, Felipe Sr. changed his last name to Pérez after arriving in Texas. There was a lot of music in Felipe’s family. His uncle Luis Cardona first inspired him to play music. Luis would sit with an accordion, cigar, and a bottle of beer and play music each night. Felipe recalls, “I wanted to play because of him.” He first learned to play harmonica, and soon mastered accordion, bajo sexto, drums, and bass.
Felipe was drawn to music and grew up within earshot of Agnes Street in Corpus Christi, where the cantinas, filled with conjunto musicians, lined both sides of the street. He also went to local platform dances and VFW shows, where he saw players like Manuel Guerrero. Tough as Agnes Street was, Felipe began hanging around these cantinas as a little kid, shining shoes for money, absorbing all the music he could, and hunting down the legendary players of the era, such as the great Juan Lopez.
An accordion master known as “El Rey de la Redova” (“the King of the Redova”), Juan Lopez was Felipe’s principal musical influence. Lopez was a big man who worked the fields during the day and then played at night and on the weekend, always with a case of beer next to him. Felipe learned a great deal from Lopez’s inexhaustible musical knowledge, absorbing both his repertoire and his fast, lively style of playing. “I don’t want to brag and use his name, but he brought me up,” Felipe says plainly. Today Felipe’s playing is about as close to Juan Lopez as you will ever be lucky enough to hear, even as it is unquestionably his own.

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