Various Artists | Fractures

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Electronic: Experimental Folk: Acid Folk Moods: Type: Compilations
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Fractures

by Various Artists

A study of a time of schism which travels from gently splintering electronica to exploratory folkloric tales via interwoven, reinterpreted echoes of synthesized experimentation from back when.
Genre: Electronic: Experimental
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. The Osmic Projector / Vapors of Valtorr
Circle Temple
5:36 $0.75
clip
2. The Land of Green Ginger
Sproatly Smith
6:32 $0.75
clip
3. Seeing the Invisible
Keith Seatman
3:18 $0.75
clip
4. Triangular Shift
Listening Center
3:48 $0.75
clip
5. An Unearthly Decade
The British Space Group
2:29 $0.75
clip
6. A Fracture in the Forest (feat. Alaska & Michael Begg)
The Hare And The Moon
6:50 $0.75
clip
7. Elastic Refraction
Time Attendant
8:53 $0.75
clip
8. Ratio (Sequence)
The Rowan Amber Mill
3:59 $0.75
clip
9. The Perfect Place for an Accident
Polypores
8:32 $0.75
clip
10. A Candle for Christmas / 311219733
A Year in the Country
4:45 $0.75
clip
11. Eldfell
David Colohan
6:19 $0.75
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Fractures is a gathering of studies and explorations that take as their starting point the year 1973; a time when there appeared to be a schism in the fabric of things, a period of political, social, economic and industrial turmoil, when 1960s utopian ideals seemed to corrupt and turn inwards.

As a reaction to such, this was a possible high water mark of the experimentations of psych/acid folk, expressions of eldritch undertones in the land via what has become known in part as folk horror and an accompanying yearning to return to an imagined pastoral idyll.

Looking back, culture, television broadcasts and film from this time often seem imbued with a strange, otherly grittyness; to capture a sense of dissolution in relation to what was to become post-industrial Western culture and ways of living.

Such transmissions and signals viewed now can seem to belong to a time far removed and distant from our own; the past not just as a foreign country but almost as a parallel universe that is difficult to imagine as once being our own lands and world.

Fractures is a reflection on reverberations from those disquieted times, travelling from gently splintering electronica to exploratory folkloric tales via interwoven, reinterpreted echoes of synthesized experimentation from back when.

It takes as its initial reference points a selected number of conspicuous junctures and signifiers: Delia Derbyshire leaving The BBC/The Radiophonic Workshop, deliberating later that around then “the world went out of time with itself”. Electricity blackouts in the UK and the three day week declared. The Wickerman released. The Changes recorded but remained unreleased. The Unofficial Countryside published. The Spirit Of Dark And Lonely Water released.

Featuring contributions by:
Circle/Temple (The Straw Bear Band/The Owl Service), Sproatly Smith, Keith Seatman, Polypores, The British Space Group, The Hare And The Moon, Time Attendant, A Year In The Country, The Rowan Amber Mill (The Book Of The Lost), David Colohan (United Bible Studies) and Listening Center.

Released as part of the A Year In The Country project, a set of year long journeys through and searching for an expression of an underlying unsettledness to the English bucolic countryside dream; an exploration of an otherly pastoralism, a wandering amongst subculture that draws from the undergrowth of the land, the patterns beneath the plough, pylons and amongst the edgelands.

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