Order 3 or more CDs and get 1¢ domestic shipping through 03/31/2020.
Frank Colón | Latin Lounge

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
Afterlife St. Germain Thievery Corporation

More Artists From
Brazil

Other Genres You Will Love
Latin: Latin Jazz New Age: Contemporary Instrumental Moods: Type: Instrumental
There are no items in your wishlist.

Latin Lounge

by Frank Colón

A modern blend of Latin grooves and romantic melodies, to move your body, touch your heart, and soothe your soul. My music raises consciousness, brings people together, and promotes peace.
Genre: Latin: Latin Jazz
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Continue Shopping
cd in stock order now
Buy 2 or more of this title's physical copies and get 10% off
Share to Google +1

To listen to tracks you will need to update your browser to a recent version.

  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Emerald Coast
4:26 $0.99
clip
2. Easy Does It
3:30 $0.99
clip
3. Summer Cocktail
3:42 $0.99
clip
4. Let's Just Go...
4:06 $0.99
clip
5. Samba Gitano
3:25 $0.99
clip
6. Spanish Heart
4:57 $0.99
clip
7. Bali
7:56 $0.99
clip
8. Wishful Thinking
5:33 $0.99
clip
9. Tango Lucumí
4:00 $0.99
clip
10. The Whales of Bahia
5:27 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
All songs composed and arranged by Frank Colón.

SONGS:
Easy Does It
(2) Emerald Coast
(3) Summer Cocktail
(4) Let’s Just Go…(You and Me!)
(5) Bali
(6) Wishful Thinking
(7) The Whales of Gibraltar
(8) Samba Gitano
(9) Tango Lucumí
(10) Spanish Heart

Musicians: (In alphabetical order...)
- José Arimateia: Trumpet
- Raphael Batista: Violin
- Julio Falavigna: Drums
- Daniel Figueiredo: Additional Synths
- Jamie Glaser: Acoustic Guitar
- Estevão Lima: Bass
- Jr. Lobbo: Electric Guitar
- Luana Mallet: Vocals
- Carlos Malta: Flute, Bass Flute
- Kleyton Martins: Keyboards
- Roman Miroshnichenko: Flamenco,
Electric & Acoustic Guitar
- Elton Ricardo: Fender Rhodes
- Christiano Rocha: Drums
- José Staneck: Harmonica
- Mateus Starling: Electric Guitar
- Mateus Viano: Accordion
- Cristiano Veneza: Violin, Viola, Cello
- Frank Colón: Percussion, Drums,
Vocals & Programming



Emerald Coast

- Estevão Lima: Bass
- Jr. Lobbo: Electric Guitar
- Carlos Malta: Flute, Bass Flute
- Kleyton Martins: Keyboards
- Cristiano Rocha: Drums
- Cristiano Violi: Violin, Viola, Cello
- Frank Colón: Percussion, Programming

The inspiration for this song surged when I moved out of my apartment in the city, Rio de Janeiro, and began living full-time at what had, until then, been my summer beach get-away. It’s a lovely, spacious two-story house which was designed and built in the ancient Indian Vastu Architectural style.

I’m in a region of Brazil that’s referred to as “the Green Coast” (litoral “Costa Verde”), where the reflections from the mountains running close to the coastline influence the color of the ocean, making it looks very green on a bright day. To me, depending on the way the sun’s beams twinkle on the gentle waves, it reminds me of emeralds shining in the sun.



(2) Easy Does It

- José Arimateia: Trumpet, Flugelhorn
- Daniel Figueiredo: Additional Synths
- Estevão Lima: Bass
- Kleyton Martins: Keyboards
- Cristiano Rocha: Drums
- Frank Colón: Percussion, Programming

“Easy Does It” is an expression in the English language which is most often interpreted as meaning that “something that one is trying to accomplish will be better achieved through finesse, as opposed to via brute force.”

So, after going through about 30 different songs that I had sketches for, my best friend, Daniel, and I chose nine songs for this new CD. And, I was actually cool with that… until Daniel looked at me and said, “Bro, you’ve got to write another song that complements this album’s Latin lounge thing! We’ve got to make it a CD with 10 songs!” So, I got back home and went to my studio and racked my brains trying to “create” another tune for this list!

Well… three or four days into this and nothing seemed to come to mind….. and, suddenly, when I’m just stroking the keyboard, trying out sounds… the intro all of a sudden came through. From there, I channeled the bass line and began constructing the other parts, letting them come in on their own. The melody was the last one to show up.



(3) Summer Cocktail

- Daniel Figueiredo: Additional Synths
- Estevão Lima: Bass
- Jr. Lobbo: Electric Guitar
- Carlos Malta: Flautas
- Kleyton Martins: Keyboards
- Cristiano Rocha: Drums
- José Staneck: Harmonica
- Frank Colón: Percussion, Programming

This song literally began more like a jingle, as I had basically written a quick groove to use as background for a video idea. But, while I eventually scrapped the video concept, I really felt the groove insistently in my gut! It always got me rockin’ in my desk chair…you know?! So I went back to it and re-worked my original quick-jingle-beat into more of a voyage, while I waited…. and, then, my friend, drummer Julio Falavigna, turned me on to Bianca Gismonti’s fine CDs,,,, and it was there that I first heard and felt José Staneck’s harmonica. As soon as I heard that sound, I knew this song had been getting ready for José to grace it with his magic.



(4) Let’s Just Go…You and Me!

- José Arimateia: Trumpet
- Estevão Lima: Bass
- Luana Mallet: Vocals
- Kleyton Martins: Keyboards
- Cristiano Rocha: Drums
- Frank Colón: Percussion, Programming

Once again, I learned from this song that an artist, at times, must be flexible while conducing the process of their creation to its completion. While Wayne Shorter affirms that “No song of mine is ever finished…they’re ALL works in progress!” (…and, maybe he’s right?!), I strive hard to keep my grooves real tight, both in the studio as well as performing “live”!

But, I digress… I originally wrote this as a piece for a harp soloist. And my original tracks had a symphony harp as the lead voice. But, as I went along, the song kept getting more boudoir-like, more reminiscent of a Latino film noir seduction dance scene than the celestial tones of the harp.

So, I scratched the “harp idea” and decided to bring in a young and fresh Carioca trumpet player - José Arimateia - instead. I'd called him so he’d record a couple of other songs, but his tone and his vibe uplifted the session, so I had him take a pass at “Let’s Just Go…”, and he took it to where I wanted it to go. Singer, Luana Mallet, stopped by the studio, heard what we were doing and got into it,,, so I had her cut the vocal track that my partner, Daniel, and I had been “hearing” for about a week.



(5) Samba Gitano

- José Arimateia: Trumpet
- Raphael Batista: Violin
- Julio Falavigna: Drums
- Estevão Lima: Bass
- Kleyton Martins: Keyboards
- Elton Ricardo: Fender Rhodes
- Cristiano Rocha: Drums
- Frank Colón: Percussion, Programming

This song began as a riff on my Zendrum, which I had programed to play bass notes. I would then play that through a repeater until it was sounding smooth, and then capture a loop. While the bass loop played, I would switch the Zendrum’s sound-bank to a drums and percussion set. I grooved on this for a while until an idea for a melody started to beam in, at which point, I programed the individual tracks into Logic and built the rest of the orchestration from that
foundation. At this point, I still didn’t have a name for this song.

It was during the recording of the keyboards, with Kleyton Martins, that the idea of giving this a gypsy / eastern-European twist in tone and instrumentation by bringing in a “gypsy violin”. The concept and the title beamed in simultaneously - “Samba Gitano” translates to “Gypsy Samba”.

Before recording it, when I mentioned the concept, most everyone looked at me quizzically….. but, I believe it worked! What do you think?

And, what do you think of this young violinist, Raphael Batista? Slammin’, soulful cat, don’t you think?

(6) Spanish Heart

- José Arimateia: Trumpet
- Roman Miroshnichenko: Acoustic Guitar
- Luana Mallet: Vocals
- Kleyton Martins: Keyboards
- Cristiano Rocha: Drums
- Frank Colón: Percussion, Bass Sequencing

This is one of songs that one has to simple be grateful for, because I have no idea where it came from.

It was one of those moments where one is totally relaxed, with one’s hands running lightly over an instrument, and not thinking about anything. One isn’t expecting anything…. we’re just….open and relaxed.

The bass line was the first to show up, in parts. I heard it in my head complete before I could actually play it at the speed that i was hearing it… something that I never really got. Thank Apple for Logic! It really took me a while to get it “correct and relaxed”! And, in the end, I’ve got my Bro, Daniel, to thank for helping find the best upright bass sound for the track.

“Spanish Heart” features the beautiful Flamenco guitar of my friend (…and one of Russia’s premier musician/composers) Roman Miroshnichenko. When I tell my friends that the guitarist on this song is from Moscow, everybody says, “What?!”.

Much like a Flamenco singer, Luana Mallet uses her voice like an instrument, while letting her heart coax her vocal timing. She was actually not familiar with the Reguetón groove that kicks in at part “B”, so she listened to the groove a few times…..we dimmed the studio lights….and then she did these vocalizations. We didn’t need but one take.



(7) Bali

- José Arimateia: Trumpet
- Estevão Lima: Bass
- Roman Miroshnichenko: Flamenco, Guitar, Electric Guitar
- Carlos Malta: Flute
- Kleyton Martins: Piano, Keyboards
- Cristiano Rocha: Drums
- Frank Colón: Percussion, Programming

As the name states, I composed “Bali” as soon as I got back from spending a week at a health and relaxation spa, in a town called Ubud, in the mountains of Bali. Margo and I walked a lot around downtown Ubud, in the evenings and there were always concerts of local music. I saw live Gamelan orchestras every night! But, it was the bamboo marimbas that some cats would play around the hotel that left their impression on me…

So this song originally began as a melodic riff played on a bamboo marimba. Next came the bass lines and, oddly enough, the rhythm instruments were the last ones to be added.

It’s the most “open” of the songs, lending itself to jazzistic improvisations and “call and response” kind of improvs, while the rhythm section keeps cooking.


(8) Wishful Thinking

- José Arimateia: Trumpet
- Jamie Glaser: Acoustic Guitar
- Estevão Lima: Bass
- Kleyton Martins: Keyboards
- Cristiano Rocha: Drums
- Frank Colón: Percussion, Programming

This song has a groove that doesn’t quit! That’s mostly because of Kleyton Martin’s piano and Cristiano Rocha’s drums.

When Cristiano came in to the recording, he took it to another level. A higher level!

At this point, at Daniel’s suggestion, I had Estevão Lima track the bass,,,, and he enhanced it even more! It’s brilliant!

I then sent the song to guitarist, Jamie Glaser, in Provo, Utah, with sheet music to perform, and he did a great job!

Returning to Rio, the track was ready for Arimateia. In the studio, José and myself took the original sitar tracks that I composed for part “B” and separated the Hindu chords into notes for his trumpets. My idea of part “B” is to evoke
“interdimentional time travel”…… what do you think?


(9) Tango Lucumí

- José Arimateia: Trumpet
- Julio Falavigna: Drums
- Daniel Figueiredo: Additional Synths
- Estevão Lima: Bass
- Kleyton Martins: Keyboards
- Cristiano Rocha: Drums
- Mateus Viano: Accordion
- Frank Colón: Percussion, Programming

Here, again, I’m combining cultures in the music as well as in the title. You see, as this song showed up in my consciousness, it just felt more African to me than it did, Argentinian. So, when I began working around at home with it, I actually tested some Cuban Batá drums in this groove. And, you know? It would have worked… sort of.

But, while I took out the religious drums, I maintained the Yoruba feeling in the percussion playing-style, as well as in the tuning. This, I feel, still propels the essence of this song.

Julio Falavigna’s drumming is another propulsion factor, as he gentlemanly assumes command of the rhythmic engine. And, as a Brazilian from the south and well versed in Gaucho customs, folklore and music, he was the perfect choice for “Tango Lucumí”!

As we were mixing Julio’s drum tracks at Daniel’s studio, I mentioned that it was a crying shame that I didn’t know any readily-available Bandoneón players! As soon as the studio engineer (…and guitarist!), Junior Lobbo, heard me, he said that he knew “this badass accordionist, that lives real close to me… 40 minutes away!” So, we called him immediately,,, he came over in 45 minutes ,,, listened to the song a couple of times… and laid down this track on his second take!



(10) The Whales of Bahia

- José Arimateia: Trumpet
- Elton Foster: Fender Rhodes
- Estevão Lima: Bass
- Kleyton Martins: Keyboards
- Cristiano Rocha: Drums
- Mateus Starling: Electric Guitar
- Frank Colón: Percussion, Programming


“The Whales…” What can I say about “The Whales of Bahia”? First of all, they were first from “Taormina”. Then, they were from “Gibraltar”! Finally, they have migrated to “Bahia” permanently.

But, let me tell you, this tune began on my Handsonic. Really. I’m not kidding!
It began with me playing a firm tumbao on the big pads, while the smaller trigger pads that circle the top were programed with some ambient sounds that I sampled from my vintage Wave Drum. After a few days of practicing this concept, I recorded a long pass on the Handsonic and exported it to a Flash Drive.

Inserted into Logic, I then re-did all the drumming and effects individually into the program. And, at this point (Wouldn’t you know it?!), a bass line that had been hovering around my head finally landed, and the song began to gain more structure. Then came Elton Foster, with his Fender Rhodes, and put some mellow, classic tones…and he song gained much more body.

Curiously, the idea of adding some Berimbau didn’t occur to me until the definitive personality of the piano line was ascertained by Kleyton. We tried some different approaches until we went with this one. And, then, it seemed like the song was asking for some Berimbau! In my first demos, it was quite prominent and in your face! Now, it’s there… subtly enhancing the harmonic richness that’s complimented by Mateus Starling’s soulful guitar!

And, as for Estevão Lima using his bass to trade sounds and riffs with a whale? Well… that’s got to be a first!!!


Read more...

Reviews


to write a review