Cary Fridley | Down South

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Down South

by Cary Fridley

Her signature country voice evokes centuries of southern country voices from Memphis Minnie to Maybelle Carter, combining the honesty of folk music with the bluesy Americana groove of the Asheville, NC.
Genre: Country: Old-Timey
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. When the Levee Breaks
3:14 $0.99
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2. Pretty Saro
4:16 $0.99
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3. Lonesome Homesick Blues
2:51 $0.99
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4. Shucking the Brush - 7 Mile Ford
2:33 $0.99
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5. North Country
3:04 $0.99
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6. Going Down South
2:17 $0.99
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7. You Led Me To the Wrong
4:06 $0.99
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8. Come All You Fair and Tender Ladies
2:56 $0.99
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9. Cheatin'
3:12 $0.99
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10. God Don't Like It
4:28 $0.99
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11. I Have No Mother Now
3:42 $0.99
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12. Making Believe
3:48 $0.99
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13. Dolly - 7 Mile Ford
2:18 $0.99
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14. Scotland Man
3:46 $0.99
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15. Wild Bill Jones - 7 Mile Ford
3:15 $0.99
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16. Barlowe Knife - 7 Mile Ford
7:15 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Down South is an apt title for Cary Fridley’s second solo CD release, as her singing evokes centuries of Southern voices from Memphis Minnie to Maybelle Carter. Her new band combines the honesty of folk music with the country groove of Asheville, breathing new life into classic country and blues with drums, pedal steel, and electric bass. In the past 15 years, Cary has established herself as a straight ahead folk singer, influenced by her Virginia mountain childhood and years performing at bluegrass festivals with her previous band, The Freight Hoppers. Her natural affinity for folk music and her ability to reach the heart and soul of an audience is evidenced in her show and in her new CD, Down South.

On the back of the CD jacket, Roy Andrade of the Reeltime Travelers folk circuit fame comments,

“Several vital threads of the roots music tapestry have come together here in fine form on Cary Fridley's second solo effort. One of the most poignant traditional artists performing today, Cary moves seamlessly across Memphis electric blues, broken-down honky tonkin’ country, and Appalachian Mountain music. We see through her music that, labels aside, its all about people expressing themselves year after year, generation after generation. Same language, different dialect.”

CARY FRIDLEY DOWN SOUTH
Nationally Acclaimed Folk Artist Highlights Personal Favorites, Collaborations and Debut Original for 17 Selection CD Available September 14 From Juba Records

“She [Cary Fridley] sounds as if she was born to sing of the troubles and simple joys that define old-timey mountain music.”
--Brian Beatty All Music Guide

Traditional folk singer Cary Fridley retraces the back roads of her remarkable musical journey with a personalized, far-reaching CD spotlighting her favorite traditional songs and the debut with her first original country song, Cheatin’. Juba Records showcases this highly recognizable Southern voice with a personal collection of career favorites.

The collection opens with a delicate rendition of the classic blues song When The Levee Breaks, influenced by the singing and guitar of blues great Memphis Minnie. Roy Andrade compliments Cary’s soulful singing with traditional fingerstyle guitar, anchored by the stand-up bass playing of Asheville bluesman Bill Reynolds. In the current wake of Hurricane Katrina, this old song holds heartbreaking poignancy that is hard to ignore. The next selection, Pretty Saro is a ballad from Madison County, NC that was first recorded by Cas Wallin in the 1960’s and is still being passed down. Cary presents it here with Steve Trismen as a duet, accompanied by rhythm guitar and solo fiddle. The CD moves into the classic 1920’s string band sound for several songs led by innovative Weaverville fiddler, Rob Mangum. 7 Mile Ford string band, brought together solely for this recording includes Mangum on fiddle, Roy Andrade on banjo, Daniel Coolik (One Leg Up) on guitar, and Cary Fridley on stand-up bass and vocals. Next, Daniel Coolik highlights the classic guitar of Maybelle Carter with his power-charged solo in Lonesome Homesick Blues. Mangum rides the momentum with the next traditional fiddle tune, Shuckin’ the Brush, a fiddle festival favorite. The band’s first section of the CD ends with a waltz, North Country, by Carol Elizabeth Jones, an influential voice in Southern country and bluegrass music.

Like a sweet sunset the CD eases into Track 6 with the local blues collective The Lowdown Travelers. They keep the solid groove moving with a version of Mississippi R. L. Burnside’s Going Down South, the inspirational track behind the CD. Musicians include Kyle Smith on harp, Scott Sharp on guitar, and Mike Ashworth on drums.

Track 7, You Led Me To The Wrong, is a favorite song of Fridley’s since The Freight Hoppers shows. For this recording, Cary brought in an electric country band, rich harmony vocals, and Waylon Jennings-style guitar by Woody Wood. The song was written by North Carolina native, Ola Belle Reed, an innovative songwriter during the 1960’s folk revival. This murder ballad has a dark feminist side, as the narrator takes the law into her own hands after her man starts “courting her best friend.” Appropriately, Come All You Fair And Tender Ladies is next, using the same modern country instrumentation to highlight this traditional favorite warning young girls of the wiles of dishonest men.

Cheatin’ is Fridley’s first released original country song. Written from the man’s point of view, the lyrics offer compassion for all perspectives of the classic love triangle, a popular theme in country songs.

God Don’t Like It from The Lowdown Travelers is influenced by the classic 78 Blind Willie McTell recording. The lyrics of this song express the writer’s discontent with the moonshine drinkers in the church congregation.

Lily May Ledford of Coon Creek Girls fame first recorded I Have No Mother Now at a live concert at Berea College in the 1960s, which is the inspirational recording behind this track. Research at the Archives of Appalachia confirms its popularity as a ballad collected around Johnson City, TN. Added harmonies and country drums don’t distract from the timelessness of this child’s lament.

Cary’s version of Kitty Wells’ Making Believe blends old-time and modern country ideas with fiddle, electric mandolin, pedal steel, and full vocal harmonies. 7 Mile Ford presents the final three songs in traditional stringband format, beginning with traditional old-time fiddle tune, Dolly, led by Rob Mangum. Scotland Man is also a ballad collected from the mountains of Madison County, NC, which first appeared in a 1960’s art film “The End of An Old Song”. Originally played and sung with banjo only, it is presented here with a full string band sound behind full voice ballad singing. For the final two tunes, Rob and Cary sing the classic Wild Bill Jones murder ballad and then close with Barlow Knife, a traditional Appalachian square dance tune.

The CD Release Date for Down South is September 14, 2007 at The Grey Eagle in Asheville, NC. Cary will be appearing at the Lake Eden Arts Festival in Black Mountain, NC October 19-20, 2007 and also May 19-20, 2008. Please visit www.caryfridley.net and www.myspace.com/caryfridley/ for complete listings and information.

CARY FRIDLEY – DOWN SOUTH
Track Listing

1. When the Levee Breaks 3:16
2. Pretty Saro 4:19
3. Lonesome Homesick Blues 2:53
4. Shucking the Brush 2:35
5. North Country 3:06
6. Going Down South 2:18
7. You Led Me To the Wrong 4:08
8. Come All You Fair and Tender Ladies 2:57
9. Cheatin' 3:14
10. God Don't Like It 4:30
11. I Have No Mother Now 3:44
12. Making Believe 3:50
13. Dolly 2:20
14. Scotland Man 3:48
15. Wild Bill Jones 3:17
16. Barlow Knife 7:15

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Reviews


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David

Down South
I loved the Freight Hoppers, I loved Cary's first solo CD and I love this one. I can't wait for more!
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ernie caldwell

Down South
Another excellent CD by Cary Fridley.
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angus@japan

Down South
I love those "electric Dock Boggs" tracks!
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Sara Hunt


A highly polished album with a strong bluegrass feel
DOWN SOUTH is Cary Fridley’s second solo release and features the 7 Mile Ford band, a string band brought together for the sole purpose of this recording. Cary has, over the past fifteen years, established herself as a strong folk singer, influenced in part by her upbringing in the Virginian Mountains. Her music is heavily tinged with folk, blues, country and bluegrass. When The Levee Breaks kick starts the album in fine style. Cary instantly takes the listener back in time. Cary’s voice obviously suits old style country/bluegrass music. Her voice is captivating and adds great depth and character to the number. Pretty Saro is a song that has been passed down through the generations and is brought to life here as a duet (with Steve Trismen sharing lead vocals). An instrumental section in the middle of this number offers the listener a lovely interlude and a chance to sit back and absorb the atmosphere and magic created by Cary and Steve. Lonesome Homesick Blues is a faster number that follows on in the same theme as the previous two songs. This song is produced in such a way that it sounds like it has come straight out of the 1920’s. Shucking The Brush features the 7 Mile Band and is a wonderfully refreshing instrumental number. North Country is a slow ballad with a strong bluegrass edge. Cary’s voice is rich and once again this song is full of atmosphere. A lovely number that will please bluegrass fans enormously. Going Down South has a strong blues feel to it. Suddenly you have moved out of the mountains and are now deep in Georgia. Cary’s voice slips effortlessly from a traditional bluegrass style to blues. You Led Me To The Wrong sees a return to old style country once again. Cary gives this old ballad a face lift and although it retains its old style charm it also has a wonderfully modern feel to it possibly due to the array of modern instruments used. Come All You Fair And Tender Ladies is a delightful song that again uses an array of modern instruments to bring the song to life and to give it a more up to date feel. Cheatin’ is a carefully crafted old style country song. This is a classy number that would not sound out of place on a country album of many moons a go yet I could also see the likes of Heather Myles performing this song right now. God Don’t Like It is something or a rant about churchgoers who drink moonshine. This song is once again brought to life by the wonderful array of instruments used. I Have No Mother Now is taken from a childhood lament and is a delicate number that easily gets under the listeners skin. Making Believe sees Cary bring to life an old Kitty Wells number. Cary gives this song something of a make-over yet still allows the original sound and style of the song to shine through. A delightful song. Dolly again features the 7 Mile Ford band and is a charming fiddle tune that is sure to get the listeners toes tapping. Scotland Man sees Cary taking centre stage once again. This song has a similar style to that of God Don’t Like It. Wild Bill Jones is sung by Cary and Rob Mangum from the 7 Mile Ford band. This is a murder ballad with a strong bluegrass feel. The album ends with an interesting number called Barlow knife, which is apparently a traditional Appalachian square dance number. A lovely atmospheric number to round of a highly polished collection of largely bluegrass songs. This is an album that shines a light on many old bluegrass and country classics and gives them an updated feel yet still allows them to retain what made them special in the first place - quaint old charm.
Read more...

Sara Hunt

Rewind time
A highly polished album with a strong bluegrass feel
DOWN SOUTH is Cary Fridley’s second solo release and features the 7 Mile Ford band, a string band brought together for the sole purpose of this recording. Cary has, over the past fifteen years, established herself as a strong folk singer, influenced in part by her upbringing in the Virginian Mountains. Her music is heavily tinged with folk, blues, country and bluegrass. When The Levee Breaks kick starts the album in fine style. Cary instantly takes the listener back in time. Cary’s voice obviously suits old style country/bluegrass music. Her voice is captivating and adds great depth and character to the number. Pretty Saro is a song that has been passed down through the generations and is brought to life here as a duet (with Steve Trismen sharing lead vocals). An instrumental section in the middle of this number offers the listener a lovely interlude and a chance to sit back and absorb the atmosphere and magic created by Cary and Steve. Lonesome Homesick Blues is a faster number that follows on in the same theme as the previous two songs. This song is produced in such a way that it sounds like it has come straight out of the 1920’s. Shucking The Brush features the 7 Mile Band and is a wonderfully refreshing instrumental number. North Country is a slow ballad with a strong bluegrass edge. Cary’s voice is rich and once again this song is full of atmosphere. A lovely number that will please bluegrass fans enormously. Going Down South has a strong blues feel to it. Suddenly you have moved out of the mountains and are now deep in Georgia. Cary’s voice slips effortlessly from a traditional bluegrass style to blues. You Led Me To The Wrong sees a return to old style country once again. Cary gives this old ballad a face lift and although it retains its old style charm it also has a wonderfully modern feel to it possibly due to the array of modern instruments used. Come All You Fair And Tender Ladies is a delightful song that again uses an array of modern instruments to bring the song to life and to give it a more up to date feel. Cheatin’ is a carefully crafted old style country song. This is a classy number that would not sound out of place on a country album of many moons a go yet I could also see the likes of Heather Myles performing this song right now. God Don’t Like It is something or a rant about churchgoers who drink moonshine. This song is once again brought to life by the wonderful array of instruments used. I Have No Mother Now is taken from a childhood lament and is a delicate number that easily gets under the listeners skin. Making Believe sees Cary bring to life an old Kitty Wells number. Cary gives this song something of a make-over yet still allows the original sound and style of the song to shine through. A delightful song. Dolly again features the 7 Mile Ford band and is a charming fiddle tune that is sure to get the listeners toes tapping. Scotland Man sees Cary taking centre stage once again. This song has a similar style to that of God Don’t Like It. Wild Bill Jones is sung by Cary and Rob Mangum from the 7 Mile Ford band. This is a murder ballad with a strong bluegrass feel. The album ends with an interesting number called Barlow knife, which is apparently a traditional Appalachian square dance number. A lovely atmospheric number to round of a highly polished collection of largely bluegrass songs. This is an album that shines a light on many old bluegrass and country classics and gives them an updated feel yet still allows them to retain what made them special in the first place - quaint old charm.
Read more...