Glenn Stallcop | Quail Song

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Classical: Contemporary Classical: Piano solo Moods: Type: Improvisational
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Quail Song

by Glenn Stallcop

Expressive original Contemporary Classical Piano Improvisation mixing the plaintive cry of the quail with the brittle stillness of the desert.
Genre: Classical: Contemporary
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
1. Morning Song
8:36 $0.99
2. Quail Run
10:00 $0.99
3. Empty Nest
6:56 $0.99
4. Covey Talk
8:02 $0.99
5. Through the Underbrush
5:15 $0.99
6. Left Alone on a Branch
6:11 $0.99
7. Evening Song
3:31 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Though I grew up in the Pacific Northwest (Seattle), I have lived nearly my entire adult life in the Desert Southwest (Phoenix), having moved here to play in the Phoenix Symphony at the age of 23. Though it was a bit of a shock at first, I have grown to love the desert landscape, its stark but colorful silk-screen topography, no-nonsense flora and fauna, and Technicolor sunsets. Though you would not guess it at first, the Sonoran Desert is the second most diverse biome on the planet, next to only the Amazon Rain Forest. It is continually surprising and fascinating.

Besides the cloudless skies and bottomless sunlight, one of the most notable characteristics of this part of the world is the birdlife. My first morning here I remember being bolted awake by the cacophony of birdsong that has greeted me every morning since. The number and variety is stunning, and it changes as you go from plain to canyon to mountainside to oasis.

One of my favorites is the Gambel’s Quail. They are almost always in small groups racing through the brush or along your fence, flying only if absolutely necessary and driving my cat nuts. They make many different sounds as they keep track of each other in the vegetation, but their “call," usually by a solitary male, is a simple plaintive single note. The note droops or sighs slightly as if he is running out of breath. It is very distinctive and lonely. It is the sound of this album.

That single repeating note is a common call throughout these tracks. Though I cannot make a piano sigh, I do try to give it that timeless lonely quality that it has in the early morning or right before dusk. It appears in various contexts, sometimes subtle, sometimes overt. But, of course, the album itself is about everything else that is going on: the sprays of color, the dense thickets of chords, the emotional outbreaks, the blankets of calm . . . The quail song is just there to remind you that despite all the waves of volatility, life goes on unaffected.

"Morning Song" starts with a rather ominous introduction as the sun rises. The song makes its first appearance in call and response fashion with the other sounds of the morning. After another interlude, its call receives a much more desperate response and then the two mingle together as the desert wakes up.

"Quail Run" is about motion. There is something delightful about watching a quail family race along with a brood of chicks swarming underneath. It is tiny cauldron of boundless energy going in sixteen different directions at once. This track is about running, and parenthood, with an occasional quail song thrown it.

"Empty Nest" hits me closer to home. It begins with an extended slow, almost chorale-like section before gathering energy and moving on – as we must.

"Covey Talk" strikes me as rather domestic. There is much back and forth with some joking and some squabbling ending with a serious panic attack. But things settle down at the end as the quail song is heard and everything returns to normal.

"Through the Underbrush" finds the quail in probably its safest habitat. There is motion but things are more relaxed. The quail song is heard in the distance, and there is a flurry of activity before everything finally settles down for the night.

"Left Alone On a Branch". When a quail is singing is just about the only time you ever see one by itself. The question: “Is the quail alone because it is singing?” or “Does the quail sing because it is alone?” I don’t know. Alone is alone; I’m not sure it matters.

"Evening Song" finds the quail singing accompanied by the colors of sunset, lulling the desert to sleep amid beauty and stillness.

QUAIL SONG is my sixteenth album of solo piano improvisation and was released on July 15, 2017.


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