Gordon Mooney, Barbara Mooney, Shona Mooney, Craig Mooney & David Wood | Time out of Mind on the Border

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Time out of Mind on the Border

by Gordon Mooney, Barbara Mooney, Shona Mooney, Craig Mooney & David Wood

This collection of music for Scottish Smallpipes and Border bagpipes was recorded in 2003 but not published until 2016. It includes several original compositions and arrangements inspired by the Scottish Border landscape.
Genre: Folk: Celtic Folk
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Morpeth Rant Set (feat. Barbara Mooney - Flute, Shona Mooney - Fiddle & David Wood - Guitar)
Gordon Mooney -Scottish Smallpipes
70:45 album only
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2. Bonny at Morn (feat. Barbara Mooney - Flute)
Gordon Mooney - D Whistle, Low D Whistle
70:45 album only
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3. Lammermoor (Dawn) [feat. Barbara Mooney - Oboe, Keyboard]
Gordon Mooney - D Whistle, Low D Whistle
70:45 album only
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4. The Salmon (feat. Brbara Mooney - Clarinet)
Gordon Mooney Scottish Smallpipes
70:45 album only
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5. The Upland Way (feat. Barbara Mooney - Oboe)
Gordon Mooney - Scottish Smallpipes
70:45 album only
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6. The Wild Hills of the Border
Gordon Mooney - Border Bagpipe
70:45 album only
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7. The Cheviot Rant and the Sciatic Rant (feat. Shona Mooney - Fiddle, David Wood - Guitar & Craig Mooney - Bodhran)
Gordon Mooney Border Bagpipe
70:45 album only
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8. Maggie Lauder Set (feat. Shona Mooney - Fiddle & David Wood - Guitar)
Gordon Mooney -Scottish Smallpipes
70:45 album only
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9. Tribute to Jimmy Allen (feat. Barbara Mooney - Flute & Shona Mooney - Fiddle)
Gordon Mooney- Scottish Smallpipes
70:45 album only
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10. Spirit of the Border
Gordon Mooney - Scottish Smallpipes
70:45 album only
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11. Duns Dings A' Set (feat. Barbara Mooney - Flute, Shona Mooney - Fiddle & David Wood - Guitar)
Gordon Mooney - Scottish Smallpipes
70:45 album only
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12. Banks of Kale Water, Earl of Lauderdale (feat. David Wood - Guitar & Craig Mooney - Bodhran)
Shona Mooney - Fiddle
70:45 album only
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13. Reivers Rant, Gala Rant (feat. Barbara Mooney - Bassoon & Shona Mooney - Fiddle)
Gordon Mooney - Border Bagpipe
70:45 album only
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14. Border Air (feat. David Wood - Guitar)
Shona Mooney - Fiddle
70:45 album only
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15. Lammermoor (Evening) [feat. Barbara Mooney - Bassoon & Shona Mooney - Fiddle]
Gordon Mooney - Border Bagpipes
70:45 album only
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Morpeth Rant Set:-These are archive recordings made around 2003 and when we played together as 'O'er the Border Band' we always began with the Morpeth, Rant. This is a pipe version of the 18th Century classic by Shields. The tune appears in a variety of settings for fiddle and can be found in Quebec, Bluegrass and Old Time music. The second tune is The Wind that Shakes the Barley an 18th Century Border tune commemorating a wild storm that destroyed the barley crop for beer and whisky making...boohoo, and the last tune is The Swallow Tail Reel an Irish tune from the playing of Billy Pigg the famous Northumbrian piper. These are all traditional tunes arranged by Gordon Mooney, Barbara Mooney and Shona Mooney.

Bonny at Morn:- Sense of place is vital to understanding traditional music. This old traditional Border song air has a moody uplifting feeling evoking the morning mists drifting over the valleys of the Borderlands. We have arranged it for whistle and flute.

Lammermoor (Dawn):- This tune came to me after a dream on the night of the shooting of the children and their teacher at Dunblane in 1996. Lammermoor is near Lauder where I lived at the time and it is where St Cuthbert as a boy is reputed to have seen the body of St Aidan taken up to heaven by angels. Cuthberts followers built a church nearby and named it "Childskirk". The church is still there in the little village now called Channelkirk.

The Salmon:- The rivers of Scotland and particularly the River Tweed are famed for their salmon. The Celts venerated the salmon as a magical and wise creature able to live in air, salt water and fresh water. They believed that the salmon could cross from the mortal to the spirit world. In this piece the salmon is depicted by the bagpipe - from its early days in the shallows of the river then then the start of its heroic fight out across and back across the ocean to its final desparate struggle up river to spawn and die. The elements of the water surge and storm are portrayed by the clarinet.

The Upland Way:-I wrote this tune in 192 for a show called "A Song for Yarrow" written by Walter Elliot and celebrating the beautiful Yarrow valley in song, music and verse. The "Upland Way" is the long distance footpath that crosses southern Scotland (The Southern Upland Way) but it can refer to the more challenging path that some choose. The pipes signify variations in the path and the oboe weaves wind, sunshine, wildflowers and birds along the way.

The Wild Hills of the Border:- The modal 18th Century Scottish tune called "The Hills of Glenorchy" forms the basis of this piece. Billy Pigg, the virtuoso Northumbrian piper turned the tune into an evocative air with variations and called it 'The Wild Hills of Wannie". In turn I have taken Billy's set and brought it back to the Scottish side of the Border and play it on the Border Bagpipe using 'unorthodox' fingerings to give an edgy feel to try to evoke the desolation and wildness of the Border Hills.

The Cheviot Rant and The Sciatic Rant:- The Cheviot Rant was written by Bill Miller a piano player with the Cheviot Ranters dance band. I first came across this tune in the Alnwick Pipers Society tunebook (1981) and from the playing of Joe Hutton. The tune has almost become an anthem for Northumberland. I wrote the Sciatic Rant while recovering from a slipped disc in 1996. Although I wasn't dancing I was ranting up Lauder High Street.

Maggie Lauder - this traditional tune is for a comic song written by Francis Semple of Beltrees around 1642. The song is a duet between 'Rob the Ranter' (a border piper) and Maggie a lassie from the Burgh of Lauder. The second tune in the set is Corn Riggs are Bonny another old traditional tune used by Robert Burns for a song. The third tune is a march composed by A. Macleod but we play it as a wild reel for dancing. It is the tune used for the Reel of the 51st Division. We end the set with the traditional Border reel 'Roxburgh Castle" commemorating the once mighty Border fortress near Kelso now reduced to rubble.

Tribute to Jimmy Allen:- Jimmy Allen was a famous and infamous 18th |Century Border piper. He was a gypsy from the tribe based in Kirk Yetholm in Scotland. His music has a different flavour from the mainstream of piping particularly the hornpipes and reels we know that he played. These are some of the tunes that he said had been "Played Time out of Mind on the Border". I have tried to capture some of the wildness that Jimmy was famed for in this set. The tunes are Jimmy Allen, Wee Totum Fogg, Geld him Lasses, Geld Him, Coffee and Tea and Skint O' Siller. The last a perennial complaint of musicians! i.e. a shortage of cash.

Spirit of the Border:- This set is dedicated to the musical genius of Tom Clough and Billy Pigg and to their inspiration and enduring influence on pipers and their music.
Spirit of the Border was written by Tom Clough to commemorate the victory of the British Army at El Alamein in World War 2. Skye Crofters was a favourite of Billy Pigg and is in the style of a Scottish Jig but it isn't in Scottish collections. The last tune is called "Billy Pigg's Hornpipe" and is named after the great pipers son. I hav arranged the tune for Scottish smallpipes and play it like a reel.

Duns dings a" set:- This set begins with the traditional Border reel 'Duns Dings A' . The title means that the town of Duns beat everything. The second tune was written by me in 1996 for my fiddle playing daughter. The third tune is called "The Falls of Shin" and written by Barbara McOwen from Boston,USA. The Falls are near Lairg in the Scottish Highlands. The set ends with an 18th Century Highland reel "The Blackcocks of Berriedale" There was a dance that mimicked the courting moves of the blackcock or black grouse. The Berriedale Braes are just north of Helmsdale on the edge of Caithness.

Banks of Kale Water set:- This fabulous reel comes from the playing of the famous Border fiddler Tom Hughes. It is followed by an 18th Century reel from the Gow Collection. Kale Water is the river that runs near the English Border and the Earl of Lauderdale was our immediate neighbour when we lived in Lauder.

The Reivers Rant was composed by Ernest Kirkby and was published in the Alnwick Puipers Society 2nd tunebook in 1988. I have adapted it to suit the extended range of the Border Pipes that were made for me by Nigel Richard. The Gala Rant is an arrangement by me of the Glen Aln Rant by George T. Mitchell.

Border Air:- This beautiful air was passed on to Shona by the very fine fiddler Jimmy Nagle who is the grandson of the famous Border fiddler Tom Hughes.The tune has a haunting feeling that conjures up the enduring dreamlike quality of many Border landscapes.

Lammermoor (Evening):- This is a second arrangement of this tune played on the Border pipes with bassoon and fiddle accompaniment. At the end of the day the sunsets in the Border sky can be astounding as reds, blues, golds and silvers mix over the timeless land. Then as night falls and the wind rises Reivers may be afoot.....

Last night a wind from Lammermoor came roaring up the glen,
With the tramp of trooping horses and the laugh of reckless men,
And struck a mailed hand on the gate and cried in rebel glee,
"Come forth, Come forth, my Borderer, and ride the March with me!"
I said , "Oh! Wind of Lammermoor, the night's too dark to ride,
And all the men that fill the glen are ghosts of men that died!
The floods are down in Bowmont Burn, the moss is fetlock deep,
Go back, Wild Wind of Lammermoor, to Lauderdale - and sleep!"

From the Raiders- by Will H. Ogilvie (1920)

Born in 1951, Gordon grew up in Edinburgh and started bagpipes in 1958 with Hance Gates who was a Pipe Major of Edinburgh City Police. After playing in Boys Brigade and Royal High School pipebands he went on to study Town Planning at Dundee Art School. In Dundee he met traditional folk song and fiddle at Dundee Folk Club and heard Northumbrian smallpipes played by Billy Pigg on the John Peel radio show. While working in Edinburgh he was drawn to the folk revival scene at Sandy Bells pub and at the Linlithgow Folk Club where he met Jimmy Anderson of the Clutha and Rab Wallace of the Whistlebinkies who were also members of the world famous Muirhead Pipe Band. Encouraged to join the band, Gordon spent a year in intense tuition with Pipe Sergeant Davy Hutton. The rigour of that training took Gordon's playing to a new level. After Muirheads folded, Gordon played with Kinneil Colliuery pipeband and was for several years Town Piper of Linlithgow. During the late 1970's he began researching Lowland piping music and instruments and took up the Northumbrian smallpipes. In 1981 with Mike Rowan and Hugh Cheape he formed the Lowland and Border Pipers Society and through contact with pipemaker Colin Ross brought about the revival in playing and making Scottish Smallpipes and Border pipes. In 1983/4 he published his collections of music for the Lowland and Border Bagpipes and a Tutor for the instruments. In 1985 he produced the ground breaking and acclaimed album "O'er the Border". His tutor for Northumbrian smallpipes was Joe Hutton, an inspiration to Gordon and so many others. Gordon's expressive and innovative playing has taken him to perform in Europe, North America and throughout the UK with the band O'er the Border and with his famous fiddle playing daughter Shona and as a duo with harpist and whistle player, Nancy Lyon.
Now retired from a career in Town Planning he lives in Quebec and continues to perform,teach and make instruments.

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