Heather Taves | Sonorities: The 20th Century Piano Sonata

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Classical: Piano solo Classical: Twentieth Century Moods: Mood: Virtuoso
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Sonorities: The 20th Century Piano Sonata

by Heather Taves

Distinguished Canadian concert pianist Heather Taves performs two virtuoso piano works. The “great big sound” of these works, as Carter put it, is an exploration of bell-like sonorities. Motives in thirds are built into a panoramic soundscape. The music resounds with the turbulent clashes of twentieth century conflict, fought by similar rules but with very different conclusions reached.
Genre: Classical: Piano solo
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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-Flat Minor, Op. 36: I. Allegro agitato
11:45 $0.99
clip
2. Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-Flat Minor, Op. 36: II. Non allegro - Lento
8:01 $0.99
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3. Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-Flat Minor, Op. 36: III. Allegro molto
8:23 $0.99
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4. Piano Sonata: I. Maestoso-Scorrevole
11:28 $0.99
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5. Piano Sonata: II. Allegro Giusto
13:56 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

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Album Notes
SONORITIES:
The 20th Century Piano Sonata

What could Russian romantic virtuoso Sergei Rachmaninoff, caught in the turmoil of 1913 just before his escape from Russia during World War I, have in common with American modernist composer Elliott Carter, contemplating the end of World War II in 1945-6?

The answer is that each wrote a 42-page piano sonata, fascinatingly similar in technique, structure, and expression. Both introduce booming bass octaves in Bs, A sharps, or B flats, continue with scurrying sixteenth notes, then segue into a melody marked “Meno Mosso” (less movement). In both, a chordal slow movement, expanded with improvisatory passagework, breaks into a fiendishly difficult finale.

The “great big sound” of these works, as Carter put it, is an exploration of bell-like sonorities. Motives in thirds are built into a panoramic soundscape. The music resounds with the turbulent clashes of twentieth century conflict, fought by similar rules but with very different conclusions reached.

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