Heels | Good People Even Do Bad Things

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Metal/Punk: American Punk Rock: Acoustic Moods: Mood: Brooding
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Good People Even Do Bad Things

by Heels

Stripped-down punk rock duo from Memphis, TN with songs that are equal parts ragers and conversationalists.
Genre: Metal/Punk: American Punk
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Antics
0:41 $0.99
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2. I’ll Have a Name Someday
2:57 $0.99
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3. A Box of Porn in the Woods
2:46 $0.99
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4. King Drunk
3:55 $0.99
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5. Bright Red
3:19 $0.99
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6. Are You a Goddamned Vampire
2:50 $0.99
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7. Picking Fights
1:15 $0.99
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8. Resealable
2:37 $0.99
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9. Compost
2:55 $0.99
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10. Post Pardon
3:51 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
HEELS is the combined effort of Joshua McLane and Brennan Whalen. A two-piece band from Memphis, TN, they started as a stripped down acoustic outfit in 2015. Over the course of the last few years they have evolved into a fast paced electric punk outfit with a heavy melodic sensibility. Equal parts ragers and conversationalists, HEELS writes pop songs for a dying planet.

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Reviews


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John Dylan Atkins

Best album of 2019 so far
To horribly paraphrase Jeff Tweedy from Wilco in his autobiography Let's Go (So We Can Get Back) "I used to think that being punk was the rebelling against things. Now I think the most punk rock thing to do is to care about something." This is the driving sentiment for me when listening to Heels new album Good People Even Do Bad Things. If you aren't careful you may mistake Brennan Whalen's well crafted poetic punk imagery as adolescent indulgence which is why I'm warning you to pay attention to this wonderfully crafted album. Underneath the surface of every song on this mostly face paced, in your face ride is a love and a respect you rarely see on an album these days, especially one with punk sensibilities. This well meaning and mature album from Altercation Records is a diamond in the rough from a very strong Memphis punk scene. Whalen and drummer Josh McLane have made an album that merits relisten after relisten. Whalen's way with words, swift guitar and strong baritone mixed with McLane's frantic, driving drums and sometimes scene stealing backup vocals is a basket full of treats to indulge in again and again.

On the short acoustic tune "Antics" at the top of the album they set the tone by telling you "I've been a Jugalo for most of my life and I'm bad at brushing my teeth," and end with a stark line "I don't love you," subverting your expectation while starting to show the love mentioned before because nothing is more full of love than having the courage to tell someone your true feelings.

On my personal favorite track "A Box of Porn in the Woods," Whalen effectively and poetically uses images one would not expect to express a deep love but it's more effective than any pop song you'll here on the radio with its gritty realness. This song should be on all rock stations immediately.

While "Resealable" is the most poppy song of the bunch it seems like the love child of The Clash and The Ramones which is impressive territory to be in. It has my favorite straight forward, uplifting line of the album, "Maybe I'll get sober, I might even have me a couple kids, fall in love with a nice girl, change our names and pretend we never did." It's a reminder to us all that it's never too late to change yourself for the better.

In "Picking Fights" Heels issue a warning to take your hate somewhere else and repeatingly shout fuck you as the hook. Again, on first listen this may sound like a rebellious, adolescent punk song when underneath it's an anthem about respecting others. This dichotomy makes this track shine.

The penultimate song "Compost" is the most heartwrenching song on the album. The guitar line floats along with Whalen's performance full of quiet desperation and full resolve. The vocal melody reels you in so the lyrics can break you.

On the albums final track "Post Pardon" the guitar, drums, and vocals all drive and scream redemption until the bridge eases you with a false sense of security. Then after the most effective break I've ever heard on a punk album they roar right back with that high energy redemption. If you've ever found yourself at a rock bottom this song will resonate.

Every song has its standout moments. "I'll Have a Name Someday," moving from its slow sustains to an upbeat song driven by McLane's relentless drums and fills. "King Drunk" has such a catchy guitar line that you will find yourself humming it in the shower or while doing laundry to lift you out of your mundane task. "Bright Red" starts with the heartbreakingly frank line "When I dream of you it fucks up my whole day," but the main point being driven home through the darkness of this song is "I don't think where we're going is Hell." Whalen's reassuring upper baritone convinces you everything will end up all right. The rich lyricism of "Are You a Goddamned Vampire" and the driving drums set the track up for one of the more layered opportunities for multiple listens. Just because time limited these songs from bigger blurbs does not say anything about their quality because there is no weak song in this collection.

Good People Even Do Bad Things is much needed in the climate of our current world. If we could all find the love in hard to find places like Heels have so miraculously and meticulously done the world would be better for it. Either way this stand out album from my new favorite Memphis band and Altercation Records has left the world a better place than it was before.
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