KP Devlin | Spirit of the Mule

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kpdevlin.com

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United States - New York

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Pop: Folky Pop Country: Country Pop Moods: Solo Male Artist
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Spirit of the Mule

by KP Devlin

K.P. Devlin's Spirit of the Mule offers songs full of wonderful wordplay and records the highs and lows of life near the end of the twentieth century. His songwriting is deceptively simple -- but subsequent listenings reveal subtlety and depth.
Genre: Pop: Folky Pop
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Everything
4:28 $0.99
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2. Still Young
3:28 $0.99
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3. Five in the Evening
3:16 $0.99
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4. Box of Blue Velvet
5:09 $0.99
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5. Another Night With You
4:15 $0.99
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6. Open Doors
4:39 $0.99
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7. Where is Alice Now?
4:20 $0.99
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8. Pink Elephants & Purple Dinosaurs
4:36 $0.99
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9. Adrian's Lament
5:51 $0.99
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10. October Song
5:31 $0.99
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11. Walkin' the Plank
3:25 $0.99
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12. Holding Hearts
3:30 $0.99
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13. When Your Angels Wore Different Wings (Spirit of the Mule)
4:30 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
From the impassioned opening lines of "Everything" to the final rueful strains of "When Your Angels Wore Different Wings," K.P. Devlin's Spirit of the Mule offers up songs full of wonderful wordplay and allusion to the highs and lows of life near the end of the twentieth century. His lyrics often seem simple and straightforward enough, but subsequent listenings reveal subtlety and depth.

Folk Rock

K.P. Devlin writes songs. He then sings them. His music is at times intense, passionate and cynical, sometimes hilarious, occasionally dark and almost vicious, and quite often, a mixture of all of the above. Musically, he has tapped into many familiar genres (rock, folk, Celtic, blues and country), and his songs often have a "familiar" quality to them (as though you've heard them before, even though you know you haven't), and yet there is something refreshing about them as well.

It is believed that K.P. Devlin was born in a large city somewhere in the United States. However, some folks claim he is originally from Newfoundland, and still others are of the notion that he was raised by shepherds in a small village in Albania. He has spent significant amounts of time in Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Atlanta, Austin and New York City (which he has called home for quite some time). He was reportedly seen entering the borough of Manhattan last week, riding upon a gray mule. Perched atop the mule (whose name turns out to be Tigerlily), plodding along the walkway atop the Brooklyn Bridge, Devlin strummed his guitar. Seemingly unconcerned by the din of traffic down below, he was working on a new song. For that is what K.P. Devlin does. He writes songs. He then sings them. After listening to his first two CD's, "Spirit of the Mule" (1995), and "Scarecrow Land" (1997), it becomes evident that his influences include Bob Dylan, Tom Waits, Bruce Cockburn and Lou Reed. Lyrically, Devlin's songs are at times intense, passionate and cynical, sometimes hilarious, occasionally dark and almost vicious, and quite often, a mixture of all of the above. Musically, he has tapped into many familiar genres (rock, folk, Celtic, blues and country), and his songs often have a "familiar" quality to them (as though you've heard them before, even though you know you haven't), and yet there is something refreshing about them as well. Music critic, Basil Palthmeyer, says of Devlin's song "Pink Elephants & Purple Dinosaurs," "[it's] enough to make Dylan wish he were young again." And according to Christopher Hess of the Austin Chronicle, "He comes to Texas from NYC via parts unknown with a swagger in his voice and an edge to his pen that will definitely raise eyebrows." On Devlin's brand new CD, "Harlequin's Elbow" (co-produced by Devlin and former Bob Dylan bassist, Kenny Aaronson), he presents us with 10 new songs, as well as wonderful reworkings of two of his older tunes, "Everything" and "Camelia." The album features an outstanding cast of supporting players, and is, without a doubt, Devlin's most powerful work to date.

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