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Aldebaran | ocre et rouge

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Frank Zappa Igor Stravinsky Joe Jackson King Crimson Peter Gabriel

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Rock: 90's Rock Pop: 90's Pop
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ocre et rouge

by Aldebaran

The 12 songs on O&R scan different musical styles. You might say they range from trip-hop (L'Orque épaulard) to progressive-rock (Risin in love, Whales, Plus lourds que l'air), from european/alternative pop (A Rome, Verres fumés) to dance/jung
Genre: Rock: 90's Rock
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. L'Orque Epaulard
5:42 album only
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2. Plus Lourds Que L'Air
5:52 album only
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3. Nature's Law
2:11 album only
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4. Music For Free
5:41 album only
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5. Ocre Et Rouge
5:17 album only
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6. Vu D'Ici
3:45 album only
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7. Risin In Love
4:22 album only
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8. Whales
6:10 album only
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9. Verres Fumes
4:41 album only
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10. Victoire De La Nuit
3:59 album only
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11. A Rome
2:55 album only
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12. Comme Des Fouets
2:53 album only

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Fans of guitar-driven rock/pop will find much to enjoy about Aldebaran's Ocre et Rouge. The album starts with a long intro to "L'Orque Epaulard" featuring cool guitar riffs. It's a savvy move that highlights Aldebaran's strength - the music. And you don't need to understand French to appreciate these songs. In fact, ignorance may indeed be bliss, at least while listening to Aldebaran. It frees you to immerse yourself in the music, the ambience, and the European-rock flavor of the album. The 12 songs on O&R scan different musical styles. You might say they range from trip-hop (L'Orque épaulard) to progressive-rock (Risin in love, Whales, Plus lourds que l'air), from european/alternative pop (A Rome, Verres fumés) to dance/jungle (Victoire de la nuit) or psychedelic rock (Comme des fouets). Name the genres. But there's still a unity of moods and themes. O&R is a collection of different perceptions of the world, like a collection of paintings that would convey different sensitivities about the same topic: the topic is simply - or too ambitiously! - Mister World (unless you call it Madame Mother-Goddess Ga•a): depicted from the shore as whales swim by, from Tahiti in the skin of a "peintre maudit", from Gagarin's tiny orbiting spacecraft, from the sunny terrasse of a french café, from the heights of an inspiring sleepless night, from the ever-rising (watch for the fall, man) heights of love. Hence for a very visual album, a strongly art-oriented cover showing the indian/primitive petroglyphs on rock, and the modern graffitis on concrete...what has changed between now and then? Now you pay a fine if get caught!

Guitar-driven rock/pop featuring cool guitar riffs and a Euro-rock flavor. You don't need to understand French to appreciate these songs! Music that ranges trip-hop to progressive-roc , from european/alternative pop to dance/jungle (Victoire de la nuit) or psychedelic rock. But there's still a unique unity of moods and themes.

Alternative Pop

Guitar-driven rock/pop featuring cool guitar riffs and a Euro-rock flavor. Music that ranges trip-hop to progressive-rock , from european/alternative pop to dance/jungle or psychedelic rock. But there's still a unique unity of moods and themes. Aldebaran's strength is its music. And you don't need to understand French to appreciate these songs. In fact, ignorance may indeed be bliss - It frees you to immerse yourself in the music, the ambience, and the European-rock flavor of the band.

ALDEBARAN is a weird collision between France and California (imagine the Big One has torn the state along the Sierras and thrown LA's big chunk of cars and concrete against the French coast of Brittany). It's a friendship (the hardest to imagine for certain bands). It's the encounter of a few of LA's top musicians with a French songwriter (who's also an astrophysicist. Science and art may coexist nicely when they both provide in their own way a source of inspiration and amazement at the world). His real name is protected by the use of the pseudonym Charles Askell). Since he initiated the project, let's hand him the keyboard so that he tells you himself how it started: Hi (change of voice) Well, since I'm given this opportunity to directly talk to you...my name is Charles. As you've been told already, I'm beginning a career in Astrophysics in France. I spent 4 years from 91 to 95 in LA, Pasadena to be precise, in order to work with NASA's JPL as a scientist. Meanwhile I wrote a bunch of songs in English, influenced my new surroundings (although I'm still more comfortable when writing songs in French, a language which allows many tricks and subtleties in songs. I have to write simpler lyrics in English, otherwise my friends say it makes no sense at all - which may also be true in French songs but is usually welcome as poetry). Anyway, the songs were piling up, as dirty plates in your kitchen sink. I met Tom Freeman at the Renaissance Pleasure Fair, which takes place every year on the foothills of San Bernardino. It was very hot (in every meaning), and I was waiting in line in front of the toilets to make room for some new refreshing beers, in a floating aroma of recycled beer, herbs, and 16th-17th century ladies perfume (I don't know whether they had such perfumes in those days, but they surely had nice lungs to spread them on!). "Hey! you must be from Europe, man!" That was Tom guessing; he was wearing the Californian T-shirt and shorts as surely as I was wearing my sophisticated Italian shirt, with the lower part in the pants. We talked about our respective jobs. I learned he had just finished playing drums on Mike Keneally's "hat" album (by the way, if you don't know Mike yet, listen to his keyboards/guitars on Frank Zappa's last recordings, and don't miss his amazing albums "hat" and "boil that dust speck": astonishing musicianship!). Otherwise (beside Zappa), Tom likes XTC, Peter Gabriel, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Robert Fripp and King Crimson, Joe Jackson, Todd Rundgren, Stravinsky. A joyful melting pot of tastes which I can pretty much recognize as my own. Since Tom has an astounding collection of concert videos and demos and bootlegs of everything that exists on Earth, we spent many evenings sacrificing wine and saying weird prayers on the AUDIO/VIDEO autel that occupies the 2/3 of his living room. One day, I played Tom a couple of 4-track demos that I had just done, and asked him what he thought. Should we record a better demo of these songs with a band? So we embarked on this limited project. Ray Palmer was to play the bass, and we looked for a good guitar player. Finding that took me months. Every bar waiter in LA is a musician too, sure, but not necessarily the kind we wanted. "Let's ask Paul Davis!", Tom said. Paul is more than a good guitar player. He was the pillar of Bonnie Haye's band, at the time they were famous in the bay area. Recently, Paul had mostly been playing gigs with T-Lou's Super Hot Zydeco band. So I called Paul. On the phone, we talked about French food, about all the great and spicy ways to accommodate meat, and pork in particular. I liked that! A good start... We recorded 6 tunes in November 94 at King Sound Studio, Jimmy Sloan's little studio crammed with the best preamps and mikes ever made, from East Germany and places which are not even on a map. There's a real nice vibe at King Sound. And try his brownies! If you want a good earthy greasy guitar blues sound, that's the place to put your recorder on. And Jimmy knows what "sound" means. Then in early 95, Ray got a professor position on the East Coast, and started packing his family for the move. I myself wasn't sure of staying in LA much longer, for similar reasons. Tom, Paul and I then decided to record more songs, so that we'd have a finished product in our hands. It's Jef Hogan, whom I met later, who suggested first going for a commercialisable LP. Jef Hogan plays bass and spends most of his time (very hectic Jef) producing and organizing music festivals. He's been Tom Schnable's engineer and assistant at KCRW for years. Hence his taste for curious, bizarre and exotic musics, including the odd French stuff. He offered to help on the production. So we went back to the studio in the summer 95. We wanted a different type of production, requiring a few overdubs and definitely more than 16 tracks, and we went to 48-Windows, which is another very cool place in Hollywood. Eric Garcia, sometimes assisted by Alex De Rafols and Ziv Fischer (who plays drums on Verres Fumés and Victoire de la Nuit: no, it's not a drum machine!), recorded our basic tracks in just a couple of days. 48-Windows is also a nice place, a post-production studio with comfortable rooms and wooden furniture where everyone is friendly and works hard. We had a lot of fun, and we felt this was a special recording, before I left for France, since it would probably decide later whether we would work together again or not. It took another couple of days to add vocals and additional instruments (viola, accordion, sax, vielle à roue, precessions), then a week to mix the album (with Matt Thorne). I hear you ask: what took so much time between the fall of '95 and the fall of '96, date of release? You're so curious! I like you...Well, I flew back to France and had to orchestrate the final stages of the project from Paris, with Jef helping in LA, on the sequencing/mastering, designing the booklet, printing the CDs. Jef has done a lot. But most importantly, we had to create the legal environment to commercialize the album, and promote it both in the US and in France: set up a publishing company, create an association, register with the various performing rights societies, pay fees, get the money to pay other fees, and so on...(Things are a bit different on this side of the Atlantic: starting a business is a complex and frustrating experience, more like some sort of video game where you'd try to avoid all the unexpected obstacles that pop out on your way as you advance.) And nowww, laiiidies n' gennn-tlemen! Now is the album we're proud to share with you. Now is OCRE ET ROUGE (pronounced OCRE A ROOJ). And we hope you like it. The ALDEBARAN project is just beginning!

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Jef Hogan

Hey Morvan where are you? Call me or write me.
Every person on the planet should own this record!
Thank you for your art Charles
jh
hoganbuffa@gmail.com
310.717.1265
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