The Ism | Get Things

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Rock: Grunge Rock: Punk Moods: Type: Lo-Fi
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Get Things

by The Ism

Two-piece dystopian collage, woven with smashed guitars and a mouthful of cassette tape.
Genre: Rock: Grunge
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Intro
0:22 $0.99
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2. Too Late To Die Young
3:41 $0.99
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3. Aqueous Humor
3:43 $0.99
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4. Regurgitator
4:01 $0.99
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5. Amaj
8:14 $0.99
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6. Common Scent
5:15 $0.99
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7. Intermission
0:29 $0.99
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8. Hot Jacket
4:59 $0.99
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9. Come On
5:08 $0.99
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10. Moral Compass
3:37 $0.99
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11. Kommander
2:33 $0.99
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12. Get Things
4:20 $0.99
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13. Reprise (Slight Return)
8:54 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
The Ism is the brainchild of two AR artists, Jesse Bridges and Charlie Griggs. Their debut album, 'Get Things', is an ambitious album that covers much ground; equal parts concept album and art record, it weaves influences from genres as disparate as punk, psychedelia, new wave, and garage rock into a listening experience that is everything but dull.

The band's name came from a desire to comment on society's "-ism's", and the songs on 'Get Things' do so justly. Tracks such as 'Kommander' and 'Moral Compass' make concise statements on war and religion, while 'Too Late to Die Young' and the album's title track 'Get Things' convey the group's disillusionment with ideals based on status and materialism that pervade the masses today. Even the "lighter" fare on the album, such as 'Hot Jacket' and 'C'mon!' deliver commentaries that subtly make themselves heard to the listener, without overshadowing the spontaneous fun of the songs.

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