Order 3 or more physical items and get 1¢ shipping
Jeffrey Dean Foster | The Leaves Turn Upside Down

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
Neil Young Sparklehorse Tom Petty

Album Links
Jeffrey Dean Foster PassAlong QtrNote Tradebit Audio Lunchbox MusicIsHere PayPlay Apple iTunes Bitmunk BuyMusic GroupieTunes

More Artists From
United States - North Carolina

Other Genres You Will Love
Rock: Americana Country: Country Rock Moods: Mood: Dreamy
There are no items in your wishlist.

The Leaves Turn Upside Down

by Jeffrey Dean Foster

Primitive as a field recording, punk-like in attitude, and wholly futuristic. Great songs floating in space. Tune in.
Genre: Rock: Americana
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Sign up for the CD Baby Newsletter
Your email address will not be sold for any reason.
Continue Shopping
cd in stock order now
Share to Google +1

To listen to tracks you will need to update your browser to a recent version.

  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Lottery
1:49 $0.99
clip
2. Lover True
3:53 $0.99
clip
3. Forgotten My Name
4:26 $0.99
clip
4. Jesus Spoke
4:52 $0.99
clip
5. Skin and Bone
4:08 $0.99
clip
6. So Lonesome I Could Fly
5:01 $0.99
clip
7. The Leaves Turn Upside Down
2:08 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
JEFFREY DEAN FOSTER
The Leaves Turn Upside Down
Taking a break from the Pinetops, Jeffrey Dean Foster has created a solo work that's an imaginative live/studio album hybrid. Six of the seven tunes are lo-fi live recordings that Foster has linked with studio-added, short-wave-like samples, which add a beguiling, haunting quality to the music. Three numbers ("Lottery," "So Lonesome I Could Fly" and "Jesus Spoke") are live renditions of songs from the Pinetops' Above Ground And Vertical disc. This disc's title track - and the sole studio effort - is a moody instrumental that fits in well with the other tracks.
It's definitely NOT "Frampton Comes Alive!"

NO DEPRESSION MAGAZINE had this to say about the record.

A talented North Carolina songwriter and a twang-pop vet from the '80s (with The Right Profile) and early '90s (Carneys), Jeffrey Dean Foster made a splash in 1998 with the Pinetops and their disc Above Ground and Vertical. This acoustic live EP is a solo stop-gap between studio records; as such the low-fi, clinking-beer-bottle ambiance conveys pleasures of the fleetingly intimate, rather than the ornately crafted, sense.
The charm of new compositions (the strummy, jangly "Lover True", which neatly plays with the phrasings of "lover" and "love her") and Pinetops material (the beautiful spectral drone of the aptly titled "So Lonesome I Could Fly") gets cemented by Foster's keening upper register, a satisfying cross between Roger McGuinn and Alex Chilton. There's left-field artistry afoot as well: Looped in short-wave and electronic sounds and brief keyboard segments serves as segues, lending the set a spooky but appropriate autumnal vibe.
- FRED MILLS

"an Andy-Warhol-goes-techno/acoustic-in-the-predawn-hours feel that is quite ingenious."

- William Michael Smith-Rockzilla.net

"It's a work that is at once primitive as a field recording; punk-like in attitude, and wholly futuristic. It is a fascinating concept and one that, in Foster's hands, works like a charm.

- Ed Bumgardner WS Journal

Stay tuned for a brand new studio album soon and check out JEFFREY DEAN FOSTER'S previous record, The Pinetops, ABOVE GROUND AND VERTICAL.(also available from CDBABY)


Foster is one of North Carolina's finest songwriters, possessing a talent on par with such celebrated homeboys as Ryan Adams and Ben Folds. Foster is idiosyncratic yet accessible, a product of a classic-rock upbringing (peak years, in his estimation: 1972-78) who exhibits a quietly stubborn, do-it-yourself streak.
He has come close to tasting fame but is disinclined to compromise himself to make it. After all, it was Foster, as a co-leader of the Right Profile, who walked away from a deal with Arista Records, not the other way around. The Right Profile left behind the better part of an album at Arista when it split in 1988. His next band, the Carneys, tried to cut an organic rock record at a time when computers, producers and technology ruled. That, too, went unreleased. Foster was simply in the right place at the wrong time and was not about to bend in the absurd directions that the music industry demanded. Had they come along a few years later, the Carneys and the Right Profile might now be hailed, along with Uncle Tupelo, as cornerstones of the back-to-basics Americana movement.
Parke Puterbaugh(WS Journal)

After performing solo from Atlanta to Buffalo in the '90s, Foster teamed up with old pal and legendary producer Don Dixon. They took a batch of songs and a floating group of musicians and started recording. Out of these sessions came a new band, The Pinetops, and an highly acclaimed new record, Above Ground and Vertical.

Released in the states by Soundproof/Monolyth (www.monolyth.com) and in Europe by Bluerose Records (www.bluerose-records.com) the recording drew praise from all corners.

After some brief touring in support of Above Ground and Vertical, including a spectacular appearance at SXSW in Austin, Foster began work on what would be the follow-up to AGAV. More of a solo effort (with a little help from some friends), it promises to be a more left-of-center record, both emotionally and musically and both harder rocking and more atmospheric than previous recordings.

Over the past year or so, Foster recorded a handful of solo acoustic live shows and a new live ep, "the leaves turn upside down", is the result. Leaves combines 6 live-performance tracks with other studio and found sounds. It's been said that the leaves turn upside down sounds more like a foreign short-wave radio transmission than a traditional live record.

Stay tuned for a brand new studio album soon and check out JEFFREY DEAN FOSTER'S previous record, The Pinetops, ABOVE GROUND AND VERTICAL.(also available from CDBABY)

Read more...

Reviews


to write a review

William Michael Smith/rockzilla.net

an Andy-Warhol-goes-techno/acoustic-in-the-predawn-hours feel that is quite inge
Foster has done some very interesting, un-unplugged things with the leaves turn upside down. Mostly recorded live at that venerable Winston-Salem institution, The Garage, Foster has taken the recording in seemingly contrary directions but has ended up with a disc that is quite unified and more than a bit conceptually daring.

One sonic direction Foster has taken through his production vision gives what is on the surface an extremely minimalist instrumental and vocal presentation a Technicolor aura. Foster has interposed found sounds (one seems to be bacon sizzling in a skillet), odd clips from radio evangelists, and brief, moody studio instrumental segues that give the disc an Andy-Warhol-goes-techno/acoustic-in-the-predawn-hours feel that is quite ingenious. According to Foster, he wanted the EP to seem like a haphazard spin across the late-night radio dial.

As for the other direction, rather than this live recording being a group of songs surrounded by thunderous applause and supportive yells of adulation from adoring fans, in the finest indie fashion Foster has quite clearly caught the mindless bar chatter and the scraping of chairs and the sounds of bottles breaking, as though he has turned the microphones toward the audience rather than toward himself. In mixing the bar sounds with the performances, we get the idea of what a performer actually hears as he tries to create his art for the paying public. We hear quite clearly the interference the performer must overcome. Within the context of the performances and this recording, the crowd sounds almost indifferent, even frequently distracted and unfocused. Foster succeeds in casting the performance as an intimidating prospect, a beast to be conquered. After opening with the Pinetops tune "Lottery," Foster quips, "Welcome to the late, late, late, late show" in response to a scattered smatter of subdued applause. The vibe is very un-rock star.

But Jeffrey Dean Foster is sneaking up on us here. The unusual production aesthetic and mix actually work to demonstrate Foster's considerable talent as he eventually supercedes the crowd interference, overcoming the static in the channels with the force of his performance and his brilliant lyrics. Foster reprises several of his Pinetops tracks ("Lottery," "Jesus Spoke," and the incandescent "So Lonesome I Could Fly"), but it is his new material that shows the songwriting power that is Mr. Foster's ace in the hole. There is no avoiding his lyrical images and his dry insightful musings. His plaintive vocal on "Forgotten My Name" should remind listeners of Steve Forbert in his more melancholy moods. This song alone won me over.

I saw her sister, I saw her candy-red hair
Down at the courthouse in a dress she used to wear
She said "My sister's no genius, but at least she's not insane"
Baby made her escape and she's forgotten my name

While he's had a 20-year career and, in his words, has written a "truckload of songs," Mr. Foster remains something of an underground, word-of-mouth phenomenon outside his regional base. Unless you bought one of the 3,000 copies of The Pinetops Above Ground and Vertical (unlikely since half of them were sold in Europe) or you are from around Winston-Salem, North Carolina, it's doubtful you've heard or heard of Jeffrey Dean Foster. Yet his the leaves turn upside down clearly demonstrates that is a condition you'll want to remedy if you are a fan of heady singer-songwriters.

Read more...

Fred Mills

No Depression Magazine Jan- Feb. 2002
A talented North Carolina songwriter and a twang-pop vet from the ‘80s (with The Right Profile) and early ‘90s (Carneys), Jeffrey Dean Foster made a splash in 1998 with the Pinetops and their disc Above Ground and Vertical. This acoustic live EP is a solo stop-gap between studio records; as such the low-fi, clinking-beer-bottle ambiance conveys pleasures of the fleetingly intimate, rather than the ornately crafted, sense.
The charm of new compositions (the strummy, jangly “Lover True”, which neatly plays with the phrasings of “lover” and “love her”) and Pinetops material (the beautiful spectral drone of the aptly titled “So Lonesome I Could Fly”) gets cemented by Foster’s keening upper register, a satisfying cross between Roger McGuinn and Alex Chilton. There’s left-field artistry afoot as well: Looped in short-wave and electronic sounds and brief keyboard segments serves as segues, lending the set a spooky but appropriate autumnal vibe.
- FRED MILLS

Read more...

Margot Carmichael Lester

A beautiful pastiche of stark contrasts
Most live albums feature hordes of screaming fans singing along to their favorite songs while the band takes a self-indulgent breather. Not so on Jeffrey Dean Fosters’ limited edition seven-song EP, The Leaves Turn Upside Down. “It illustrates what it’s like to play to all kinds of people in a bar,” he says. “Not always pretty, but occasionally rewarding.” Mixing songs from studio sessions and live shows, the former Pinetops frontman creates beautiful pastiche of stark contrasts. Several of the tunes appeared on the Pinetops’ “Above Ground and Vertical” (Monolith). An unplugged “Jesus Spoke” is full of great lines, such as “a full-blown case of the been everywheres”. Similarly, the live redux of “So Lonesome I Could Fly” just soars. As people talk over the song, Foster sounds completely alone even in a room full of people, and he makes you feel that, too.. Among the new numbers is “Skin & Bone”, which opens with a melancholy piano and ramps up into a great guitar riff. The song’s about being a prisoner in yourself and finally breaking free and is beautifully paced, sort of winding down at the close as life does. “Forgotten My Name” is a poignant number about the one that got away: “my sister’s no genius/but at least she’s not insane/baby made her escape/she’s forgotten your name”. Throughout the lyrics and music are vintage Foster – thoughtful, heartfelt and rootsy. Each song is linked by spoken word, ambient samples and other sounds, evoking, as Foster says, “a foreign short-wave broadcast.” Overall, the record has a terrific texture that’s DIY and smooth at the same time. Certainly a great harbinger of the full-length record due out later this year. (Margot Carmichael Lester)
Read more...