John Foster Elliott | Directions in Life for the Occasionally Confused

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Spoken Word: With Music Easy Listening: Soft Rock
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Directions in Life for the Occasionally Confused

by John Foster Elliott

Spoken Word and Soft Rock for Healing the Heart and Growing Your Spirit
Genre: Spoken Word: With Music
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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Diamonds Come from Coal
4:42 $0.99
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2. Maps for Change
15:19 $0.99
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3. Perfect Mistakes
2:01 $0.99
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4. Cycling
3:35 $0.99
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5. The Middle Ground
6:06 $0.99
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6. Like Water
3:08 $0.99
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7. How to Meditate
7:01 $0.99
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8. Travel with the Wind
4:20 $0.99
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9. About Love
7:23 $0.99
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10. Moth to a Flame
3:37 $0.99
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11. Beat of a Heart
3:33 $0.99
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12. Zen Bluz
3:07 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Reviews For Directions in Life

Scott Miller, PhD, author of the Heart and Soul of Change, - states, “John Elliott tells stories with the depth of Socrates, the insight of a Zen Master and the wit of Dave Berry.” Gary Cooper, LCSW, editor of the Psychotherapy Networker states, “ John Elliott is that rare combination of an intelligent, philosophical, humorous and empathic therapist…a paragon of paradox, an idol of irony and a hunter of the heart.” Barry Duncan, PhD, founder of the Institute for the Study of Therapeutic Change states, “John Elliott inspires us with his lyrical prose to not only challenge our most cherished beliefs but also attain that most sought after but rarely achieved harmony in our lives.”

Directions in Life for the Occasionally Confused, John F. Elliott
Those searching for a self help book that's less of a strict guide and more of a philosophical approach to personal improvement will find Elliott's style refreshing. The author translates 30 years of experience as a psychotherapist into simple suggestions and metaphoric yarns, each pointing the reader toward a greater understanding of self, relationships, faith, and trust. Also included are questionnaires intended to coax readers into making honest assessments about their own mores and identity.
-RICHARD RYS

Review Amazon.Com
Directions in Life for the Occasionally Confused, John F. Elliott, Publish America, $19.95.
Hidden in the paradoxes, parables, poetry and puns, among the conventional and unconventional, the intentional and the intestinal, the amusing and the profound, waits a Zen master whose unexpected and perfectly timed blow brings a flood of light.
I had been struggling in my marriage, in therapies, personal and marital. I enjoyed reading this book. It was entertaining, engrossing, accessible yet challenging. I believe the chapters that grabbed me and shook me awake helped me reach my partner after a long period of being locked out from one another's love.
There's so much wisdom and intelligent insight here, delivered often like a song a friend wrote. You know some of the verses were just made for you. And I believe I'll be revisiting this book and finding new chapters that deliver the old zen punch of fresh awakening.
I heartily recommend it.
-Leah Sullivan


Talking Cure.com and the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists
Book Review Two

Directions in Life for the Occasionally Confused
Author: John Foster Elliot

Reviewer: Jocelyn Morris-Dryant

First, I’d like to say that we all have bouts of confusion from time to time. Sometimes we are fortunate enough to squeeze out some sort of explanation for our confusion and sometimes we’re not. This book is for those of us who are tired of rationalizing on our own, anymore. Let someone else do the work for a change!

This skillful piece of work slowly pulls the reader into his/her own “life” as only he/she knows it to be. The author discussed what we couldn’t or dared to share with another. It includes explicit language which makes for brutal but comedic honesty for the adult reader in/for real life. The author exposes himself and the rest of us in just 197 pages. He shares his own psychopathology and rules of life in hopes to normalize life’s confusion. He also shares some of his sessions with the reader only to point out his own learning. I often had to stop reading to take a few moments to ponder a philosophical note or chapter only to realize my “self”. I had related. The passages or philosophies shared by the author may serve as desert in a breakthrough session with a difficult client.

This book also includes thought provoking exercises in question form to foster personal growth. Its creativity changes your perception of the world, the people in it and you, for that matter. I was really impressed by the author’s ability to distinctly explain, then clear-up, the most confusing aspects of life. He talks about how the very things in life that helped to create us are not cherished, but despised. More importantly, he carefully guides the reader to self-care and forgiveness with cooperation. He gives direction to diminish the confusion and prevent it from happening again.

The author doesn’t leave you wondering, questioning or asking for more. He covers his bases from A to Z, beginning to end, with a guideline to meditation. I finished the book feeling light and fluffy and remembered this passage “There is a reason for peak experiences and getting your feet back on the ground”.


BIOGRAPHY
John Foster Elliott began his career in psychology at age twenty-one, founding the first crisis intervention and drug-counseling center at Pennsylvania State University. He worked with Dr Steven Danish and others in utilizing Rogerian techniques for paraprofessionals and presented his first paper for the APA at age 22. John graduated cum laude in 1974, receiving the Eric Walker Award for “the most outstanding character, leadership and citizenship” among the senior graduating class. He went on to Los Angeles and established several other non-profit mental health programs for the poor and disadvantaged. Both the Los Angeles City Council and the California State Assembly officially commended John for his work in the field of substance abuse. He also studied Gestalt and NeoReichian therapy for five years with Eric Marcus, MD, one of the founders of the Gestalt Institute of Los Angeles. His other clinical interests included the study of unconscious imagery, metaphor and Ericsonian hypnotherapy. He has taken a recent interest in collaborative therapy and has written a piece for Barry Duncan in Heroic Clients, Heroic Agencies, a manual for client-directed outcome informed therapy.
John received his Master’s degree in Clinical Psychology in 1981 at International College and was licensed by the State of California as a Marriage and Family Therapist in 1982.
He has been a consultant for government and private agencies across the country, including:
the National Free Clinic Council, Los Angeles County Health Dept, Lutheran Social Services, LEAA, California BBSE Orals Commission, LAPD, LA Drug Abuse Task Force, Impact House, CRI-Help, Pasadena HS Peer Counseling, Old Time Steelworkers Fund, Project Heavy, the California State Assembly and a variety of film production companies in Hollywood.
In his spare time John practices meditation, is a performing singer-songwriter and a writer. He is currently at work with Titan Studios in Sherman Oaks, Ca. John’s book “Directions in Life for the Occasionally Confused” was released through PublishAmerica in Nov of 2004.
He has been happily married 23 years to his wife Beth, a classical musician.
And yes, -they make beautiful music together.

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