Jon James Is Dead | Vairagya

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
Depeche Mode Peter Gabriel Yello

More Artists From
United States - Minnesota

Other Genres You Will Love
Electronic: Techno Rock: Experimental Rock Moods: Instrumental
Sell your music everywhere
There are no items in your wishlist.

Vairagya

by Jon James Is Dead

When a quixotic rock-n-roll guitar player lays his tender fingers on some woozy loops and seasick beats, this accidental brainchild gets conjured. Two parts sheer exuberance, one part pure evil.
Genre: Electronic: Techno
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Continue Shopping
available for download only
Share to Google +1

To listen to tracks you will need to update your browser to a recent version.

  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. So Good
Jon James Is Dead
3:30 $0.99
clip
2. Jackboots
Jon James Is Dead
3:50 $0.99
clip
3. Derailleur
Jon James Is Dead
3:12 $0.99
clip
4. Arjuna, In the Rough
Jon James Is Dead
3:37 $0.99
clip
5. What's in the Box?
Jon James Is Dead
5:01 $0.99
clip
6. Yang Rising
Jon James Is Dead
4:29 $0.99
clip
7. Liquorice
Jon James Is Dead
3:12 $0.99
clip
8. Take One
Jon James Is Dead
3:25 $0.99
clip
9. Transfiguration
Jon James Is Dead
4:35 $0.99
clip
10. Frostbitten
Jon James Is Dead — feat. DJ Kiiyote
3:44 $0.99
clip
11. Pincushion
Jon James Is Dead
3:37 $0.99
clip
12. Legal Tender
Jon James Is Dead
3:27 $0.99
clip
13. Wild Turkey (Shot in the Spleen)
Jon James Is Dead
3:26 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
J. J. Benson is a Minneapolis guitar player and singer-songwriter whose material has been compared to everything from Ryan Adams to Todd Rundgren, Bob Dylan to Francis Dunnery. He's heavily influenced by Brit Invasion, Glam and Power Pop. Benson has also played sideman (guitar/bass) to dozens of luminaries in the Twin Cities area.

Vairagya is his first venture into 100% electronic music. "I started out playing with loops just to see where it would take me," said Benson. "I found those loops were like planting little seeds. Ideas would spring from them; I'd return the next day and work a little more -- suddenly I'd have these fully-fleshed songs. Soon thereafter, an entire album's worth. It was really joyful to see how things developed from almost nothing into something relatively complex, just by virtue of continuing to 'show up' and see where the process took me."

Benson cites having very little experience with, or exposure to, electronic music. “It’s not something I’ve ever really paid much attention to, so it’s tough to offer reference points for these songs. Loops are repetitive by nature, and though I understand the trance-like appeal, it’s something I tend to get bored with rather quickly. I found myself manipulating a lot of things to create progressions, changes, melodies and arrangements more akin to pop-rock songwriting, but in the instrumental-only vein.”

“Personally, I hear traces of certain influences from my childhood – anything from Depeche Mode to Peter Gabriel to Yello. The last track (Wild Turkey) almost reminds me of something by The Band.” All the songs are heavily layered and stray from any semblance of minimalism. “I read somewhere once how (songwriter) Dan Wilson once said the ear can’t pick up on more than 2 or 3 melodic figures in a song and that anything else would confuse a listener. I thought to myself, well what about symphonies? There’s all sorts of stuff going on there; point, counterpoint galore. The appeal of that, I think, is it allows one to get a bit ‘lost’ in an oceanic feeling of sorts. That’s the feeling a lot of these songs evoke for me. Not having much background with this medium really allowed me to embrace a ‘beginner’s mind’ mentality and construct whatever I wanted from the ground up; allow the muse to take me wherever it took me. It was tremendously fun and liberating to just throw whatever at the wall and see what stuck.”

Read more...

Reviews


to write a review

You Can't Tuna Fish

Vairagya Is A Fantastic Electronica Joyride
Vairagya is a refreshing and well orchestrated soiree of electronic splendor. While a wholly unique and daring sidestep from his usual fare, and this being his maiden odyssey into the genre, J.J. Benson brings an astute and a well seasoned understanding to the medium. The album opens up “full throttle” with high energy, then quickly settles into a “night on the town, cruising the city and checking out the clubs” vibe. Variety is quite prevalent. From the upbeat and melodic “So Good”, to the dank and dirty groove of “Derailleur”, the beats and melodies will both delight and haunt you. Then this fabulous journey settles into the “comfy chair” with interspersed chill gems such as “What’s In The Box”, “Transfiguration”, and “Pincushion”. The collection bookends on a positive high-note-pick-me-up with “Wild Turkey (Shot In The Spleen)”.

In a market which seems to exponentially believe more is better, Vairagya stands ingeniously firm on the line of just enough vs. too much with a clean, well balanced array of electronic music. Showing true songwriting prowess, Mr. Benson successfully demonstrates a gift for crossing musical genre boundaries and delivers a very admiringly beautiful album. I have no issues with giving this 5 stars. It’s quickly becoming one of my favorites.
Read more...