Joshua Riley | Promenade Du Piano

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United States - Kentucky

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Classical: Piano solo Classical: Piano solo Moods: Solo Instrumental
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Promenade Du Piano

by Joshua Riley

Gentle, yet fiery and refined performances of well-known piano classics, including the works of Beethoven, Chopin, Mozart, Debussy and others.
Genre: Classical: Piano solo
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Arabesque No. 1 in E Major: Andantino Con Moto
4:10 $0.99
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2. "Claire De Lune" (from Suite Bergamasque): Andante
4:40 $0.99
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3. Nocturne No. 1 in B-Flat Minor, Op. 9: Larghetto
5:02 $0.99
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4. Valse No. 2 in C-Sharp Minor, Op. 64: Tempo Giusto
3:59 $0.99
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5. Sonatina No. 6 in D Major, Op. 36: Allegro Con Spirito
5:04 $0.99
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6. Nocturne No. 20 in C-Sharp Minor, Op. Post.: Lento Con Gran Espressione
3:42 $0.99
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7. Prelude No. 6 "Tolling Bells" in B Minor, Op. 28: Assai Lento
1:49 $0.99
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8. Prelude No. 2 in C-Sharp Minor, Op. 3: Lento
3:42 $0.99
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9. Fantasia No. 3 in D Minor, K. 397: Andante
4:39 $0.99
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10. The Firefly: Allegro
1:06 $0.99
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11. Fountain in the Rain: Gently Flowing
1:34 $0.99
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12. Bagatelle No. 25 "Für Elise" in a Minor, WoO. 59: Poco Moto
2:43 $0.99
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13. Sonata No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 10: I. Allegro Molto E Con Brio
5:44 $0.99
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14. Valse No. 1 "Minute Waltz" in D-Flat Major, Op. 64: Molto Vivace
1:53 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
I began recording "Promenade du Piano" (2012) in 2010 in Evansville, while I was working full-time and wanted a way to put my work into other people's hands to enjoy. I knew I could record high-quality audio and put together a few pieces that most audiences would enjoy (requests typically made while out performing). This prompted me to select a series of titles that would eventually be included on my first album; a short while later, I began the recording process.

Who has really thought about all of the hard work that goes into recording music? I certainly didn't before I started. Listening to a lot of different kinds of music and having an appreciation for the quality of the performance is easy, but how often do you really listen explicity? How often do you pay close attention to what you are hearing, letting the sound of each individual phrase wash over you like a metaphorical rain? As I began recording, there were so many opportunities for new ways to make the pieces I had performed more accurate and true to the composer's original ideas that I found it quite overwhelming. Citing a close friend of my mother, "You're hearing; but, are you listening?" This very question became the cornerstone of my future recordings.

So it began. I sent my first "track", which was a terse, sans-sostenuto rendition of Chopin's Scherzo in B Minor (albeit I would later come to know this piece as "the knuckle-cracker", for a very good reason), to my parents. They were ecstatic, and thus, the desire to continue recording more pieces and truly delve into my talents for a listening ear began. I started recording different kinds of harmonies and sounds - I even created introductory audio files for web designs I was working on for clients! At first, it came easily. I was still adjusting my ear to hear the details of each recording. But as time wore on, I realized that most of the pieces I wanted to record would have to be performed hundreds of times before I would satisfy my careful ear's desire for near-perfect performances. Although I was never able to achieve this status, I can honestly say that I've done my very best to come as close as I physically (and mentally) am able. Now, a little about me:

Joshua Riley (b. 1986) began his musical career at the young age of eight, studying piano under Sarah Capehart at Oakland City University. He has since studied with many respected teachers and professors, including Sandra Botkin, retired Professor of Piano at the University of Evansville, Red Wick of the Red Wick Piano Trio, and Dr. Karen Taylor, Professor of Piano at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music. Riley has performed all over the state of Indiana, encountering a wide array of audiences. He has performed on a number of occasions at the Oakland City University Cornwell Reed Fine Arts Center, and recently accompanied the Flanner House Youth Chorale at the Madame Walker Theatre Center in Indianapolis. Riley has received many awards for his performances, including first place in the I.M.T.A., I.S.S.M.A., and K.E.Y. student competitions, and a scholarship for performing at the Schmidt Piano Competition in Evansville.

Riley graduated from Wood Memorial High School in May 2005. After briefly studying piano performance and computer science at Indiana University in Bloomington, he returned to his home in Francisco, IN, where he spent most of his time practicing piano for performances and developing online content for various individuals. Riley has created web sites for such prestigious musicians as Dr. Marian Harrison and Professor Edward Auer of Indiana University. He enjoys working with clients interested in music like himself, and strives to become a better pianist and web designer with each new project.

Currently, Riley lives in Louisville, KY, where he works out of his home developing web content and recording for upcoming albums. Riley was recently seen performing for the Wayward Actors production of "Reefer Madness" at the Kentucky Center for the Arts, and loves to volunteer his spare time to help with music-related endeavors.

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