J.T. Perkins | Fiddle Favorites (Perkins Style)

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Folk: Appalachian Folk Country: Bluegrass Moods: Mood: Upbeat
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Fiddle Favorites (Perkins Style)

by J.T. Perkins

FIDDLIN’ FAVORITES: LIKE YOU NEVER HEARD ‘EM BEFORE kind of describes a jazz-like musical approach to classic fiddlegrass. J.T. Perkins is a fine crafts man on the fiddle and has even had a style of fiddling named after him, "Perkins Style."
Genre: Folk: Appalachian Folk
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  Song Share Time Download
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1. High Country
3:13 $0.99
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2. Twinkle Little Star
2:36 $0.99
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3. Forty Years Ago Waltz
3:11 $0.99
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4. Home Brew Rag
2:31 $0.99
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5. Durang's Hornpipe
2:59 $0.99
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6. Leather Britches
2:34 $0.99
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7. Sally Goodin
3:24 $0.99
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8. Wednesday Night Waltz
3:04 $0.99
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9. Dusty Miller
2:55 $0.99
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10. Bill Cheatum
2:51 $0.99
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11. Doc Harris Hornpipe
1:49 $0.99
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12. Blackberry Blossom
2:12 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
J.T. PERKINS AND THE DAWNING OF THE PROGRESSIVE ERA IN AMERICAN OLD TIME FIDDLING

One year at Weiser, Idaho, someone remarked that modern fiddling was very much like Progressive Jazz. We were listening to Benny Thomasson and Roy Lee Cowan and they had been jamming non-stop for a half hour. No one remembered what they were even playing any more. If you didn’t catch the beginning, you would never know – but it was totally absorbing, high-energy music, and when the theme finally returned - - “I Don’t Love Nobody” - - it was like the consumation of a jazz performance. Everyone applauded.

It is a long way from modern jazz to modern fiddling, but it may not be so far-fetched to imagine the dawning of a ‘progressive’ era in fiddle music. The old-time fiddlers created a firm foundation for the basic feeling of the music. But with the influence of Western Swing, Bluegrass, the competitive ‘flashy’styles of the fiddling contests - - and also the real demise of fiddling in its original function as dance music - - we are beginning to see many new directions arising. Already the fiddle has established itself in modern jazz with such great artists as Stephanie, Jean-Luc-Ponty and the avant-garde Michael White. We are also seeing an interesting blend of fiddlers more grounded in the country tradition, but explorers on the fringe of modern jazz - - fiddlers like Johnny Gimble or Vassar Clements, for example. In the contest world, the most conservative of all fiddling worlds - - even there, the influence of decidely modern ideas has been pronounced for some time. One thinks of Benny Thomasson and Major Franklin and Howdy Forrester, all solid country fiddlers with their feet in the ground of tradition, but their ears tuned to the winds of change.

Out of the generation that produced artists like Benny Thomasson, we are now getting a second, even third generation of ‘modern’ old-time fiddler: Dick Barrett of Texas, 15 year old Mark O’Connor from Washington State, and J.T. Perkins from Alabama, to name a few. This new style or approach is often inaccurately called the Texas Style, but the fact that these three fiddlers are from widely scattered regions means that this term really does not serve. Emerging from Texas in the beginning, this style is often synonymous with contests all over the United States and - - for better or worse - - it could simply be called the contest style.

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