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Juan Pólito Baxin | Guitarra de Son

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Latin: Latin Folk Latin: Sonero Moods: Solo Instrumental
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Guitarra de Son

by Juan Pólito Baxin

This legendary musician from San Andrés Tuxtla, Veracruz, Mexico was 90 when he recorded this instrumental collection of some rarely heard sones jarochos played on the media guitarra. An essential tool for anyone learning to play guitarra de son.
Genre: Latin: Latin Folk
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  Song Share Time Download
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1. El Aguanieve
2:01 $0.99
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2. El Ahualulco
2:08 $0.99
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3. La Bamba
2:03 $0.99
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4. El Borracho
2:00 $0.99
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5. La Bruja
2:01 $0.99
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6. El Buscapies
1:57 $0.99
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7. El Butaquito
2:42 $0.99
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8. El Canelo
1:56 $0.99
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9. El Capotin
1:51 $0.99
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10. El Cascabel
3:00 $0.99
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11. El Conejo
2:02 $0.99
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12. El Cupido
2:08 $0.99
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13. El Andanguito
2:00 $0.99
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14. El Fandanguito-Descante
0:38 $0.99
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15. La Guacamaya
2:47 $0.99
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16. El Huerfanito
2:26 $0.99
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17. La India
2:04 $0.99
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18. El Jarabe
2:01 $0.99
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19. La Maria Cirila
1:08 $0.99
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20. La Morena
2:57 $0.99
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21. El Pajaro Carpintero
1:26 $0.99
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22. El Pajaro Cu
2:01 $0.99
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23. El Palomo
1:34 $0.99
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24. La Petenera
2:10 $0.99
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25. El Presidente
1:59 $0.99
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26. El Sapo
2:00 $0.99
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27. El Siquisiri
2:58 $0.99
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28. El Siquisiri Viejo
1:37 $0.99
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29. El Torero
2:04 $0.99
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30. El Toro
2:59 $0.99
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31. El Trompo
2:04 $0.99
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32. El Zapateado
2:54 $0.99
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33. El Zopilote
1:09 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
This is the fifth CD released by Anona Music, of field recordings made by Alec Dempster in Santiago Tuxtla and San Andrés Tuxtla in the state of Veracruz, Mexico.

This is also the first CD in a new series which focuses on important musicians playing the guitarra de son without accompaniment.


Juan Pólito Baxin, is one of the oldest and most notable Son Jarocho musicians from the Tuxtlas region in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. He has conserved a unique way of playing sones, which is slower than in other parts of the Sotavento region. It is also important to note that Juan plays a series of sones, which are in disuse such as El Zopilote, El Capotín, El Huerfanito and El Torero. He is also the only musician of his generation who plays the media guitarra. He is also recognized for having shared his knowledge with new generations of jaraneros, assuring the continuity of the oral tradition. This occurred with a group of young enthusiasts who gathered in the Casa de la Cultura of San Andrés Tuxtla and who subsequently formed a group called “Los Cultivadores del Son”. Together with this group Juan Pólito and his cousin Juan Mixtega Baxin recorded a cassette in 1998, which is currently out of print.

The recordings included on this CD where made on the 18th and 19th of August, 2003, in San Andrés Tuxtla at the musician’s home. Andrés Moreno, the director of the “Casa de la Cultura” and member of “Los Cultivadores”, was concerned with documenting Juan Pólito´s playing, and suggested we make this recording. Juan Mixtega had passed away a few years back and it had not been possible to make a recording to remember him by.

The format of this recording is not common because a musician is featured interpreting 33 sones with no accompaniment. This was a necessary decision for several reasons. First of all, it is a document, which conserves an important part of the musical heritage of Mexico being that no other musician plays the “media guitar de son” the way he does with such a personal style. The repertoire presented here includes familiar sones such as La Bamba as well as others, mentioned above, which have been neglected. This material also serves as a learning tool for new generations of musicians in the area and others in larger cities who are far away from the rural origins of this music. The uniqueness of this format does not by any means detract from its listening appeal. On the contrary, this is an excellent opportunity to perceive many of the nuances, which are lost in the tumult of the fandango.

We know a bit about how Juan Pólito started playing and his fascinating life thanks to his excellent memory and charming storytelling. He was born in 1917 and became interested in Son Jarocho more than eighty years ago. His exposure to the music was inevitable because fandangos were organized regularly near his house. As a young child he probably listened to the fandangos on Saturday nights from his bed and eventually he began to venture out to the fandangos without his parent’s consent. Somehow he managed to hide behind a rock and begin learning as he watched the musicians and dancers.

At the time Son Jarocho was the only festive music played in the rural communities of the Tuxtlas region and the fandango was the main pastime of local farmers. That was the case in La Joya as well as other communities such as Texcaltitan, Tilapan, Apixita and Benito Júarez to name just a few, where there are still a handful of elder musicians. The municipality of San Andrés is home to a wealth of talented and mostly unrecognized musicians like Juan Pólito who come from families who have played son jarocho for several generations. Unfortunately many have disappeared or stopped playing.

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