Keith Morris & the Crooked Numbers | The Dirty Gospel

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Rock: Americana Blues: Blues Gospel Moods: Type: Lyrical
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The Dirty Gospel

by Keith Morris & the Crooked Numbers

"The entire album is a solid soul flogging from beginning to end. If you like your Tom Waits more groovy, if you like your Dylan less obtuse & if you like your Tom Petty without Jeff-fucking-Lynne, this is the record for you."
Genre: Rock: Americana
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Psychopaths & Sycophants
3:57 $0.99
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2. Issues (Raising Cain)
4:48 $0.99
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3. Pale Moon
3:49 $0.99
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4. Dopesick Blues
3:31 $0.99
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5. Prejudiced and Blind
4:58 $0.99
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6. Devil's Stew
5:43 $0.99
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7. Are You Free Now?
4:04 $0.99
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8. Brownsville Market
4:46 $0.99
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9. Chipper Jones
5:28 $0.99
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10. Johnny Gilmore
3:45 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Keith Morris & Company are back with another installation of their rock and gospel-oriented Americana. There’s hell-and-hallelujahs and swamp rock grit all over this puppy. While the March-break College kids are puking in the back alleys of the French Quarter in Nawlins during Mardi Gras, Keith & Co. are holding court in the backrooms of some smoke and whiskey drenched speakeasy between Bourbon and Royal Streets laying down the 10 Commandments of Hard Luck Town. It’s difficult focusing on specific tracks because the entire album is a solid soul flogging from beginning to end. If you like your Tom Waits more groovy, if you like your Dylan less obtuse and if you like your Tom Petty without Jeff-fucking-Lynne, this is the record for you. Stand out tracks are the almost Henley-like cynical bite of “Psychopaths & Sycophants”, the “Rockin’ In The Free World” melodic drive of “Prejudiced and Blind” and the ascendant artistry of ballads like “Devil’s Stew” and “Chipper Jones”.
-Jaimie Vernon, https://bobsegarini.wordpress.com/2015/11/07/jaimie-vernon-american-singers-american-legends-bop-bop-bop/

Keith Morris is back, and his sound's a good deal bigger this time, right from the first cut's kick-in ("Psychopaths & Sycophants"), much mindful of the Move's "Feel Too Good", Manfred Mann's take on Dylan's "Get Your Rocks Off", and Happy Monday's rave-up on John Kongos' "Tokoloshe Man" (if'n yew, pilgrim, ain't heard them thar brain-burning toonz, then yer waaaay behind!), pregnant with a groove so insistent it puts a new unholy lurch in the brontosaurus stomp.

That doesn't mean he's lost an ounce of that Lawsiana back porch soul, though, as "Pale Moon Rising" well evidences. The titles alone tell ya whatcher in fer: "Dopesick Blues", "Prejudiced & Blind", "Devil's Stew", etc., a potpourri of Woodstock Nation cynicism, cheek, 'n down and dirty honesty. Then there's the righteously wailing choir quartet and tear-the-frets off musicians, who do their damned level best to put the stink on the stank on the stunk, wallowing in gutbucket rock 'n roll that'll have ya starry-eyed and yellin'. Yep, 'rock' is most assuredly a lapidarian term and thus fits this rough 'n cool bitchin' lil' ol' gem to a 'T'. Have a fifth of something potent to hand when you tear the shrink-wrap off and toss the disc in the player.
-Mark S. Tucker, former reviewer for FAME

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Reviews


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Amanda P.

At firs listen, "The Dirty Gospel..."
At first listen, “The Dirty Gospel,” hits all the high notes – all ten songs are sonically vibrant and skillfully
played by Keith's always-impressive lineup of stellar musicians. One could hardly ask for a better sounding record. The second listen, though, and all the others (and there will be many others), makes the “The Dirty Gospel” live up to its name. Keith Morris is a master of theme, and now you're in his world.
“Psychopaths and Sycophants”, the first song on the record, comes bursting in full-force, and by the time you've gotten through the darkly contemplative and artfully unresolved , “Issues,” you may be starting to wonder if the characters that populate Morris's “Gospel” are friends or enemies. Even though Morris localizes several of his songs (“Brownsville Market,” “Johnny Gilmore”) squarely in his Virginia town, don't be fooled. As the record unfolds, you start to realize that Morris's charmingly twisted, irredeemably troubled, and all-too real characters ARE your friends and enemies – and your family. Yourself.
If you've got anything left, you'll listen again to mull it all over. You'll listen again because it sounds so damn good.
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Dwight McNeill

Amen brothers and sisters
The word “gospel” comes from the ancient Greek words meaning “good message” or “good news”. Keith Morris’ Dirty Gospel is all of that and a whole lot more. It’s alive and in your face with a mess of stuff most polite folk keep to themselves. Bless their hearts. “Psychopaths & Sycophants” hits you right out of the gate like a churning magma cocktail -with a sugar rim thanks mainly to the heavenly Choir. “Issues” (don’t we all have issues?) sounds like an Old Testament absinthe dream. Angels greet the “Pale Moon” as it rises and I abandon reservation as I myself rise and reach to turn up the volume, roll the car windows down and affirm life on Earth. “Dopesick Blues” is an Oxycontin cakewalk while I hunker down for my favorite epistle “Prejudiced & Blind” which snarls and soars. “Devil’s Stew” satisfies me just fine. It’s musically tasty and fortified with the CD’s darkest and best lyrics. I can’t get Cab Galloway out of my head as the Crooked Numbers chant the chorus, “hey, hey, hey”. “Are You Free Now?” successfully seeks redemption and as I close my eyes, I swear I feel warm hands rest on my shoulders. “Brownsville Market”, “Chipper Jones” and “Johnny Gilmore” are independently worthy of their own EP but round out the Dirty Gospel here, proof positive of an excellent life ever after. Amen brothers and sisters, I love this CD and, God as my witness, you will too.
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Onlooker

Anger you can get behind
The cover of Keith Morris’s new album shows him in front of a beat-up storefront—hands in pockets, doing a “you looking at me?” down the street, the title of the album scrawled across the plywood behind him. Is he about to hit you up for money, to preach at you, just to walk disgustedly back into some apartment he’s squatting in? It strikes me as just right for ten songs that leave you unsure what you want to do first—tap your foot, start a revolution, or take a shower.

Morris has a thing or two to say about all kinds of cultural dirt here: history infested with dictators and celebrities, ominous signs in the sky, addiction, greed, institutionalized hypocrisy, prejudice . . . Luckily, he serves up his sermon with high energy and wry humor, and it comes at you with a good-natured swagger, thanks to a companionable mix of in-your-face guitars, smiling background vocals, and dare-you-not-to-move drums. Both angry and engaging, this is a record that howls a lot, yeah, but also makes you feel like howling along.
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Amanda

"The Dirty Gospel"
At first listen, “The Dirty Gospel,” hits all the high notes – all ten songs are sonically vibrant and skillfully played by Keith's always-impressive lineup of stellar musicians. One could hardly ask for a better sounding record. The second listen, though, and all the others (and there will be many others), makes the “The Dirty Gospel” live up to its name. Keith Morris is a master of theme, and now you're in his world.
“Psychopaths and Sycophants”, the first song on the record, comes bursting in full-force, and by the time you've gotten through the darkly contemplative and artfully unresolved , “Issues,” you may be starting to wonder if the characters that populate Morris's “Gospel” are friends or enemies. Even though Morris localizes several of his songs (“Brownsville Market,” “Johnny Gilmore”) squarely in his Virginia town, don't be fooled. As the record unfolds, you start to realize that Morris's charmingly twisted, irredeemably troubled, and all-too real characters ARE your friends and enemies – and your family. Yourself.
If you've got anything left, you'll listen again to mull it all over. You'll listen again because it sounds so damn good.
Read more...

Jeff Roberts

Classic Americana
Comparisons to Bob Dylan and Tom Petty immediately come to mind both for the raspy, world wise vocals and the broad range of themes from gothic Americana to joyful Gospel. But neither of these two had the benefit of lovely sisters Davina & Davita Jackson, the singers who croon & wail behind Morris like two lovely sirens of harmony. This album benefits from a skillful production that brings a gritty shine to the vocals and highlights a tight rhythm section and guitars. This is top notch Americana that holds its own with any album in the genre and demands a place in the canon.
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Joe Pollock

Dirty Swamp rock at it's finest
What a powerhouse of a record! This record pairs well with flying down the 10 through New Orleans on a hot day. The sound of the guitars, the drums, the backup singers are all so strong and in your face, but polite enough to let everyone get their due. No one thing overpowers this record, but without each individual element, nothing would make sense. The topics explored in the songs are deep and meaningful and sometimes expressed with a Dylan-esque ambiguity. A song like "Chipper Jones", in the span of a few minutes is humorous and and heartbreaking. It's a consistently beautiful record, the guitars often crunch like the gears of a getaway car, and the drums instantly surround you as if to say, you ain't getting out of here alive, but the beauty is always there. This would be a hard album for anyone to top, Keith has his work cut out for him.
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