Leigh Sloggett | More Than I Need

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AUSTRALIA - Victoria

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Blues: Folk-Blues Folk: Modern Folk Moods: Type: Acoustic
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More Than I Need

by Leigh Sloggett

Acoustic folk-blues crossover with husk tinged vocals, haunting slide guitar and rich emotive songs.
Genre: Blues: Folk-Blues
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Feeling Good Today
2:56 $0.99
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2. Dog Line
4:11 $0.99
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3. Dancing With Joy
2:21 $0.99
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4. Deep Dark Water
3:50 $0.99
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5. Moer Than I Need
3:33 $0.99
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6. Sweet Serene
3:42 $0.99
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7. Pleased to Meet You
2:09 $0.99
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8. I Am a Lonesome Hobo
3:21 album only
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9. Setting Out
2:43 $0.99
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10. The Sea
4:42 $0.99
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11. No Room At the Top
2:50 $0.99
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12. I Can Fly
2:32 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
‘A perfect blend of folk and blues’ is how one reviewer described Leigh Sloggett’s
2008 release, ‘Looking For the Clues’. Continuing in this genre Leigh now has a brand new album titled, 'More Than I Need'.

Produced by internationally acclaimed finger-style guitarist Nick Charles and recorded at Atlantis Sound (Melbourne, Australia), 'More Than I Need' represents a pinnacle in Leigh's recording career and brings stylistic maturation to his music.

'More Than I Need' follows on from Leigh's two previous albums, 'Looking For the Clues' in 2008 and 'Sliding to Your Destiny' in 2006. This time around he was joined in the studio by a range of Melbourne’s finest musicians consisting of Les Oldman (drums and percussion), Louis Gill (double bass), Matthew Arnold (violin), Alex Burns (harmonica) and Lisa Baird from 'Lily and King' (backing vocals). Nick Charles plays second guitar (acoustic, electric and resonator) on many tracks as well as mandolin and six string banjo. The songs cover a range of moods from the lively opening track, 'Feeling Good Today' and instrumental 'Dancing with Joy' to more introspective pieces like 'Deep Dark Water' and 'The Sea' and at time crosses into an almost ambient feel with the instrumentals, 'Setting Out' and 'I Can Fly'. The songs draw on a wide range of subjects from the Dog Line at Eaglehawk Neck in Tasmania, Australia and greed in contemporary society to a daughter's loss of her father's affection. As always with Leigh's albums there is no shortage of lap-slide guitar and for the first time Leigh has included a cover song - Bob Dylan's, 'I Am a Lonesome Hobo'.

A review written for the Folk & Acoustic Music Exchange
by Mark S. Tucker
It's been four years since Leigh Sloggett's 2008 Looking for the Clues (here), and that's much too long a wait, though when you hear More than I Need, regrets and wistfulness will quickly fade. The interval has seen the composer sink more deeply into his flawless interpolation of folk and blues—in fact, this release places him much more clearly in line with the Canadian maestros (Colin Linden, Ian Tyson, Steve Dawson, etc.). That evolved trait becomes searingly evident in the instrumental Dancing with Joy, a track the Takoma and CandyRat labels would've been very happy to have had appear in their esteemed domains.
As with the last CD, Sloggett likes to gently back into John Martyn territory, which he incorporates into More than I Need, my favorite cut this time out. As always, the lyrics to each song hold a good deal more than the semantics seem to make plain, especially in Dog Line, a harkening back to elder days, heartless laws, and "justice" with a tragic ending resolving into transcendent determination. Sloggett chose acclaimed finger-style guitarist Nick Charles to produce the disc, and the harmony between the two couldn't be more copacetic, fleshing each cut with a spare lucidity dimensionalizing the rustic atmospherics native to his opuses.
In fact, the take on Dylan's I am a Lonesome Hobo injects a laser-edged brio the original doesn't have: where Dylan was regaling the listener through a documentarian's ilk of narration, Leigh sings from the mendicant's backbone with grit, regret, and prophetic admonition. The Sea, however, reaches into the composer's Nick Drake/Iain Matthews wont, here with a bit of Mike Scott and the Waterboys, and those are guys one can never get enough of. Now they have a fourth set of hands. No Room at the Top, on the other hand, could almost have been a cut from the Performance soundtrack containing Jagger's outrageously righteous Memo from Turner, and the closing I Can Fly is as perfect a closing instrumental lullabye as you're likely to find anywhere, poignant and almost wrenching, were it not also sweet and decorous, a very fine line drawn between the two estates, a bittersweet cut very much underlining much of More than I Need's and Leigh Sloggett's sense of Humanistic realism.

Review by Taylor McVean – Pearl Magazine (www.pearlmag.com.au)
More Than I Need - Leigh Sloggett
Melbourne based artist Leigh Sloggett’s latest offering, ‘More Than I Need’, hits all the right notes as a contemporary folk-blues album. Track one, ‘Feeling Good Today,’ warms the ears daring to drift into the pop -folk playing field while track two, ‘Dog Line’, by far the stand out track, takes the listener on a haunting story-telling journey. What I enjoyed most about the album was Leigh’s willingness to accompany the music with his vocal, rather than dominate it, evident in the CD’s three instrumental only tracks. My only wish is given there are only 12 relatively short songs, carrying the instrumental element through from track to track would have prolonged my “Sloggett Experience”. At times I was just warming into a song only to find it finish.‘More Than I Need’ is a must have for anyone seeking easy listening, grab the album for your next road-trip, you’ll be arriving at your destination before you know it.

Album Review by Trevor Shard -Australian Songwriters Association VICTORIAN REGIONAL CO-ORDINATOR
“More Than I Need” -Leigh Sloggett
“I woke up this morning feeling good today/the suns in the sky and the rain’s gone away”
On Leigh Sloggett’s third album, “More Than I Need”, we find him at peace and content with the
world.
The opening track “Feeling Good Today” sets the scene. What follows is a generous serve of roots
and blues influenced songs and instrumentals. The hero of the dish is the clean line of Leigh’s slide
guitar, front and centre throughout the album.
We can hear the dedication of the man to his trade. In his other life, Leigh is a fine craftsman of
Netsuke, a traditional Japanese form of sculpture. You can see the attention to detail mirrored in his
music.
Leigh has the sound of the earth in his voice and a velvet touch in his fingers. He follows simple song
structures in traditional formats but with a few little twists along the way to catch you by surprise.
He covers a range of subjects.
There is some early Australian history with the convict sent down to Tasmania for stealing a loaf of
bread who yearns to cross “The Dog Line” – the thin stretch of land between the penal colony at
Port Arthur and the mainland of Tasmania.
“Deep Dark Water” deals with relationship problems – “Only fools fight their friends/but some lovers
like to fight it out”
A return to the meaning of life in “More Than I Need” – “simple food and a scratch of friends …”.
The album has an unprocessed feel, a distinct departure from the digital wall of sound we hear so
often on the radio. The instruments are allowed to shine and there is a seamless melding of guitars
and rhythm section.
The CD was produced by “go-to” guy Nick Charles, who is making a name for himself as a producer
of Melbourne based singer song-writers. Nick also contributes articles to Rhythms, Trad and Now
and Cornstalk magazines.
A great piece of work deserving of repeated listenings.

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