Luluk Purwanto & the Helsdingen Trio | The Walz

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Jazz: Progressive Jazz Jazz: Chamber Jazz Moods: Type: Lyrical
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The Walz

by Luluk Purwanto & the Helsdingen Trio

A fusion of Classical and Jazz. There are so many moods in the music itself, even within one piece.. You would like to come in and participate and know what's going on. Direct, simple, courages and very different
Genre: Jazz: Progressive Jazz
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Stay with You
6:52 $0.99
clip
2. Endless (feat. Trevor Ware)
8:43 $0.99
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3. The Zoo (feat. Rene Van Helsdingen)
8:06 $0.99
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4. Song 4 (feat. Egbert Van Gruythuyzen)
6:13 $0.99
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5. The Walz
5:11 $0.99
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6. Yes I Do
4:13 $0.99
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7. Song Eleven
4:40 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
In 1988 the group: 'Luluk Purwanto & the Helsdingen Trio' featuring: Egbert Van Gruythuyzen, Trevor Ware was formed and for promotion this quartet was engaged in a TV Film / CD production: -'Live' Luluk Purwanto & the Helsdingen Trio'. (directed and produced by Theo Ordeman/ Frans Mijts and narrated by Bob James) The production was financed by Helsdingen Music BV and Licensed and marketed by Dureco (CD: 'The Walz' , Dureco 1151512 - 1989). The film was purchased in December 1989 by TV2 Danmark

Artists:
Luluk Purwanto: violin, voice
Rene van Helsdingen: pano
Trevor Ware: double bass
Egbert van Gruythuyzen: drums

Produced by Rene van Helsdingen. Recorded and mixed at the Bolland Studios, Blaricum, the Netherlands.
Engineer: Jan Schuurman. Cover photography: Camilla van Zuylen.
Egbert plays Sonor drums. All songs composed by Rene van Helsdingen and Luluk Purwanto except for "Yes I do" which was also composed by Asai Harum. Special thanks to Hampe Muziek Amsterdam, Mr. ten Have, Bose.
© Helsdingen music 1989.

14-15 September 1988: TV Film / CD production: -'Live' Luluk Purwanto & the Helsdingen Trio'. Narration: Bob James.
Producer: Frans Mijts, Director: Theo Ordeman, Production manager: Frits van der Sman, Camera: Hans Springer, Lars Hansen, Dirk de Jong, Video engineer: Charles Boot/ Hoek & Sonépouse, video mixer: Patrick van der Griend? Hoek & Sonépouse, Production assitant: Jan Uffels/ Hoek & Sonépouse, Sound engineer: Jan Schuurman, lighting: Maarten Werner, Make up: Nathalie Abbing, Make up assistant: Sigrid Mijts.

The final film was narrated by Jazz pianist Bob James:
TV Film / CD production: -'Live' Luluk Purwanto & the Helsdingen Trio'.

What you are about to see is a live performance of original music composed & arranged by Rene and Luluk. Because of the diversity of their backgrounds the music has influences that span the globe and take you forward & backward in time. Through their music you will be able to share their travels to many exotic places, Europe, China, Brazil, Indonesia, America. it’s a musical adventure that i think you will find unique.
Luluk was born in Indonesia and raised in a family where classical music was most often heard. Both of her parents are opera singers and encouraged her to pursue her classical training… she soon found, however that jazz improvisation was capturing her imagination. Rene studied the classics, but found that what he heard in his head could not be restricted. He pursued his interest in jazz , through studies in America and through listening and absorbing a wide variety of music.  The result, a collaboration that establishes new boundaries, that refuses to be categorized by anything we have heard before.

There are so many moods in the music itself, even within one piece. Ii think you’re definitely not allowed to become to passive and I don’t like to be passive with music. I don’t like to have it just sweep over me but I like to come in and participate and know what’s going on
I like to know when the next section is coming up, and I never do in your music because it does have that element of surprise.  Because you change tempo or you change time signature or you change keys I am very stimulated by the music, and broad up by it because I like to be challenged in that way, to try to keep up.

I think one of the things that attracts me to new music, more than anything else, is the element of surprise. When I hear music that I haven't heard before by people who come from the other side of the continent, I’m intrigued by how the variety of influences come into the music. It would be difficult to find a more eclectic, a more interesting mixture of musical styles then I find in this music.
Sometimes it seems classical, like listening to a sonata and sometimes it seems like it is very traditional jazz that was played in Europe. Being a jazz musician I always like the idea of bringing in other elements of different places whether it be folk music or country and western music or classical music.
I like the fact that you are both willing to be direct and simple when it feels right to you but also courageous  enough to be very different and to go down a different path when the music seems to want to go that way.
Pieces such as zoo, have very big changes in them. Almost like a patch-work, a, quilt or a collage or different little sketches that get put together and eventually make one piece. So it starts out maybe as being sometimes...two-three-.four completely different pieces and by experimenting, you find which section follow logically from one to another. The structure of the melody at the beginning is very much build around those little jumps and trills and scoop and things like that you do.
Speaking as a musician, I don’t really worry about whether people call music by a description that is helpful to them.  All improvised music is new just by the simple definition of the people who are doing it spontaneously and it’s going to be different from anything that came before it.. …. and that’s what I found modern about this group. I certainly don’t hear an attempt to duplicate older jazz styles or to recreate  music from the past.

This whole dialogue that goes on between the two of you is obviously a dialogue that is very intimate and something that comes about as a result of many many times of playing together and hearing ideas and going back and forth, which may start out with some. either awkward transitions or problems or whatever that the second person in the collaboration sais. “I have a way that can solve that and make it sound better if I do this!” And then the first person either sais: “no, I don’t like what you did, I like it better the way I did it the first time”. Or hopefully in your collaboration most of the time the other person would say: “geeei ! . . .why  didn‘t  I think of  that! ! . . . and some of this is going to sound better with my voice with it..or “this is going to sound better if I use a different style of bowing”..or “yes it does sound better” and you keep refining and that’s how you end up with the collaboration.

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