Manose | Live In Kathmandu

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
John McLaughlin Ravi Shankar Zakir Hussain

Album Links
official website

More Artists From
Nepal

Other Genres You Will Love
World: Indian Classical Jazz: World Fusion Moods: Instrumental
Sell your music everywhere
There are no items in your wishlist.

Live In Kathmandu

by Manose

In a previous incarnation, bamboo flute player Manose created this remarkable tabla, guitar, and flute trio fusing the musical traditions of Nepal with jazz, rock and blues reminiscent of John McLaughlin’s Shakti;improvised, energetic, acoustic, original.
Genre: World: Indian Classical
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Continue Shopping
available for download only
Share to Google +1

To listen to tracks you will need to update your browser to a recent version.

  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Yantra
Mahayantra
15:00 $0.99
clip
2. Tandav (Dance of Shiva)
Mahayantra
8:32 $0.99
clip
3. Will You
Mahayantra
5:15 $0.99
clip
4. Friday Night in Kathmandu
Mahayantra
9:43 $0.99
clip
5. Ganges Blues
Mahayantra
10:19 $0.99
clip
6. In Memory of the Fallen
Mahayantra
7:10 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
In a previous incarnation, bamboo flute player Manose created this remarkable tabla, guitar, and flute trio fusing the musical traditions of Nepal with jazz, rock and blues reminiscent of John McLaughlin’s Shakti; largely improvised, 100% acoustic, organic and original, Mahayantra revolutionized the Nepali music scene.

Featuring Manose on bamboo flute, Narvraj Gurung on tabla, and Sunil Bardewa on acoustic guitar, is something truly exceptional: a fusion band that really fuses something, and in doing so unleashes the outburst of energy that fusion implies.

The success of their musical chemistry begins with the premise that music is universal, borderless, and boundaryless. Mahayanta moves seamlessly from East to West, and across the musical landscape as well. You will hear guitar melodies that could easily belong to a rock and roll ballad transform gracefully into the familiar notes of a Nepali folk song.

The way in which these three formidable talents have brought together their own powerful contributions is also a remarkable act of fusion. What you might expect from a meeting of three solo artists on one stage is a struggle for domination. But half the fun of listening to Mahayantra is following the changing roles of the tabla, flute, and guitar. It is a pleasure, for example, to hear the staccato of the tabla, which has just been leading the group fearlessly forward, step momentarily aside to let the penetrating voice of the flute speak out. In fact, it is unusual to hear three instruments share a stage so equally.

The music, like the musicians, is lighthearted and serious at once. It can be playful, but is has a depth that can only come from the total dedication of the musician to the music itself. Mahayantra’s songs are by turns melancholy, as in “In Memory of the Fallen,” dedicated to victims of political violence, romantic (“Will You?”), and swaggering (“Friday Night in Kathmandu”). Sometimes the hands of the players move so fast that they become blurred, and sometimes the notes float unhurriedly across the stage.

Every moment the listener is treated to something new and unexpected, and the music has something to offer to all different kinds of music lovers. One can lose one’s self in the details of the tapestry or give in to the pull of the undulating rhythms.

The gripping energy of the music, the originality of Mahayantra’s all self composed pieces, and the technical mastery shown by Manose, Narvraj, and Sunil combine to make Mahayantra an exceptional fusion band.

Read more...

Reviews


to write a review