Manuel Rego | High Tango

Go To Artist Page

Recommended if You Like
Astor Piazzola Horacio Salgan Raul De Blasio

More Artists From
Argentina

Other Genres You Will Love
Latin: Tango Classical: Piano solo Moods: Mood: Virtuoso
Sell your music everywhere
There are no items in your wishlist.

High Tango

by Manuel Rego

Pianist Manuel Rego devoted his brilliant international career to classical music. He was widely considered Argentina’s foremost musician. The Buenos Aires Critics Association named him “Best Argentine Instrumentalist” in 1989. In 1999 he received the coveted Life Achievement Award “Estrella de Mar de Oro”, to honor the finest artist in the country. His performances captivated reviewers in Paris, London and Amsterdam. By the end of his life he retired into self-imposed obscurity. Before his death, however, he felt compelled to travel to Buenos Aires to record his final and stunning album of tangos. It was his personal tribute in honoring the popular music his country is best known for. Although his previous classical recordings were released in South America, he wanted “High Tango” to be released only in the United States, a country he seldom visited. Manuel Rego portrays the tango enriched with the immensity of insights of the classical universe.
Genre: Latin: Tango
Release Date: 

We'll ship when it's back in stock

Order now and we'll ship when it's back in stock, or enter your email below to be notified when it's back in stock.
Sign up for the CD Baby Newsletter
Your email address will not be sold for any reason.
Continue Shopping
available for download only
Share to Google +1

To listen to tracks you will need to update your browser to a recent version.

  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Delirio
4:44 $0.99
clip
2. Flores Negras
2:47 $0.99
clip
3. Tango del Eco
3:53 $0.99
clip
4. La Bordona
3:12 $0.99
clip
5. Melancolico
2:55 $0.99
clip
6. Requiem Para Los Que Viven
6:01 $0.99
clip
7. Aquellos Tangos Camperos
3:54 $0.99
clip
8. Danzarin
3:27 $0.99
clip
9. Picasso
2:07 $0.99
clip
10. Grillito
2:36 $0.99
clip
11. Tango en Mi Mayor
4:08 $0.99
clip
12. Horacio y Adolfo (Arr. by H. Salgan)
1:09 $0.99
clip
13. Tango
3:44 $0.99
clip
14. Inquieto Como el Mar
3:12 $0.99
clip
15. Tango
2:57 $0.99
clip
16. Dos Tangos Para Piano
7:38 $0.99
clip
17. Lo Que Vendra
4:09 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
(Ver versión en ESPAÑOL más abajo)

HIGH TANGO

Pianist Manuel Rego devoted his brilliant international career to classical music. He was widely considered Argentina’s foremost musician. The Buenos Aires Critics Association named him “Best Argentine Instrumentalist” in 1989. In 1999 he received the coveted Life Achievement Award “Estrella de Mar de Oro”, to honor the finest artist in the country. His performances captivated reviewers in Paris, London and Amsterdam.

By the end of his life Rego retired into self-imposed obscurity. Before his death, however, he felt compelled to travel to Buenos Aires to record his final and stunning album of tangos. It was his personal tribute in honoring the popular music his country is best known for. Although his previous classical recordings were released in South America, he wanted “High Tango” to be released only in the United States, a country he seldom visited. Manuel Rego portrays the tango enriched with the immensity of insights of the classical universe. This is a remarkable album for tango, jazz and classical aficionados alike.


ABOUT MANUEL REGO

Manuel Rego made a memorable European debut at Salle Pleyel, Paris in 1965, followed by recitals at Salle Cortot, London’s Wigmore Hall and Amsterdam’s Concertgebouw, with outstanding critical headlines: “The Discovery of a Great Pianist” (Le Parisien); “Manuel Rego Possess a Perfect, Complete Technique” (Figaro); “Pianist Works a Miracle” (The London Times); “Virtuoso Pianist” (Het Parool, Amsterdam). Throughout his career, Rego performed intensively in Europe, Latin America, and Japan, but only a couple of times in the United States. He appeared as soloist with conductors Pierre Dervaux, Willem van Otterloo, Hors Stein, Jean-Claude Casadessus, Stanislav Scrowaczewski, Vicente Spiteri, Jacques Bodmer, Witold Rowicki, Andre Vandernoot, Dean Dixon, Otto Gerdes, Kurt Woss, Leopold Hager, Stanislav Wislocki, Gabor Otvos, Thomas Michalak, Ronald Zollman, Carlos Spierer, Juan José Castro, Pedro I. Calderón, Guillermo Scarabino and Bruno Martinotti among many others.

Manuel Rego’s several recordings include Schumann’s Kreisleriana and Fantastic Pieces Op. 12, a selection of Mendelssohn’s Songs Without Words, selected Preludes and Poems by Scriabin, selected works by Poulenc, Mompou’s Escenas Intimas, Sonatas by Gallupi and Clementi, Falla’s Fantasia Betica, Sonatas for Piano and Violin by Debussy and Ravel with violinist Rubén Gonzales, Dohnanyi’s Quintet No. 1 and Bridge’s Quintet both for piano and string quartet, Saenz’ Aquel Buenos Aires, and a live recording of several Mozart Sonatas and the Variations K.573.

His devotion to chamber music deserves special mention. He performed extensively with artists of international acclaim, among others the Berlin Philharmonic String Quartet, Cellist Christine Walevska and violinist Alberto Lisi. Since its founding by the City of Mar del Plata in 1981 until 2001, he was Artistic Director and pianist of “Quinteto Rego”. After many concert appearances in South America, the Quintet made several European tours performing in England, Italy, Spain, Bulgaria, Poland, Greece and Luxemburg.

Manuel Rego died in his home town Mar del Plata, Argentina, in 2008.


THE PIANISTIC HIGHS OF TANGO
By Rene Vargas Vera
Composer and music reviewer for “La Nacion of Buenos Aires.
Buenos Aires, February 2004

(English version by Samantha and Ben Lev)

Manuel Rego is one of the most prestigious Argentine pianists. Prestige is more important than fame because fame is always mischievous and short lived. Prestige, however, warrants wings of eternity.

Rego is above all a musician, which is much more significant than calling him a virtuoso pianist. There are virtuoso pianists that overwhelm their audience with technicalities and opulence but are not touched by the magic wand of music; the magic wand that allows the listener to take a look towards what is unfathomable and elusive in good music. Without falling into the elitist “démodé” that perceives intrinsic beauty only in classic compositions, Rego truly loves all well-written music without discriminating against different genres. In doing so, Rego honors the convictions of Béla Bartók, who discovered the high value of the “immense, complex and unheard-of treasure of melodies” in the bosom of Hungarian people.

Rego choose to bring us tangos written specifically for the piano. His is neither a chronological nor retrospective look, nor does it exhibit conformity of styles. As a result, he unites the tangos of erudite composers like Constantino Gaito with those of lesser-known musicians including Hugo Dasso and Daniel Castro (Who dedicates two assembled tangos to Rego). He also adds the works of rarely transited composers like Pedro Sáenz, the pensive Emilio de la Peña, the curiosity of a tango by jazzman Enrique “Mono” Villegas” (dedicated to Horacio Salgán and Adolfo Abalos) and also a tango by the aforementioned paradigmatic folkloric pianist, Abalos.

It is an arduous task to analyze Rego’s versions of the tangos. Each carries its own indelible mark, specially the most well-known and traditional ones. With his polished piano technique, Rego immerses himself in the subtleties of diverse styles ranging from the exquisite “Flores Negras” by Francisco de Caro, to two tangos by Julián Plaza, to three by Salgán, and on through the tangos by Emilio Balcarce and Francisco Mario Francini.

1. Delirio. Rego opens the sequence with Enrique Mario Francini’s “Delirio”, due to its nostalgic, melancholy and orchestral explosions.

2. Flores Negras. It is a pleasure to perceive Rego’s skill in DeCaro’s beautiful classic “Flores Negras”. The relentless phrasing, the dynamics, the subtle ornamentation, the playful counterpoint of both hands and the melodic flare are all employed by Rego to emphasize the profound romanticism flooding the work.

3. Tango del Eco. Rego incorporates insights he has gained from late-night chats with Don Horacio Salgán in Mar del Plata. His crystalline touch is masterly expressed with its almost harpsichord-like impulse, plays and rich texture.

4. La Bordona. Balcarce’s celebrated “La Bordona” is restless and delicate and at times it is even mysterious before it later materializes into an incisive rhythm.

5. Melancólico by Julián Plaza fully strikes the firm accents and their expansions before later delving into the melodic turn that gives this tango its title.

6. Requiem Para Los Que Viven. Next Rego brings the work “Requiem para los que viven” by stupendous pianist and inspired composer Emilio de la Peña. In some melodic sections it bears classical strokes reminiscent of Chopin and Debussy, yet it also embraces simple melody with certain turns resembling Piazzola, to whom this tango is dedicated.

7. Aquellos Tangos Camperos is another Salgán tango (in collaboration with De Lío) dedicated to Rego. It is saturated in vintage and refined airs, yet this does not deprive the song of its impulse, as it can be heard in the extremes of the keyboard and the thousand ornaments in its orchestral style.

8. Danzarín. Rego provides the most aristocratically cosmopolitan rhythms to the wonderful tango “Danzarin”, by Plaza. The song later goes on to expand itself in its marked canyengue features and its romanticism tinted with melancholy.

9. Picasso. Rego makes a delight to the chromatic “Picasso”. A tango composed in Paris during the mid-fifties, “Picasso” is an early collaboration by Astor Piazzola and his teacher Nadia Boulanger. This is a recondite and delicate tango, uncommon for a fiery artist like Piazzola.

10. Grillito. “Picasso’s” counterpart can be found in the rapid, euphoric and harpsichord-like “Grillito” by Salgán. It exhibits the most refine canyengue while capturing the emphatic accents found in the tangos of Buenos Aires. There is no doubt that Rego has learned Salgán’s style “to the letter”.

11. Tango en Mi Mayor. During the mid-fifties Hugo Dasso was able to harvest influences from the best tango composers without leaning in any one particular direction. He is a good composer as the men who influenced him in his refinement of the tango.

12. Horacio y Adolfo. In an almost fleeting meditation, jazzman Villegas chooses to submerge himself into the esoteric in his tango, dedicated to Salgán and Abalos. Rego is able to outline the contours of this climate in this arrangement by Salgán.

13. Tango. Classical composers became attracted to tango (may be a mischief) when they caught a glimpse of the genre’s contour, its grace and its “picaresque” quality. This characteristic is what gives Constantino Gaito’s tango its amusing innocence and allows it to serve as a pleasant shade in this compilation.


14. Inquieto Como el Mar. Folklorist Adolfo Abalos elaborates on “Inquieto Como el Mar” (A tango dedicated to the city of Mar del Plata) with an extroverted piano virtuosity that avoids grandiose pretensions in a style that goes well with adroit fingers.

15. Tango. Pedro Sáenz’ “Tango” penetrates from the arcane towards the cosmopolitan rhythm before returning to a feeling of the unfathomable. Rego knows very well about this detailed art.

16. Dos Tangos Para Piano. Daniel Castro’s tangos gather resonance in an inspired gamut of modern styles. In retrospective visions, he garnishes them with a breath of classical music that seems to prolong the possibilities of other findings.

17. Lo Que Vendrá. Piazzola told us that he composed this work at the piano. Nevertheless, it is difficult to believe that “Lo Que Vendrá” was written specially for the piano, because the texture and structure seems more suited to his favorite group, the quintet. However, once filtered through Rego’s sifter, the composition’s rhythmical orchestral impulse takes breadth and indulges in its great lyricism and melancholy. Special mention deserves the “cadenza” composed by Hugo Potenza, because of its colorful piano techniques and attractive ideas.

Rego portrays the tango as enriched with the immensity of insights of the classical universe. These insights impressed critics in Paris, London and Amsterdam alike. To discover the marvelous touch of this great master, this CD must be listened to several times.

_________________________________________________________________________

(Versión en ESPAÑOL)

HIGH TANGO

El pianista Manuel Rego dedicó su brillante carrera internacional a la música clásica. Fue ampliamente reconocido en vida como el más destacado músico argentino. La sociedad de Críticos de Buenos Aires lo nombró “Mejor Instrumentista Argentino” en 1989. En 1999 recibió el preciado premio “Estrella de Oro de Mar” honrando al artista más destacado del país. Sus conciertos cautivaron a la crítica de Paris, Londres y Amsterdam.

Al final de su vida Rego se retiró voluntariamente a la obscuridad y el olvido. Sin embargo, poco antes de morir, se sintió impulsado a viajar a Buenos Aires y grabar un último y prodigioso álbum de tangos. Era su tributo personal para honrar la música más reconocida de su país. Aunque sus previas grabaciones fueron publicadas en Sudamérica, el quiso que “High Tango” fuera publicado solamente en los Estados Unidos, un país al que muy pocas veces visitó. Manuel Rego presenta en este álbum un tango enriquecido por la inmensidad de percepciones de su universo clásico. Este es un álbum extraordinario, que deleitará por igual a los aficionados del buen tango, el jazz y la música clásica.


MANUEL REGO

Manuel Rego hizo un memorable debut europeo en Salle Pleyel, Paris en 1965, seguido por recitales en Salle Cortot, Wigmore Hall de Londres y el Concertgebouw de Amsterdam, con extraordinarios titulares de la critica: “Descubrimiento de un Gran Pianista” (Le Parisién); “Manuel Rego Posee Una Técnica Perfecta y Completa (Fígaro); “Pianista Realiza Milagro” (The London Times); “Pianista Virtuoso” (Het Parool, Amsterdam). A través de su carrera Rego se presentó asiduamente en Europa, Sudamérica y Japón, pero solamente un par de veces en los Estados Unidos. Actuó como solista con los renombrados directores Pierre Dervaux, Willem van Otterloo, Hors Stein, Jean-Claude Casadessus, Stanislav Scrowaczewski, Vicente Spiteri, Jacques Bodmer, Witold Rowicki, Andre Vandernoot, Dean Dixon, Otto Gerdes, Kurt Woss, Leopold Hager, Stanislav Wislocki, Gabor Otvos, Thomas Michalak, Ronald Zollman, Carlos Spierer, Juan José Castro, Pedro I. Calderón, Guillermo Scarabino, Bruno Martinotti y muchos otros.

Las numerosas grabaciones de Manuel Rego incluyen “Kreisleriana” y “Piezas Fantásticas Op. 12” de Schumann, una selección de “Canciones Sin Palabras” de Mendelssohn, una selección de “Preludios y Poemas” de Scriabin, una selección de obras de Poulenc, “Escenas Intimas” de Mompou, “Sonatas” de Gallupi y Clementi, “Fantasía Bética” de Falla, “Sonatas para Piano y Violín” de Debussy y Ravel con el violinista Rubén Gonzáles, el “Quinteto No. 1” de Dohnany y el “Quinteto” de Bridge, ambos para piano y cuarteto de cuerdas, “Aquel Buenos Aires” de Sáenz, y una grabación en vivo de varias “Sonatas” y la “Variación K.573” de Mozart.

Su devoción por la música de cámara merece una mención especial. Rego colaboró asiduamente con artistas de fama internacional, entre ellos el Cuarteto de Cuerdas de la Orquesta Filarmónica de Berlín, la cellista Christine Walevska y el violinista Alberto Lisi. A partir de su fundación por el gobierno de la Ciudad de Mar del Plata en 1981, y hasta el 2001, fue Director Artístico y pianista del “Quinteto Rego”. Luego de numerosas presentaciones en Sudamérica, el Quinteto cumplió con varias giras europeas en Inglaterra, Italia, España, Bulgaria, Polonia, Grecia y Luxemburgo.

Manuel Rego falleció en Mar del Plata, su ciudad de residencia, en 2008.


REGO, LAS ALTURAS PIANISTICAS DEL TANGO (Traducción libre de la versión inglesa)
Rene Vargas Vera
Compositor y crítico musical de “La Nación” de Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires, Febrero 2004.


Manuel Rego es uno de los más prestigiosos pianistas argentinos. Prestigio es más importante que fama, porque la fama es elusiva y de corta vida. El prestigio en cambio, otorga alas de eternidad.

Pero por encima de todo, Rego es músico, que es mucho más significativo que decir un pianista virtuoso. Hay virtuosos que apabullan a su audiencia con su técnica y opulencia, pero no están tocados por la varita mágica de la música, esa varita mágica que permite al oyente una vislumbre de lo inextricable y elusivo en la música. Sin caer en lo elitista “demodé”, que percibe la belleza intrínseca solamente en las composiciones clásicas, Rego verdaderamente ama toda música bien escrita sin discriminación de géneros. En esto, Rego honra las convicciones de Bèla Bártok, quien descubrió el alto valor del “inmenso, complejo y desconocido tesoro de melodías” en el seno del pueblo Húngaro.

Rego elige traernos tangos escritos específicamente para el piano. Su mirada no es cronológica ni retrospectiva, ni tampoco exhibe una conformidad de estilos. El resultado es una unión de compositores eruditos como Constantino Gaito, con músicos menos conocidos incluyendo a Hugo Dasso y Daniel Castro (quien dedica a Rego dos tangos ensamblados). También adiciona obras de compositores raramente transitados como Pedro Sáenz, el pensativo Emilio de la Peña, la curiosidad de un tango del “jazzman” Enrique “Mono” Villegas (dedicado a Horacio Salgán y Adolfo Abalos) y también un tango del mencionado y paradigmático folklorista Abalos.

Es una ardua tarea analizar las versiones de tango de Rego. Cada una lleva su propio sello imborrable, especialmente en los más conocidos y tradicionales. Con su pulida técnica pianística, Rego se sumerge en las sutilezas diversas de cada estilo, desde el exquisito “Flores Negras” de Francisco de Caro, a dos tangos de Julián Plaza, a tres de Salgan y atravesando por los tangos de Emilio Balcarce y Francisco Mario Francini.

1. Delirio. Rego abre la secuencia con “Delirio” de Enrique Mario Francini, tal vez debido a su carácter nostálgico, melancólico y de explosiones orquestales.

2. Flores Negras. Es un placer percibir la destreza de Rego en el hermoso clásico
“Flores Negras” de De Caro. El fraseo impecable, los matices, la ornamentación sutil, el juego contrapuntístico de ambas manos y el vuelo melódico, son todos utilizados por Rego para enfatizar el profundo romanticismo que inunda la obra.

3. Tango del Eco. Rego incorpora percepciones captad en largas charlas nocheras con Don Horacio Salgan en Mar del Plata. Su toque cristalino es expresado magistralmente con un impulso casi clavecinístico y rica textura.

4. La Bordona de Balcarce es inquietante, delicada e incluso a veces misteriosa, antes de materializarse después, en un ritmo incisivo.

5. Melancólico de Julián Plaza ataca de lleno los firmes acentos y expansiones, antes de hurgar en el giro melódico que da su titulo a este tango.

6. Réquiem Para Los Que Viven. Seguidamente Rego nos trae la obra “Réquiem Para Los Que Viven” del estupendo pianista e inspirado compositor Emilio de la Peña. En algunas secciones melódicas acusa rasgos clásicos reminiscentes de Chopin y Debussy, pero también adopta la melodía simple con ciertos giros de Piazzola, a quien este tango es dedicado.

7. Aquellos Tangos Camperos es otro tango de Salgán (en colaboración con De Lio) dedicado a Rego. Está saturado de añejos y refinados aires, lo cual no priva la pieza de su impulso, como puede oírse en los extremos del teclado y los mil ornamentos de su estilo orquestal.

8. Danzarín. Rego nos trae los ritmos más aristocráticos y cosmopolitas en el maravilloso tango “Danzarín”, de Plaza. La pieza se expande más adelante en su marcado rasgo “canyengue” y su romanticismo impregnado de melancolía.

9. Picasso. Rego hace una delicia del cromático “Picasso”. Tango compuesto en Paris en los mediados del 50, “Picasso” es una temprana colaboración de Astro Piazzola y su maestra de composición Nadia Boulanger. Es un tango recóndito y delicado, nada común para un artista ardoroso como Piazzola.

10. Grillito. La contraparte de “Picasso” puede ser encontrada en el rápido, eufórico y clavecinístico “Grillito” de Salgan. Exhibe un refinadísimo “canyengue”, mientras que captura los enfáticos acentos de los tangos de Buenos Aires. No hay duda que Rego ha aprendido el estilo de Salgan “al pie de la letra”.

11. Tango en Mi Mayor. Durante los mediados del 50, Hugo Dasso fue capaz de cosechar influencias de los mejores compositores de tango, sin inclinarse hacia una dirección en particular. Es él un buen compositor, como así son los hombres que influyeron en su refinamiento del tango.

12. Horacio y Adolfo. En una meditación casi furtiva, el “jazzman” Villegas elige sumergirse en lo esotérico en este tango dedicado a Salgán y Abalos. Rego logra resaltar los contornos de este clima, en este arreglo de Salgán.

13. Tango. Compositores clásicos llegaron a ser atraídos por el tango (tal vez un desvarío) cuando capturaron una vislumbre del género, su gracia y su cualidad picaresca. Esta característica es lo que da al tango de Constantino Gaito su solazada inocencia y permite servir a modo de matiz placentero, en esta compilación.

14. Inquieto Como el Mar. El folklorista Adolfo Abalos elabora en “Inquieto Como el Mar” (un tango dedicado a la ciudad de Mar del Plata) un virtuosismo pianístico extravertido que evita pretensiones grandiosas, en un estilo que se lleva bien con dedos diestros.

15. Tango. El “Tango” de Pedro Sáenz penetra desde lo arcano a un ritmo cosmopolita, antes de retornar a una percepción de lo inescrutable. Rego sabe muy bien acerca de este arte minucioso

16. Dos Tangos Para Piano. Los tangos de Daniel Castro adquieren resonancia en una inspirada gama de estilos modernos. Con visiones retrospectivas, los adereza con un aire clasicista que pareciera prolongar las posibilidades de otros hallazgos.

17. Lo Que Vendrá. Piazzola nos dijo que compuso esta obra sentado al piano. Aun así, es difícil creer que “Lo Que Vendrá” fue escrito especialmente para el piano, porque la textura y estructura parecieran más adecuadas para su grupo favorito, el quinteto. De todos modos, una vez filtrado a través del tamiz de Rego, el impulso rítmico-orquestal de la composición se engrandece y se satisface en su gran lirismo y melancolía. Mención especial merece la “cadenza” compuesta por Hugo Potenza, por su colorida técnica pianística y sus atractivas ideas.

Rego retrata a un tango enriquecido por la inmensidad de percepciones de su universo clásico. Estas percepciones impresionaron a críticos de Paris, Londres y Amsterdam. Para descubrir el toque maravilloso de este gran maestro, este CD debe ser escuchado varias veces.






Read more...

Reviews


to write a review

Carlos (Argentina)

Excelente
Buen sonido, perfecta ejecución, un gran pianista sin duda ...Great sound, perfect execution, a great pianist certainly ...
Read more...

george

High Tango
Excelente los temas elegidos y una interpretacion de primer nivel. Puede apreciarse su fluidez y a la vez la comunicacion entre la muscia y el oyente que hace de este cd una obra para coleccionar y disfrutarla una y otra vez.
Read more...

Horacio

Muy bueno !
Excelente versión ! El mejor ejemplo de como un gran intérprete clásico puede abordar muy bien la música popular...!
Read more...

Carolyn

Outstanding pianism
Tangos played by a superb pianist!
Read more...