Mark Sinnis | The Night's Last Tomorrow

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Country: Alt-Country Country: Americana Moods: Type: Acoustic
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The Night's Last Tomorrow

by Mark Sinnis

The 3rd release from Alt Country crooner Mark Sinnis. This album continues his dark journey through Americana Goth with 15 songs of Life, Love, Relationships and Death.
Genre: Country: Alt-Country
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. The Night's Last Tomorrow
4:24 $0.99
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2. 15 Miles To Hell's Gate
4:00 $0.99
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3. Your Past May Come Back To Haunt Me
3:46 $0.99
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4. Fallible Friend
4:11 $0.99
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5. Follow the Line
3:55 $0.99
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6. Nine While Nine
4:55 $0.99
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7. The Fever
3:20 $0.99
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8. Skeletons
2:57 $0.99
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9. Scars
2:37 $0.99
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10. St. James Infirmary
3:03 $0.99
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11. Out of Reach
4:48 $0.99
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12. Quiet Change
3:41 $0.99
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13. Gloomy Sunday
5:09 $0.99
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14. In Harmony
2:42 $0.99
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15. When the Light Blinds and You Follow
3:21 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Review by Mick Mercer:

"The Night's Last Tomorrow"

As satisfying as last year’s darkly compelling ‘A Southern Tale’ this album relaxes in some comfort. Sinnis has achieved a type of decisive bleakness here which means he can do it almost softly, as the Gothic and Country influences melt lazily or hazily together. Where ‘A Southern Tale’ seemed a closeted collection, as though recorded indoors secretively, trying to keep something out and thoughts locked in, this album seems bathed in cool light, as though recorded outdoors. Never maudlin, while definitely moving on from glass-half-empty to gargling-poison-dismissively, it takes dark moods and lightens the load while you listen.

‘The Night's Last Tomorrow’ is a wonderfully drippy thing, the delicate balance seemingly suspended from the steel guitar, as quality lyrics also hover, Sinnis’ vocals quivering somewhat but sticking to the point in a masterful display. It lulls you completely, because in another style it could be deeply depressing but here it’s a curiously blissful opener. In the troubled ‘15 Miles To Hell's Gate’ he’s like a swashbuckling son of Johnny Cash, swaying and crooning dramatically, then we move towards an almost laconic ‘Your Past May Come Back To Haunt Me’ which unrolls a soothing red carpet beneath twisted, suspicious lyrics all demurely wrapped in a smartly delineated arrangement that harnesses past styles and modern attitudes, allowing menace to mellow. ‘Fallible Friend’ could just as easily go with some mariachi, or frisky acoustic, but it’s a plain and simple song instead, moving at a steady grim pace, like a crotchety Clint Eastwood whittling his own wooden leg. Time slows, it’s that stately. ‘Follow the Line’ is easier on the ear, lilting musically while the vocals threaten to tip over the edge, which is almost out of character in this setting. An unexpected and dignified cover of ‘Nine While Nine’ also works very well with a refined delivery.

We slide down a creepy chute during ‘The Fever’ with some queasy imagery, then skate warily over a playful lake of doubt in ‘Skeletons’ with its cunning use of organ. ‘Scars’ is odd, like an old Simon & Garfunkel melody squashed flat, a fridge over befuddled slaughter, and the traditional ‘St. James Infirmary’ is very strange as well, as befits a song so old the original creator isn’t positively known. This is a melodramatic piece of doom, where the words clash with the properly agonised mood. The protagonist’s love is dead, in the mortuary (I assume) and he’s proudly proclaiming, ‘she’ll never find another man like me.’ Well, how gallant, unless I’m missing something?

We touch down again on a softly sentimental ‘Out of Reach’, and perk up during the fabulous ‘Quiet Change’ which has a rising commercial tug about it, and then during a brilliant ‘Gloomy Sunday’ you get to see what Sinnis can do when cooped up with an unlikely task, like Roy Orbison walking down subterranean corridors, alone in the dark. Rewriting a well known song he tinkers with certain lines and while he changes the end for what must have been a personal need, at one point he actually improves a line completely and there’s not many people can do that, which may explain why on his website lyrics are referred to defiantly as poetry. ‘In Harmony’ will confuse as the churchy feel professes a quiet relief that death is approaching, as a friend, in catchy surroundings, then it all dies slowly away for good with the suitably sensitive ‘When the Light Blinds and You Follow’

A remarkably assured album this, and in many ways it must be quite funny for him, considering his punky past. I bet half his relatives are thinking, ‘he was bound to come to his senses eventually.’ Mature, melodic and at times as restful as it is haunting, this is really quite superb and as he’s releasing an album ever year you wonder when he’ll peak, because this is still just the ascent.

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Reviews


to write a review

Sara

Speechless!
I have all of Mark Sinnis's CDs even Ninth House and this guy just gets better and better. Sad how bad the music business is that he is not bigger. Hopefully more people will discover this gem.
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Mick Mercer

Mick Mercer review of Mark Sinnis ~ The Night's Last Tomorrow
As satisfying as last year’s darkly compelling ‘A Southern Tale’ this album relaxes in some comfort. Sinnis has achieved a type of decisive bleakness here which means he can do it almost softly, as the Gothic and Country influences melt lazily or hazily together. Where ‘A Southern Tale’ seemed a closeted collection, as though recorded indoors secretively, trying to keep something out and thoughts locked in, this album seems bathed in cool light, as though recorded outdoors. Never maudlin, while definitely moving on from glass-half-empty to gargling-poison-dismissively, it takes dark moods and lightens the load while you listen.

‘The Night's Last Tomorrow’ is a wonderfully drippy thing, the delicate balance seemingly suspended from the steel guitar, as quality lyrics also hover, Sinnis’ vocals quivering somewhat but sticking to the point in a masterful display. It lulls you completely, because in another style it could be deeply depressing but here it’s a curiously blissful opener. In the troubled ‘15 Miles To Hell's Gate’ he’s like a swashbuckling son of Johnny Cash, swaying and crooning dramatically, then we move towards an almost laconic ‘Your Past May Come Back To Haunt Me’ which unrolls a soothing red carpet beneath twisted, suspicious lyrics all demurely wrapped in a smartly delineated arrangement that harnesses past styles and modern attitudes, allowing menace to mellow. ‘Fallible Friend’ could just as easily go with some mariachi, or frisky acoustic, but it’s a plain and simple song instead, moving at a steady grim pace, like a crotchety Clint Eastwood whittling his own wooden leg. Time slows, it’s that stately. ‘Follow the Line’ is easier on the ear, lilting musically while the vocals threaten to tip over the edge, which is almost out of character in this setting. An unexpected and dignified cover of ‘Nine While Nine’ also works very well with a refined delivery.

We slide down a creepy chute during ‘The Fever’ with some queasy imagery, then skate warily over a playful lake of doubt in ‘Skeletons’ with its cunning use of organ. ‘Scars’ is odd, like an old Simon & Garfunkel melody squashed flat, a fridge over befuddled slaughter, and the traditional ‘St. James Infirmary’ is very strange as well, as befits a song so old the original creator isn’t positively known. This is a melodramatic piece of doom, where the words clash with the properly agonised mood. The protagonist’s love is dead, in the mortuary (I assume) and he’s proudly proclaiming, ‘she’ll never find another man like me.’ Well, how gallant, unless I’m missing something?

We touch down again on a softly sentimental ‘Out of Reach’, and perk up during the fabulous ‘Quiet Change’ which has a rising commercial tug about it, and then during a brilliant ‘Gloomy Sunday’ you get to see what Sinnis can do when cooped up with an unlikely task, like Roy Orbison walking down subterranean corridors, alone in the dark. Rewriting a well known song he tinkers with certain lines and while he changes the end for what must have been a personal need, at one point he actually improves a line completely and there’s not many people can do that, which may explain why on his website lyrics are referred to defiantly as poetry. ‘In Harmony’ will confuse as the churchy feel professes a quiet relief that death is approaching, as a friend, in catchy surroundings, then it all dies slowly away for good with the suitably sensitive ‘When the Light Blinds and You Follow’

A remarkably assured album this, and in many ways it must be quite funny for him, considering his punky past. I bet half his relatives are thinking, ‘he was bound to come to his senses eventually.’ Mature, melodic and at times as restful as it is haunting, this is really quite superb and as he’s releasing an album ever year you wonder when he’ll peak, because this is still just the ascent.
Read more...

Lucid Culture

Mark Sinnis ~ The Night's Last Tomorrow
On the cover of his third solo album, Mark Sinnis, frontman of dark rockers Ninth House stands with his back to the camera, staring into a glaring New York sunset from a rooftop somewhere in Queens. The picture captures the subtext here far less subtly than Sinnis’ songs do: this is a requiem for lost time, lost hopes and by implication a lost time and place. It is a classic of gothic Americana. Richly and masterfully produced, electric guitars, strings, keyboards, lapsteel and accordion weave their way tersely into and out of the mix behind Sinnis’ remarkably nuanced baritone. Sinnis has been a good singer for a long time – he is an extraordinary one here, going down low for Leonard Cohen murk or reaching for Johnny Cash irony. If Ian Curtis had been an American, and he’d lived, he might sound like Sinnis does on this album.

The title track sets the tone for what’s to come, a slow, swaying, sad requiem, Sara Landeau’s sparse tremolo guitar mingling with Lenny Molotov’s lapsteel and Annette Kudrak’s plaintive accordion. It’s utterly hypnotic. The centerpiece of the album, or one of them anyway, is 15 Miles to Hell’s Gate, classic country done chamber goth style:

Fifteen miles to Hell’s Gate
And I’m a thousand miles from home
From New York City
The one that drags me into a hole
I’m in my own purgatory
Where I pay for my sins each day
And I pay dearly
While my youth slowly slips away

He picks it up a little on the second verse. It’s gently and masterfully orchestrated.

Originally released on Ninth House’s 2000 album Swim in the Silence, the version of Your Past May Come Back to Haunt Me [#290 on our 666 Best Songs of All time list - Ed.] recasts the song as slow, Leonard Cohen-esque country sway, Sinnis’ pitchblende vocals quite a change from his usual roar when Ninth House plays it live. Fallible Friend, a catalog of failure and deceit, goes for a dusky southwestern feel capped by Ninth House guitarist Keith Otten’s perfecly minimalist fills. An understatedly desperate account of a drunk driver just trying to get home in one piece, Follow the Line takes on a hallucinatory, wee hours feel with Kudrak’s swirling accordion front and center – when Sinnis finally cuts loose and belts on the second verse, she’s there to calm him down. The Fever (not the Peggy Lee standard) could be a John Lennon song, a bitter metaphorically charged tale of alienation and rebellion.

Of the other originals here, wobbling funeral parlor organ by Zach makes the perfect final touch on the brooding Skeletons. Scars is gospel as the Velvet Underground might have done it, Out of Reach transformed from its original electric menace to haunting death-chamber pop with Ninth House keyboardist Matt Dundas’ piano and stark cello from star New York string multistylist Susan Mitchell. There’s also the ghoulish country shuffle In Harmony, the uncharacteristically sunny Quiet Change, and the album’s last song, a death-fixated, quite possibly sarcastic gospel clapalong. The covers are also terrifically inventive: Nine While Nine captures the song’s grim grey tube train platform ambience far better than Sisters of Mercy ever did, Otten perfectly nailing the menace of the song’s simple hook; St. James Infirmary rips the death mask off the song’s inner goth, lap steel pairing off warily against tense piano; and Gloomy Sunday gets a new final verse from Sinnis, who leaves not the slightest doubt as to what that one’s about.

Sinnis’ first solo album Into an Unhidden Future was a treat for Ninth House fans, a diverse, often radically rearranged acoustic mix of hits and rarities. His second, A Southern Tale was more country-oriented and surprisingly more upbeat. This is the best of them, in fact arguably the best thing that Sinnis has ever recorded.
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Doktor John - The Aquarian

Mark Sinnis - The Night's Last Tomorrow
The Night’s Last Tomorrow is the third CD released by the frontman for Cemetery-and-Western band, Ninth House, and it is rich with both new material and mature, acoustic reinterpretations of songs, often featuring brave and innovative instrumentation to accompany Mark’s chocolaty vocals. Some have appeared on Sinnis’ two prior solo albums and Ninth House recordings. Mark hasn’t dropped his unwavering focus on death and how awareness of it causes us to see life’s experiences in a certain light.

The opening track, “The Night’s Last Tomorrow,” epitomizes this concept, and reaches heights of languid sadness thanks to the moody lap-steel guitar of bluesman, Lenny Molotov.

“15 Miles to Hell’s Gate” has a more frustrated, angry tone, whereas “Your Past May Come Back” is surprisingly upbeat and showcases Mark’s amazing, mellifluous vocals.

The “western” in “Cemetery-and-Western” is evident in “Fallible Friend.” My own particular favorite, “Follow the Line” is a dark, Ninth House treatise about suicidal drunkenness that is incredibly melodious, even in this relatively light, accordion-accompanied version.

Other tracks include new originals as well as acoustic tributes to the Sisters of Mercy, stripped down versions of songs by Sinnis’ old band, The Apostates, pieces with names like “Skeletons” and “Scars,” plus a New Orleans-flavored Louie Armstrong cover as well as Billy Holiday’s “Gloomy Sunday.” The album ends appropriately with a country gospel death-march.

Sinnis’ style is a blending of folk-rock and traditional country, western, gospel and blues that please and fascinate music lovers of every stripe.

In A Word: Brooding

—by Doktor John, May 27, 2010
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