Markus Geiselhart Orchestra | My Instrument Is the Orchestra

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My Instrument Is the Orchestra

by Markus Geiselhart Orchestra

Great Big Band, finding new ways and new combinations using interesting guitars and sounds!
Genre: Jazz: Big Band
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. My Instrument Is the Orchestra
5:09 $0.99
clip
2. Crazy Concepts from Vienna (feat. Thomas Kugi, Martin Koller & Herwig Gradischnig)
6:18 $0.99
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3. I Remember Hans and Marcus (feat. Herbert Joos)
6:42 $0.99
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4. Homecoming (feat. Romed Hopfgartner)
6:05 $0.99
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5. Brainwash (feat. Martin Koller)
5:27 $0.99
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6. Airport St. Petersburg (feat. Clemens Salesny)
5:03 $0.99
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7. The Spirit of Don Ellis (feat. Mario Rom & Mario Lackner)
7:57 $0.99
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8. Just a Short Idea (feat. Stefan Thaler & Alois Eberl)
6:58 $0.99
clip
9. Think About It! (feat. German Marstatt)
2:59 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
CLEMENS SALESNY (lead)—alto saxophone, saxello, bass clarinet ROMED HOPFGARTNER—alto saxophone, soprano saxophone THOMAS KUGI—tenor saxophone, soprano saxophone, clarinet SOPHIE HASSFURTHER—tenor saxophone, soprano saxophone, flute HERWIG GRADISCHNIG—baritone saxophone, bass clarinet
ANEEL SOOMARY (lead)—trumpet, flugelhorn TOBIAS REISACHER—trumpet, flugelhorn MARIO ROM—trumpet, flugelhorn GERMAN MARSTATT—trumpet, flugelhorn
DOMINIK STÖGER (lead)—trombone, euphonium MARIO VAVTI—trombone, euphonium ALOIS EBERL—trombone, euphonium ERIK HAINZL—bass trombone, tuba
MARTIN KOLLER—guitars (except 9) and big drum on 1 and 3 STEFAN THALER—double bass, electric bass (except 9) MARIO LACKNER—drums on 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8 THOMAS KÄFEL—drums on 2
MARKUS GEISELHART—conductor SPECIAL GUEST
HERBERT JOOS—flugelhorn soloist on “I remember Hans and Marcus”
SUBSTITUTES
PAUL GRITSCH—alto saxophone, flute replaced Romed Hopfgartner on 3, 5, 9 TOBIAS REISACHER—trumpet, flugelhorn replaced Aneel Soomary on 3, 5, 9 AXEL MAYER—trumpet, flugelhorn replaced Tobias Reisacher on 3, 5, 9 PHILIPP FELLNER—trombone, euphonium replaced Alois Eberl on 3, 5, 9
HERWIG GRADISCHNIG plays Schagerl Saxophones
ANEEL SOOMARY plays a Schagerl “Nodus” trumpet and mouthpieces by Toshiaki Kameyama MARTIN KOLLER plays PAG guitars by Stefan Greis and Elixir Strings
MARIO LACKNER plays Meinl Cymbals, Tama Drums & Vic Firth Drumsticks THOMAS KÄFEL plays Agner Drumsticks

This present CD „My Instrument is the Orchestra“ is the result of my work over the previous 10 to 15 years, during which time
I had to learn above all what I do not want, in order to recognize at all what I want. In music this way is similar to that in life. You believe you know what you want until you realize that you are led from the outside to what you have to want. Only after realizing that, you can start looking for what you really want yourself.
On this journey to my own will, I have tried to go new ways with this production – based on tradition in music. So I experimented in the matters of line up, composition and arrange- ment, but also with the way the production was mixed.
Enjoy listening to the recordings and find out for yourself what you “really want”.
Enjoy!
MARKUS GEISELHART

Of course, the band swings with every fibre.
It must. If it did not, you wouldn’t need such
a group of people, who are audibly ready to
give their all, no, do their utmost. Most people still misunderstand jazz as a soundtrack for relaxation: take it easy, man - corduroy pants music for intellectuals with tear bags. Markus Geiselhart, too, does not let himself get worked up too easily (possibly now and then by “his” soccer team VfB Stuttgart). Anyway, that’s how I got acquainted with him in Vienna. He was sitting at the bar of the 1070, stoically drinking one beer at a time. In an equally relaxed way he kept smoking his cigarettes when, suddenly and completely unexpected, he was aflame. Through the noise and the drifts of smoke he caught the drift of a solo by Bob Brookmeyer. All at once this placid Swabian was glowing, his excitement cut through the smoke like a laser and in short glistening sentences he exposed what made this solo unrivalled.
One time, half a year later, I encountered him in Reindorfgasse in the 15th district. A folk festival with the Viennese weather at its best. And right in the street, between sausage grills and beer barrels: a band of eclectic, audacious musicians, raring to go, have taken their seats and kicked off, showing no mercy. And up front Markus, who has an untiring eye for the out- rageously hard beat and rhythm changes even at 95°F. It’s unmistakable: the degree of heat produced here is not due to midsummer.
It is Geiselhart who has set a blaze.
It’s been a long time since Markus has given up smoking and hardly drinks any beer. So it was nothing that he once rode from Vienna to Stuttgart - by bike. Just for fun. Good for health.
But also for the music? Fact, Jazz has a lot to do with rebellion and liberation. Away from the ruthlessly well-beaten paths, which have become that reliable biography which we have laid while searching for assumed safety. That
is exactly what Markus Geiselhart runs against. Just from another side. The marathon man
has founded a big band with the young heroes of Austrian Jazz (who else, please, can come up with such an idea after Mathias Rüegg?), steadfastly composes and arranges his songs diligently and continues to push his musicians’ (as well as his own) frenzy and emotion buttons constantly (Herbert Joos’ heart-rending solo in “I remember Hans and Marcus”). “Just a short idea”, he would probably say seriously. What a gross understatement.
THOMAS WÖRDEHOFF

1 ↑ My Instrument is the Orchestra Composed & arranged by Markus Geiselhart
The title song is the answer to the question that people keep asking me: “What is your instrument?” It is not difficult for me to answer this question, since my work has been changing more and more over the last years from playing the trombone to composing, arranging and conducting. For those who ask the question, however, the answer is not so easily tangible. That is why I give the answer to the question with this composition: “My Instrument is the Orchestra”.

2↑ Crazy Concepts from Vienna
Composed & arranged by Markus Geiselhart
Soloists: Thomas Kugi (tenor saxophone), Herwig Gradischnig (baritone saxophone), Martin Koller (guitar)
Vienna is different! That is what a tourist to Vienna reads in big letters when driving into this impressive town from the West. I have been living in this city for 10 years now, which - when it comes to music - has shaped me more than my university town of Würzburg or my birth place Stuttgart. Vienna is different - and partly a bit crazy as well.

3↑ I remember Hans and Marcus Composed & arranged by Markus Geiselhart Soloist: Herbert Joos (flugelhorn)
This composition has been dedicated to the memory of two friends who left this world far too early. Hans-Jürgen Lehmann, without whom my way as a musician would for sure have been different, and Marcus Dall’Osteria.
When Herbert Joos recorded his solo for this song, my thoughts were also with Wolfgang Czelusta, our mutual friend and former solo trombonist with the Stuttgart Philharmonic Orchestra. Rest in Peace!
Als Herbert Joos sein Solo für diese Nummer einspielte, gingen meine Gedanken auch an unseren gemeinsamen Bekannten Wolfgang Czelusta, ehemaliger Solo-Posaunist der Stuttgarter Philharmoniker.

4↑ Homecoming
Composed & arranged by Markus Geiselhart Soloist: Romed Hopfgartner (alto saxophone)
Whoever travels and is on the road a lot, knows the feeling of coming home. Home, however, does not necessarily mean where you come from, but where you feel at home. That is why one of the most awesome moments of any journey is to come back
to Vienna.

5↑ Brainwash
Composed & arranged by Markus Geiselhart & Martin Koller Remix & sound design by Martin Koller
Soloist: Martin Koller (guitar)
Brainwash can affect you in a positive or a negative way. Occasionally, you need a brain- wash to think something anew. The prolific cooperation with Martin Koller goes back to a common concert (MGO meets KOLLER) during a series of concerts in the Vienna jazz club “Porgy & Bess”. Both the composition and Martin's remix and sound design try to open a new horizon for the big band format.

6↑ Airport St. Petersburg Composed & arranged by Markus Geiselhart Soloist: Clemens Salesny (alto saxophone)
St. Petersburg is one of the most impressive cities I have been to so far. Even more im- pressing, however, was the experience at its airport and the related flight to Moscow.
First, the flight was postponed again and again over hours. Then when it finally was about to happen, the airport bus went dead on target for a seemingly discarded Tupolew on the edge of the runway ...

7 ↑ The Spirit of Don Ellis
Composed & arranged by Markus Geiselhart
Soloists: Mario Rom (trumpet), Mario Lackner (drums)
There are only few musicians who have influenced me that strongly. Let this composition be dedicated to the great Don Ellis!

8↑ Just a Short Idea
Composed & arranged by Markus Geiselhart
Soloists: Stefan Thaler (bass), Alois Eberl (trombone)
This song is what its title says: “Just a Short Idea”.

9↑ Think about it!
Composed & arranged by Markus Geiselhart Soloist: German Marstatt (flugelhorn)
People think and reflect too little about the interrelations of things in this world and much is taken for granted. That’s why I ask you to “Think about it!”

This present CD „My Instrument is the Orchestra“ is the result of my work over the previous 10 to 15 years, during which time
I had to learn above all what I do not want, in order to recognize at all what I want. In music this way is similar to that in life. You believe you know what you want until you realize that you are led from the outside to what you have to want. Only after realizing that, you can start looking for what you really want yourself.
On this journey to my own will, I have tried to go new ways with this production – based on tradition in music. So I experimented in the matters of line up, composition and arrange- ment, but also with the way the production was mixed.
Enjoy listening to the recordings and find out for yourself what you “really want”.
Enjoy!
MARKUS GEISELHART

Natürlich swingt die Kapelle an allen Ecken und Enden. Muss ja auch. Sonst braucht es nämlich keinen solchen Trupp, der hörbar zum Letzten, nein, zum Allerletzten bereit ist. Jazz wird ja immer noch mehrheitlich als Soundtrack für Entspannung missverstanden, take it easy, altes Haus – Cordhosenmusik für Kopfmenschen mit Tränensäcken. Auch Markus Geiselhart lässt sich nur ganz schwer aus der Ruhe bringen (gelegentlich vielleicht von „seinem“ Verein, dem VfB Stuttgart) – so jedenfalls habe ich ihn in Wien kennengelernt. Er saß an der Bar des 1070 und trank stoisch ein Bier nach dem nächs- ten. Er rauchte mit der nämlichen Gelassenheit eine um die andere, um dann, ganz plötzlich und unerwartet, in Flammen zu stehen. Durch den Lärm und die Rauchschwaden an der Bar hatte er ein Solo von Bob Brookmeyer ausgemacht. Plötzlich glühte dieser gemütvolle Schwabe, seine Begeisterung durchschnitt den Qualm wie Laser und er legte uns in kurzen gleissenden Sätzen dar, was dieses unübertreffliche Solo ausmachte.
Irgendwann dann, ein halbes Jahr später ent- deckte ich ihn in der Reindorfgasse im 15. Bezirk. Ein Volksfest bei schönstem Wiener Wetter. Und mitten auf der Straße, zwischen Wurstgrills und Bierfässern hatte sich am Mittag eine Runde spielwütiger Ungeheuer niedergelassen und haut unerbittlich auf die Kacke. Und vorne Markus, der die sauschweren Takt- und Rhythmus- wechsel auch bei 35°C unverdrossen im Blick hat. Eindeutig: Der Hitzegrad, der hier erzeugt wird, ist keine Folge des Hochsommers. Es war der Geiselhart, der Feuer gelegt hat.
Markus raucht längst nicht mehr, trinkt kaum noch Bier. Ohne große Ankündigung ist er
irgendwann mal von Wien nach Stuttgart gefahren – mit dem Fahrrad. Einfach so. Gut für die Gesundheit.
Aber auch für die Musik? Jazz hat doch
was mit Rebellion und Befreiung zu tun. Weg von der blindwütigen Routine festgelegter Trampelpfade, die wir auf der Suche nach den vermeintlichen Sicherheiten einer gut situierten Biografie angelegt haben. Markus Geiselhart rennt genau dagegen an. Nur von der anderen Seite. Der Marathonmann gründete eine Big Band mit den jungen Helden des Ösi-Jazz
(wer kommt denn bitte nach Mathias Rüegg heute noch auf so eine Idee?), komponiert und arrangiert unerschütterlich seine Songs, und musiziert sich und seine Truppe in Rage und Rührung (zu Herzen gehend das Solo von Herbert Joos in „I remember Hans and Marcus“), immer weiter, immer weiter – just
a short idea only, würde er vermutlich allen Ernstes behaupten. Eine maßlose Untertreibung.
THOMAS WÖRDEHOFF

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