Matima | 100 Years: Early Beethoven & Late Brahms

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100 Years: Early Beethoven & Late Brahms

by Matima

Award-winning doctors of music present three of the greatest classical masterpieces as reflections of transforming world and musical aesthetics, but also of timelessness of music as a universal expression of humanity.
Genre: Classical: Chamber Music
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Piano Sonata No. 1 in F Minor, Op. 2 No. 1: I. Allegro
Matima & Makiko Hirata
4:29 $0.99
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2. Piano Sonata No. 1 in F Minor, Op. 2 No. 1: II. Adagio
Matima & Makiko Hirata
5:17 $0.99
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3. Piano Sonata No. 1 in F Minor, Op. 2 No. 1: III. Menuetto
Matima & Makiko Hirata
4:01 $0.99
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4. Piano Sonata No. 1 in F Minor, Op. 2 No. 1: IV. Prestissimo
Matima & Makiko Hirata
5:35 $0.99
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5. Sonata for Piano and Clarinet No. 1 in F Minor, Op. 120 No. 1: I. Allegro appassionato
Matima, Maiko Sasaki & Makiko Hirata
8:38 $0.99
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6. Sonata for Piano and Clarinet No. 1 in F Minor, Op. 120 No. 1: II. Andante un poco adagio
Matima, Maiko Sasaki & Makiko Hirata
5:36 $0.99
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7. Sonata for Piano and Clarinet No. 1 in F Minor, Op. 120 No. 1: III. Allegretto grazioso
Matima, Maiko Sasaki & Makiko Hirata
4:34 $0.99
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8. Sonata for Piano and Clarinet No. 1 in F Minor, Op. 120 No. 1: IV. Vivace
Matima, Maiko Sasaki & Makiko Hirata
5:35 $0.99
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9. Sonata for Piano and Clarinet No. 2 in E-Flat Major, Op. 120 No. 2: I. Allegro amabile
Matima, Maiko Sasaki & Makiko Hirata
9:06 $0.99
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10. Sonata for Piano and Clarinet No. 2 in E-Flat Major, Op. 120 No. 2: II. Allegro Appassionato
Matima, Maiko Sasaki & Makiko Hirata
5:57 $0.99
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11. Sonata for Piano and Clarinet No. 2 in E-Flat Major, Op. 120 No. 2: III. Andante Con Moto
Matima, Maiko Sasaki & Makiko Hirata
7:51 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
The hundred years between Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 1 and Brahms’ two Sonatas for Clarinet and Piano were revolutionary times, socially and musically. For one, the piano was quickly evolving, becoming larger in size, heavier with the incorporation of metal frame, louder with more string tension and quicker in its actions, reflecting the power of Industrial Revolution. To depress the key to sound the note c” required 34 grams of weight in 1800, but in 1860 it had become 80 grams. The enlargement of the most popular solo instrument in the Romantic period reflected the increasing size of concert halls, and spiritual significance of the ritualized concerts. The twenty-four-year-old Beethoven had been living in the musical capital, Vienna for three years by the time he composed his first piano sonata. Its dedicatee, Joseph Haydn, was his teacher. Whereas Beethoven in 1795 still depended on aristocratic patronage, the social respectability of “creative genius” allowed Brahms to enjoy financial autonomy throughout his career as a musician, although the early assignment of banner-carrier to the German Romantic Idealism appears to have been a burden to Brahms all his life. By the time he wrote his Op. 120 in 1894, the sixty-one-year-old had already declared his retirement from composition, twice. What revived his creativity was Richard Mühlfeld, clarinetist with the Meiningen orchestra, for whom he wrote his Clarinet Trio, Op. 114, Clarinet Quintet, Op. 115 (1891), and the two Clarinet Sonatas, Op. 120 (1894).
The Age of Revolution is a term that refers to a period with unspecified dates during which Europe went through many upheavals, political, economic and conceptual. The Industrial Revolution and Napoleon’s technocracy helped propagate the notion in which power was no longer something that one had to be born into, but something that one could gain by acquisition of wealth, practical knowledge, special skills, art or craft. People felt more entitled to their self-centered world view, and some of the social consequences were anarchical manifesting in examples such as materialism, profit-driven amoral business dealings, and idolization of out-law criminals.
As members of the ensemble MATIMA that promotes the notion of music as a universal language with our faith in the power of music to heal and unite people, we saw the repertoire from this time period especially appropriate to today’s climate. With the advancement of technology and mass media and social media physically isolating individuals, feeding us information that cater to our tendencies, the world seems to be becoming increasingly divisive. People are defensive about their self-interests and perspective, and has become less tolerant of others. However, Beethoven and Brahms demonstrate to us how the ultimate celebration of individual uniqueness in the expression of their creative genius, that withstood the test of time, remains to be about humanity and celebration of our ability to empathize.


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