Maurice Tani & 77 El Deora | Blue Line

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Country: Americana Folk: Urban Folk Moods: Type: Vocal
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Blue Line

by Maurice Tani & 77 El Deora

A unique brand of torch and twang that is at once smart, dark, sassy... and fun.
Genre: Country: Americana
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. When I'm Drinkin' (I Ain't Thinkin')
Maurice Tani & 77 El Deora
4:03 $0.99
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2. Fields of Green
Maurice Tani & 77 El Deora
3:11 $0.99
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3. Nadine
Maurice Tani & 77 El Deora
4:09 $0.99
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4. Three Flights to L.A.
Maurice Tani & 77 El Deora
4:22 $0.99
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5. Twisted
Maurice Tani & 77 El Deora
3:11 $0.99
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6. I Think of You
Maurice Tani & 77 El Deora
4:13 $0.99
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7. New Dress
Maurice Tani & 77 El Deora
4:20 $0.99
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8. Red Wine
Maurice Tani & 77 El Deora
5:32 $0.99
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9. Walk On By
Maurice Tani & 77 El Deora
2:40 $0.99
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10. Blue Line
Maurice Tani & 77 El Deora
6:48 $0.99
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11. Happy Hour
Maurice Tani & 77 El Deora
3:18 $0.99
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12. Don't Say It's Over
Maurice Tani & 77 El Deora
2:55 $0.99
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13. Your Cheatin' Heart
Maurice Tani & 77 El Deora
4:28 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
BLUE LINE is the fourth studio album from Californographic singer-songwriter Maurice Tani and 77 El Deora. The 13-track collection provides another spin with Tani through his original narratives of open roads and closed chapters and, as always, a unique take on a few classics.

“When I’m Drinkin’ (I Ain’t Thinkin’)” is classic hillbilly noir—a honky tonk shuffle that contemplates the nature of “filters” and alcohol as a lubricant for social interaction. “Fields of Green,” (co-written with Ken Owen and Paul Griffiths) is a romantic ode on the classical theme of a realization that there’s no place like home. Queueing up a cover, Maurice and the band then brings a moody and erotic blend to Chuck Berry’s classic “Nadine.”

Tani’s long-time muse and sparring partner-in-crime Jenn Courtney renders the intimate “Three Flights to L.A.” in breathy, cascading tones: “She’s Venus in repose tonight.” And then, reprised from Tani’s checkered music past (as Calamity & Main, from Honky Tonk Heaven, WIR 0103 2003), “Twisted” makes a comeback in fresh dungarees with smokin’ fiddle and mandolin solos. “I Think of You” (also penned with Owen) is a dark ballad of unrequited love, jealousy and desperation that will chill the bones of the warmest soul.

English songstress Pam Brandon makes the first of two appearances with “New Dress,” a moody yet freedom-claiming impressionist tale of personal rejuvenation. Maurice takes a bluesy-jazzy approach to Mario DeSio‘s “Red Wine,” which features an extensive, soaring sax solo over a liquid, dreamy groove. Track 9 is a shadowy re-imagining of Burt Bacharach’s classic “Walk On By” swathed in lush pedal steel pads and reverb guitar; instantly recognizable yet singular in style.

The album’s rustic and sparsely-arranged title track “Blue Line” is a sordid tale of power, excess, corruption and “redemption” at the hands of fate. (Disclaimer: Any similarity to persons living or dead, or events past or future, is purely coincidental.) “Happy Hour” (yet another penned with Owen) is a broken-hearted honky tonk lament that features a soaring melody, pedal steel hijinx and a protagonist that clings to hope where none appears to be. The character in Jim Bruno’s “Don’t Say It’s Over” is a bit less delusional, but just as committed to a relationship that appears to have fallen apart. Blue Line ends with vocalist Brandon back for a duet with Maurice on a gorgeously dark take on Hank Williams‘ jukebox favorite, “Your Cheatin’ Heart.”


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Tim McGraw

From Hillbilly Noir to Burt Bacharach and Back Again
BLUE LINE is the fourth studio album from Californographic singer-songwriter Maurice Tani and 77 El Deora. The 13-track collection provides another spin with Tani through his original narratives of open roads and closed chapters and, as always, a unique take on a few classics.
“When I’m Drinkin’ (I Ain’t Thinkin’)” is classic hillbilly noir—a honky tonk shuffle that contemplates the nature of “filters” and alcohol as a lubricant for social interaction. “Fields of Green,” (co-written with Ken Owen and Paul Griffiths) is a romantic ode on the classical theme of a realization that there’s no place like home. Queueing up a cover, Maurice and the band then brings a moody and erotic blend to Chuck Berry’s classic “Nadine.”
Tani’s long-time muse and sparring partner-in-crime Jenn Courtney renders the intimate “Three Flights to L.A.” in breathy, cascading tones: “She’s Venus in repose tonight.” And then, reprised from Tani’s checkered music past (as Calamity & Main, from Honky Tonk Heaven, WIR 0103 2003), “Twisted” makes a comeback in fresh dungarees with smokin’ fiddle and mandolin solos. “I Think of You” (also penned with Owen) is a dark ballad of unrequited love, jealousy and desperation that will chill the bones of the warmest soul.
English songstress Pam Brandon makes the first of two appearances with “New Dress,” a moody yet freedom-claiming impressionist tale of personal rejuvenation. Maurice takes a bluesy-jazzy approach to Mario DeSio‘s “Red Wine,” which features an extensive, soaring sax solo over a liquid, dreamy groove. Track 9 is a shadowy re-imagining of Burt Bacharach’s classic “Walk On By” swathed in lush pedal steel pads and reverb guitar; instantly recognizable yet singular in style.
The album’s rustic and sparsely-arranged title track “Blue Line” is a sordid tale of power, excess, corruption and “redemption” at the hands of fate. (Disclaimer: Any similarity to persons living or dead, or events past or future, is purely coincidental.) “Happy Hour” (yet another penned with Owen) is a broken-hearted honky tonk ode that features a soaring melody, pedal steel hijinx and a protagonist that clings to hope where none appears to be. The character in Jim Bruno’s “Don’t Say It’s Over” is a bit less delusional, but just as committed to a relationship that appears to have fallen apart. Blue Line ends with vocalist Brandon back for a duet with Maurice on a gorgeously dark take on Hank Williams‘ jukebox favorite, “Your Cheatin’ Heart.”
Read more...