Mauro Bertoli | Robert Schumann: Papillons Op.2, Toccata Op.7 - Johannes Brahms: Intermezzo Op.118 N.2 - Franz Liszt: the Chapel of William Tell, Romance S.169 , Sancta Dorothea S.187 - Arvo Part: Fur Alina - George Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue

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Classical: Piano solo Classical: Romantic Era Moods: Solo Instrumental
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Robert Schumann: Papillons Op.2, Toccata Op.7 - Johannes Brahms: Intermezzo Op.118 N.2 - Franz Liszt: the Chapel of William Tell, Romance S.169 , Sancta Dorothea S.187 - Arvo Part: Fur Alina - George Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue

by Mauro Bertoli

This is a eclectic collection of several classical piano works by romantic composers such as J. Brahms, R. Shumann and F.Liszt including the renowned Rhapsody in Blue by G. Gershwin in the version for piano solo. Für Alina by Arvo Pärt it's a bonus track !
Genre: Classical: Piano solo
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Papillons Op. 2
17:58 $0.99
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2. Toccata Op. 7
7:24 $0.99
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3. Intermezzo, Op. 118, No. 2
6:40 $0.99
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4. "Années De Pèlerinage" S.160, The Chapel of William Tell
7:45 $0.99
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5. Romance S.169
3:25 $0.99
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6. Sancta Dorothea S.187
2:30 $0.99
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7. Für Alina
2:24 $0.99
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8. Rhapsody in Blue for Piano Solo
17:38 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
01 September 2012
The "Whole Note" review:
In the world of classical music, Italy has long been known for producing famous singers and conductors. For some reason, though, the list of renowned Italian pianists is considerably shorter — Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli and Maurizio Pollini are among those who come to mind. However, with the release of three CDs featuring a young artist by the name of Mauro Bertoli, that list should be immediately augmented!
At the outset, these discs are impressive with their eclecticism. While certain pianists tend to concentrate on music of certain periods, or by particular composers, Bertoli’s repertoire is wide and encompassing, spanning 300 years of piano literature. For example, the CD Rhapsody in Blue and Other Piano Works, focuses primarily on music from the romantic period, with pieces by Schumann, Brahms and Liszt, but also included is the brief and poignant Für Alina by Arvo Pärt. The Brahms Intermezzo Op.188, No.2 and the Liszt Romance S169 are warmly introspective, while the Schumann Toccata Op.7 aptly demonstrates Bertoli’s flawless command of the keyboard. In contrast, Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue provides a rousing conclusion. Bertoli may hail from the land of olive trees, but his convincing interpretation of this jazzy and syncopated music from 1924 has ”Manhattan” written all over it.
The disc From Mozart to Khachaturian is another study in contrasts. Opening with Mozart’s poetic and gracious Rondo K494, the disc also features two of Liszt’s Hungarian Rhapsodies, Schumann’s Sonata for the Young, Op.118, Granados’ Allegro de Concert and Shostakovich’s Three Fantastic Dances — a virtual United Nations of piano literature.
Not many pianists today turn their attention to keyboard music of the Italian Baroque, but three sonatas by Domenico Scarlatti lead off the third disc, all of them demonstrating Bertoli’s manual dexterity and acute sense of timing. Also on this CD are the Schumann Paganini Etudes, Op.3 and Nachtstücke, Op.23. But for me, the highlight of this recording is surely the set of three Danzas Argentinas by Alberto Ginastera. Written in 1937, this music dates from early in the composer’s career and is challenging from all perspectives. With their complex rhythms and chromatic harmonies, these dances might faze many pianists, but Bertoli handles the complexities with apparent ease, bringing the disc to a spirited conclusion. Bravissimo, Mr. Bertoli — let’s hear from you again!

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