Nancy Harrow | Street of Dreams

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Jazz: Jazz Vocals Avant Garde: Experimental Moods: Instrumental
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Street of Dreams

by Nancy Harrow

A joint conception with trombonist/arranger Bob Brookmeyer -- a selection of jazz standards and more recent compositions, including songs by Tom Waits, the Beatles, The Eagles, and Bob Dylan. Produced by John Snyder.
Genre: Jazz: Jazz Vocals
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
clip
1. Street of Dreams
Nancy Harrow
4:21 album only
clip
2. Good Morning Heartache
Nancy Harrow
2:40 album only
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3. Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea (intro)
Nancy Harrow
0:36 album only
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4. (Interlude)
Bob Brookmeyer
0:11 album only
clip
5. Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea
Nancy Harrow
2:39 album only
clip
6. Meantime
Nancy Harrow
3:46 album only
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7. I Can\'t Get Started
Nancy Harrow
1:56 album only
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8. Barney (Martha)
Nancy Harrow
3:41 album only
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9. (Interlude)
Bob Brookmeyer
0:21 album only
clip
10. You Go To My Head
Nancy Harrow
3:16 album only
clip
11. Innocent When You Dream
Nancy Harrow
3:31 album only
clip
12. Nobody Knows You When You\'re Down And Out
Nancy Harrow
2:34 album only
clip
13. (Interlude)
Bob Brookmeyer
0:28 album only
clip
14. Desperado
Nancy Harrow
3:56 album only
clip
15. Most Gentlemen Don\'t Like Love
Nancy Harrow
2:04 album only
clip
16. Why Was I Born?
Nancy Harrow
2:21 album only
clip
17. Fixing a Hole
Nancy Harrow
4:01 album only
clip
18. (Interlude)
Bob Brookmeyer
0:20 album only
clip
19. Maybe It\'s Because I Love You Too Much
Nancy Harrow
3:14 album only
clip
20. Keeping Out of Mischief Now
Nancy Harrow
3:23 album only
clip
21. You\'re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go
Nancy Harrow
3:13 album only
clip
22. (Interlude)
Bob Brookmeyer
0:30 album only
clip
23. Sitting in Limbo
Nancy Harrow
4:05 album only
clip
24. Street of Dreams (Reprise)
Nancy Harrow
1:38 album only

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Produced by John Snyder; With Jim McNeely, piano; Steve LaSpina, bass; Richie DeRosa, drums; Bob Brookmeyer, valve trombone, synthesizer; John Basile, acoustic guitar.


from a review by Thomas Randall:

*****Absolute brilliance!!, June 24, 2002

Nancy Harrow is one of the best kept secrets in jazz singing today --to the general public that is. Her admirers include John Lewis who has recorded with her and Bob Brookmeyer who accompanies her here on synthesizer and valve trombone. Brookmeyer's synthesizer arrangements and backups are eerie and evocative. The melody of the song "Street of Dreams" reasserts itself as a connecting motif throughout. The choice of songs is marvelous and combine beautifully to form a unified emotional synthesis. Harrow is equally at home with the standards as well as with Dylan, Waits, and Henley. Her rendition of "Desperado" is the best I've ever heard. She sings with such intelligence and emotional conviction (on all her albums) that I always feel that I'm inside the personality of the character who Harrow is portraying. This is simply a superb album. One of the best I've ever heard and, trust me, I've heard it over and over and it hasn't worn one bit --it just gets better with age.

from a review by Alan Bargebuhr, Cadence Magazine:

Brookmeyer's use of the synthesizer certainly does open up a Pandora's palette of possibilities in the instrumental mounting of each selection, and he uses the electronics so judiciously that the vocal is never scathed, much less overwhelmed. Even so, it is pure pleasure to hear his trombone burring in on the opening of "Mischief." Each song is lovingly framed. In view of the planning that seems to have gone into the production of each track, it's easy to understand Ms. Harrow's comment about beginning "in April and seeing the seasons change twice before they were finished." Although recording was completed in July, mixing continued through the middle of October.

Ms. Harrow's style, so natural and speech-inflected, can be traced back to Lee Wiley and Mildred Bailey, and not as far back, perhaps, to Irene Kral and Teddi King. In her notes, she acknowledges her responsibility as an actress in both choosing song-roles and making them "meaningful and personal." She is a marvel at it. She has honed a style which is absolutely distinctive without relying on affectation. The listener is drawn into a circle of intimacy proscribed by the power of her quiet conviction.

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