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Nicholas Payton | Afro-Caribbean Mixtape

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World: Caribbean Urban/R&B: Soul Moods: Mood: Upbeat
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Afro-Caribbean Mixtape

by Nicholas Payton

An array of related musical food groups—Bebop, Swing, the Great American Songbook, New Orleans Second Line, Mardi Gras Indian, Soul, Rhythm & Blues, Urban, Hiphop, and various Afro-descended dialects of the Americas and the Caribbean.
Genre: World: Caribbean
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Tape Intro
0:11 $0.99
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2. Afro-Caribbean Mixtape
9:56 $0.99
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3. ACM (Remix 1)
1:05 $0.99
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4. #BAMboula
13:57 $0.99
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5. Intro to Kimathi
3:46 $0.99
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6. Jazz Is a Four-Letter Word
8:13 $0.99
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7. La Guajira
3:24 $0.99
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8. El Guajiro
12:11 $0.99
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9. ACM (Remix 2)
1:12 $0.99
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10. Madmwazél Ayiti
5:31 $0.99
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11. Kimathi (Main Theme)
8:36 $0.99
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12. Jewel
3:38 $0.99
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13. Junie's Interlude
0:44 $0.99
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14. Junie's Boogie
5:06 $0.99
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15. Othello
7:13 $0.99
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16. Kimathi (For Our Elders and Our Children)
3:42 $0.99
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17. Jazz Is a Four-Letter Word (Instrumental)
8:06 $0.99
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18. Relexification (Midnight at Tyler's)
5:02 $0.99
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19. Kimathi (Cotton Gin & Tonic)
6:24 $0.99
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20. The Egyptian Second Line (Instrumental)
14:53 $0.99
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21. ACM (Remix 3)
1:04 $0.99
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22. Call and Response
3:13 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
Afro-Caribbean Mixtape
A powerful personal statement and journey in Black American Music

I play Postmodern New Orleans music.
Louis Armstrong and Danny Barker play Traditional New Orleans Music.
Ellis Marsalis and James Black play Modern New Orleans music.
Kidd Jordan and Clyde Kerr play Avant-garde New Orleans music.
Donald Harrison plays Neoclassical New Orleans music.
I play Postmodern New Orleans music.
I am a part of a lineage.
I am a part of a blood line.
~Nicholas Payton, November 27, 2011

Like a master chef possessing a deft sense of proportion, taste and poetic flair, this forward-looking heir to the traditions of New Orleans blends an array of related musical food groups—Bebop, Swing, the Great American Songbook, New Orleans Second Line, Mardi Gras Indian, Soul, Rhythm & Blues, Urban, Hiphop, and various Afro-descended dialects of the Americas and the Caribbean—into a focused sound that is entirely his own.

On Afro-Caribbean Mixtape, propelled by keyboardist Kevin Hays, bassist Vicente Archer, drummer Joe Dyson, percussionist Daniel Sadownick, and turntablist DJ Lady Fingaz, Payton seamlessly coalesces his interests, drawing on a global array of beats, melodies and harmonic consciousness to serve his lifelong conviction that music is a process by which the practitioner uses notes and tones to map identity and tell a story.

“I’ve been thinking of the resilience of Black people and African culture,” Payton says of the gestation of Afro-Caribbean Mixtape. “How Africans came on ships to ports in the Caribbean. How those rhythms from Africa got dropped off at points like Haiti and Cuba and Puerto Rico. How those influences and elements sauntered on to New Orleans, which many consider the northern-most part of the Caribbean, and on to Kansas City, St. Louis, Chicago and then New York. How, with the advent of the phonograph, this New Orleans music became the world’s first popular music as the result of this new medium. How Louis Armstrong became the world’s first pop star, the Michael Jackson of his era. How the music in this African tribal DNA, as I call it, contains all the codes that connect all people—not only all Black or African people—throughout the world.

“I’ve incorporated elements from all the things I’ve written and spoken about for years. It speaks to the moment politically in an overt way that my other albums don’t. On a musical-conceptual level, I think it’s my greatest work thus far.”


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