New York Tango Jam Session | Berretineando

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Berretineando

by New York Tango Jam Session

Argentine Tangos for dancing
Genre: Latin: Tango
Release Date: 

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  Song Share Time Download
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1. Sorbos Amargos
2:24 $0.99
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2. Hay Que Vivirla Compadre
2:24 $0.99
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3. El Viejo Amor
2:04 $0.99
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4. Bailemos talk through
0:22 $0.99
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5. Bailemos
2:26 $0.99
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6. Duelo Criollo
2:28 $0.99
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7. Suerte Loca
2:20 $0.99
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8. Ventarron
2:48 $0.99
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9. La Ultima Curda
2:28 $0.99
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10. Triste Destino
3:30 $0.99
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11. La Cumparsita talk through
0:17 $0.99
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12. La Cumparsita
4:40 $0.99
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13. Pedro likes it
0:04 $0.99
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14. Sorbos Amargos -- old school
2:25 $0.99
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15. Hay Que Vivirla Compadre -- old school
2:23 $0.99
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16. El Viejo Amor -- old school
2:05 $0.99
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17. Bailemos -- old school
2:26 $0.99
clip
18. Duelo Criollo -- old school
2:28 $0.99
clip
19. Suerte Loca -- old school
2:20 $0.99
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20. Ventarron -- old school
2:49 $0.99
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21. La Ultima Curda -- old school
2:27 $0.99
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22. Triste Destino -- old school
3:31 $0.99
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23. La Cumparstia -- old school
4:42 $0.99
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24. Pedro liked it
0:21 $0.99
Downloads are available as MP3-320 files.

ABOUT THIS ALBUM


Album Notes
This album brings together professional tango music legends Pedro Giraudo (bass), Nick Danielson (violin), and Hector Pablo "El Pulpo" Peyreyra (vocals) along with dancer/musician Evan Griffiths (piano) and Alex Krebs (bandoneon) to create a solid, danceable tango album. This album follows in the footsteps of the great tango orquestas of the Golden Age of tango with solid, traditional techniques, idomatic syncopations, and expressive lyricism that are essential to the genre. It was recorded in one day, and on several tracks there was no sheet music, no run through and very little discussion, and the first take is what is on the disc.
The album was recorded at Lofish Studios in New York by John Hopkins (recording engineer for R.E.M.) in April of 2009, mixed and mastered by Nick Moon at Tone Proper (mastering engineer for George Clinton, Prince, Pink Martini, ...) in December of 2009.

Bios of the musicians and engineers:
Alex Krebs (bandoneon)

Alex has taught tango dancing professionally since 1998. He has toured across the US and Europe teaching in over 80 cities in 10 countries. Alex has been a musician all his life and graduated Reed College in Portland, Oregon in 1999 in music under David Schiff. He started studying the elusive, complicated tango instrument called the bandoneon in 2002, taking lessons with Raul Juarena and Hector del Curto (bandoneonista of Osvaldo Pugliese). Shortly after, he formed the tango sextet "Conjunto Berretin", featuring the jazz pianist great Tom Grant, violinists from the Oregon Symphony,and internationally acclaimed harmonica player Joe Powers. Conjunto Berretin released two successful cd's for dancing. Alex also released a solo project under the name "Orquesta Electronica Berretin" -- a foray into the genre of "techno-tango."
Alex owns the all-Argentine Tango studio "Tango Berretin" in Portland, OR were he resides with his wife and two sons. www.tangoberretin.com
_______________________________________--
Nick Danielson (violin)

Nick Danielson trained on violin in Boston under Roman Totenberg and at the Curtis Institue of Music under Ivan Golamian for eight years. After, he taught at Indiana University for five years before coming to New York. There, in 1988,
he joined the Orpheus Chamber Ensemble and toured Asia and South America. Currently
he is Assistant Concertmaster at New York City Ballet (since 1992), He also plays with with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, and is a popular musician in the Argentine Tango scene, as a violinist with CuarteTango and with Fernando Otero (piano), Hector del Curto (bandoneón), and Pablo Aslan (bass). Nick is considered by many one of the finest interpreters of tango violin in the world.
____________________________________
Evan Griffiths (piano)

Evan has been dancing tango since 1998 and teaching since 2001. He is one of the finest dancers, teachers, musicians,
and DJs in the US tango scene. He’s a beautiful, exciting performer, and an irreplaceable social dancer. Sometimes quiet and incredibly subtle, sometimes drastically daring and fast. His dancing is always precise,
intense, and intimate. He is also one of the most musically talented tango dancer in the world today.

Over the years Evan has visited many places in the States for tango, and spent time dancing in Berlin, Tokyo, and Buenos Aires. He has taught in festivals and workshops across the country and in Berlin. In 2006 the New York dance studio, Dance Manhattan, invited him to move from Oregon to teach for them. Currently he lives in Harlem and has been contributing his insight and energy to the New York tango scene.

Evan studied classical piano for twelve years growing up, and studied music in college. He has been playing tango piano now for the last seven years, and the passion for it has become a major part of his life. Evan plays often with Conjunto Berretin and with the big festival orchestras, and coaches other musicians on how to give tangos the vigor and swing that dancers love.
___________________________________
Pedro Giraudo (bass)

Originally from Cordoba Argentina, Pedro Giraudo moved to New York City in 1996. Since then he has become an in-demand bass player and arranger working in a great variety of musical projects. He has performed professionally with Pablo Ziegler, Kenny Garret, Marco Granados, William Cepeda, Chris Washburn, and Eternal Tango;, and recorded with Fernando Oteros X-Tango, Marta Topferova, Lucia Pulido, Mo'Guajiro & Jess Jurkovic. Pedro Giraudo has participated in various Jazz and Music Festivals throughout the United States, Europe, South America, the Caribbean and Asia and performed in venues such as The Blue Note (Japan), Birdland (Vienna), Kennedy Center (Washington DC), Blue Note, Iridium, Jazz Standard, Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall (NYC). Pedro is considered hands down one of the best tango bass players in the US today.
_________________________
Pablo Hector "El Pulpo" Peyreyra (vocals)
Originally from Buenos Aires, El Pulpo now resides in New York. He has one of the finest voices for tango -- delivering in a stlye that is dramatic in its subtlety and strong in its personality. El Pulpo has collaborated with Pedro Giraudo and many other tango musicians in New York and Buenos Aires. He also works as an actor and videographer for, among other projects, the show Forever Tango.
____________________________________

John Hopkins (recording engineer)

As a veteran Engineer in New York City, John has worked with some of the best in the business including
R.E.M for which he received a Gold Record credit to his list of accomplishments. Other infamous clients include Mr. Roy Ayers, Gerorge Clinton, Q-tip from Tribe Called Quest, Busta Rhymes, Biohazard with Producer Ed Stasium, Nelly MacKay, Dj Jonathan Peters, Leanne Rhymes, Lenny White, Mobb Deep and Corey Gunz...to name a few. His studio training has included such studios as famed spots as The Cutting Room Studios, Quad, Avatar, Stadium Red Studios and Baby Monster Studios. John's musical training began at the early age of 9 with the Drums and then added piano to his repetoire later on in high school. Continuing his thirst for music he attened Berklee College of Music in Boston where he studied with Tommy Thompson and other great professors to hone his craft of song writing and musical arranging. He then went on to Full Sail Center for the Recording Arts to get his degree in Audio Engineering and Sound Production. As a Musician, Engineer or Producer, John is able to bring a unique blend of experience and talent to a recording project. Offering such skills as musical direction, vocal coaching and musicianship, he is able to create, shape, and capture sound accurately and clearly to produce a professional final product. You can find out more about John's career and going's on at his myspace page.
http://www.myspace.com/johnphopkins
_________________________________________

Nick Moon (mixing and mastering engineer)

Nick graduated in audio engineering from Fullsail College in Florida, then worked as 2nd engineer at Studio Chicago before moving to Texas and later settling in Portland. He has mixed and mastered cd's for such names as George Clinton, Pink Martini, The Shins, Prince, Everclear, Ohmega Watts, Liv Warfield, the Dandy Warhols, Lifesavas, among others and currently records, mixes, masters and tours the world with Gino Vanelli. He owns the mastering studio Tone Proper in Oregon.

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Reviews


to write a review

Rich Rodriguez

Solid, danceable, tango -- at the highest level.
The artistic genius of Alex Krebs takes another step forward with his new CD ‘Berretineando,” The New York Tango Jam Session. This disk is like a fine chocolate mouse: smooth, rich, complex, and yummy! A bite of Tango?

In Berretineando, Alex presents us with truly extraordinary world class tango musicians playing from their hearts and minds. From the very first track, Sorbos Amargos, we hear the musicians skillfully, playfully ‘in the groove’ under Alex’s direction. Listen to the first bridge in this track (about 0:17 in) to hear how Alex makes these musicians really ‘click’. Sweet.

This is solid, danceable, tango at the highest level.

The bandoneón, or ‘bando’ as it is affectionately called, is the bellows instrument most associated with the unique sound of Argentine tango. Too, the bandoneón has been called the ‘devils instrument’ for its difficulty to master. On Berretineando we hear Alex’s clear command the bando ‘voice.’ For example, on Hay Que Vivirla Compadre we hear the bando open with a leading voice; clear, and brisk. Then later in the track, we hear Alex’s bando pulsing rhythmically. “Duelo Criolio” is another example of Alex’s exemplary control of the bando. Throughout the disk we hear Alex’s clear command of the bandoneón, both as a leading instrument and as a rhythmic consol to the piano, base, and violin. So, can we now conclude that Alex has the devil in him?

I think so.

The New York Tango Jam Session is not just about Alex Krebs on the bandoneón, it’s a cadre of musicians. As a rule, I’m not keen with tango singers (maybe it’s because I don’t know Spanish), but Hectro “El Pulpo” Peyreyra’s voice is silky, sultry, and intense all in one; on every track. El Pulpo paints colors in my ears. Fascinating. Besides “El Pulpo”, on the track " La Ultima Curda” we clearly hear pianist Evan Griffiths play both ‘punchy’ and melodic; exactly the way superior tango should be expressed, booth sweet and spicy.. Way to go Evan, bang the ivory yet gently when you must! It is the way of life…. On ‘Triste Destino” we clearly hear violinist Nick Danielson rhythmically cry out the angst inherent in the tango… lovingly, and passionately. On “La Cumparsita” we hear bassist Pedro Giraudo definitely lay down the intensity and sublime character which marks this classical tango… did I say percussion on the bass too? Indeed, on “La Cumparsita” each of these world class musicians let us know that they are world lass. Ah. That was a nice one, man.

The physical CD is gorgeous. Emulating a classical design package, Alex provides us with photos of the musicians. The physical disk looks like an old LP record; black in color, visible recording tracks, and a ‘record label’. Way cool! A bonus photo is revealed when you remove the CD from the spindle… that’s for you to discover.
Read more...

Rich Rodriguez

Solid, danceable, world-class tango.
The artistic genius of Alex Krebs takes another step forward with his new CD, “Berretineando:The New York Tango Jam Session.” This disk is like a fine chocolate mousse: smooth, rich, complex, and yummy! A bite of Tango?

In Berretineando, Alex presents us with truly extraordinary tango musicians. We hear the musicians skillfully, playfully “in the groove” under Alex’s direction from the very first track, “Sorbos Amargos.” Listen to the first bridge in this track (about 0:17 in) to hear how Alex makes these musicians really ‘click’. Sweet.

This is solid, danceable, tango.

The bandoneón, or “bando,” as it is affectionately called, is the bellows instrument most associated with the unique sound of Argentine tango. It also has been called the “devil’s instrument” for its difficulty to master. Here, Alex has a clear command the bando ‘voice.’ For example, on Hay Que Vivirla Compadre, the bando opens with a leading voice, clear, and brisk. Later in the track, Alex’s bando pulses rhythmically. “Duelo Criolio” is another example of Alex’s exemplary control of the bando , both as a leading instrument and as a rhythmic consol to the piano, base, and violin. So, can we now conclude that Alex has the devil in him?

I think so.

But the New York Tango Jam Session is not just about Alex Krebs on the bandoneón. It’s a cadre of musicians. As a rule, I’m not keen on tango singers. (Maybe it’s because I don’t know Spanish.) But Hectro “El Pulpo” Peyreyra’s voice is silky, sultry, and intense all in one, on every track. El Pulpo paints colors in my ears. Fascinating. And on the track, “La Ultima Curda,” pianist Evan Griffiths plays both ‘punchy’ and melodic; exactly the way superior tango should be expressed, both sweet and spicy.. Way to go, Evan, bang the ivory yet gently with you must! It is the way of life. On “Triste Destino,” violinist Nick Danielson rhythmically cries out the angst inherent in the tango, lovingly, and passionately. On “La Cumparsita,” bassist Pedro Giraudo definitely lays down the intensity and sublime character which marks this classical tango. Did I say percussion on the bass too? Indeed, on “La Cumparsita” all of these world class musicians let us know that they are indeed world class.

That was a nice one, man.

The physical CD is gorgeous. Emulating a classical design package, Alex provides us with photos of the musicians. The physical disk looks like an old LP record; black in color, visible recording tracks, and a ‘record label’. Way cool! A bonus photo is revealed when you remove the CD from the spindle… that’s for you to discover.
Read more...